Majestic Live Oak

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Texas Live Oak in Austin

Live Oak at Texas State Capitol
Live Oak at Texas State Capitol Live Oak at Texas State Capitol. Steve Nix

Symbol of the "Deep South"

Live oak is a symbolic tree of the Deep South. Quercus virginiana has a squat and leaning form with a large diameter tapering trunk. The leaves are semi-evergreen, are waxy and resist to salt spray which allow the tree to live on the southern coast and on barrier islands. Their prolific acorns are the primary food for coastal wildlife.

Texas can grow a magnificent live oak!

Live oak (Quercus virginiana), also called Virginia live oak, is evergreen with a variety of forms, shrubby or dwarfed to large and spreading, depending upon the site. Usually live oak grows on sandy soils of low coastal areas, but it also grows in dry sandy Woods or moist rich woods.

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    Texas Live Oak on Capitol Grounds

    Live Oak at Texas State Capitol
    Live Oak at Texas State Capitol Live Oak at Texas State Capitol. Steve Nix

    Live oak decline, a wilt disease attributed to Ceratocystis fagacearum, has been reported in Texas where it is killing thousands of trees annually. The disease is also suspected to occur in other Southern States as well and is considered a potentially serious problem.

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    Windsor Ruin Live Oak

    Windsor Ruin Live Oak
    Windsor Ruin Live Oak. Steve Nix

    This Mississippi live oak is growing and neglected. It is just out of sight or the Windsor Ruins historic site.

    Live oak is found in the lower Coastal Plain of the Southeastern United States from southeastern Virginia south to Georgia and Florida including the Florida Keys; west to southern and central Texas with scattered populations in southwestern Oklahoma and the mountains of northeastern Mexico.

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    Windsor Ruin Live Oak

    Windsor Ruin Live Oak
    Windsor Ruin Live Oak. Steve Nix

    Because of live oak's habit of forming a low, widespreading crown, it is widely used as a shade tree and an ornamental. Its acorns are sweet and much sought as food by birds and animals. During the era of wooden ships it was used extensively in shipbuilding because of its hardness and strength.

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    Live Oak and Resurrection Fern

    Windsor Live Oak and Resurrection Fern
    Windsor Live Oak and Resurrection Fern Windsor Live Oak and Resurrection Fern. Steve Nix

    Because of live oak's habit of forming a low, widespreading crown, it is widely used as a shade tree and an ornamental. Its acorns are sweet and much sought as food by birds and animals. During the era of wooden ships it was used extensively in shipbuilding because of its hardness and strength.

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    The Angel Oak

    Charleston, South Carolina's Angel Oak
    America's Oldest Live Oak Charleston, South Carolina's Angel Oak. Steve Nix

    The Angel Oak is a Southern live oak tree located in Angel Oak Park, on Johns Island, South Carolina. It may be the oldest tree east of the Mississippi River.

    The Angel Oak is property of and maintained by the City of Charleston, South Carolina. The tree could be as old as 1500 years but attempts to age the tree have failed. It stands 65 feet tall and the crown covers an area of 17,000 square feet. Its longest limb is 89 feet long.

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    Angel Oak's Largest Limb

    Angel Oak's Largest Limb
    Angel Oak's Largest Limb. Kim Nix

    You can only get a feel for the size of this tree by standing under, and next to, her limbs.

    Although the Angel Oak only grows to 65 feet, it is a monster in spread. The tree's circumference is 25.5 feet, it shades 17,000 square feet, the largest limb is 89 feet long and 11 feet thick.

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    Mobile Live Oak

    Live Oaks on Government Street, Mobile, Alabama
    The William Jefferson Hearing Live Oak Live Oaks on Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. Steve Nix

    This tree shades the Mobile, Alabama Chamber of Commerce building on Government Street.

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    Mobile Government Street Live Oak

    Live Oaks on Government Street, Mobile, Alabama
    Live Oaks on Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. Steve Nix

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    Mobile Live Oak Street Tree

    Live Oaks on Government Street, Mobile, Alabama
    Live Oaks on Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. Steve Nix

    The wood is very heavy and strong but is little used at present. Birds and animals eat the acorns. Live oak is fast-growing and easily transplanted when young so is used widely as an ornamental.

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