Major Taoist Holidays in 2017, 2018, 2019, & 2020

ChineseNewYear_dragon.jpg
Chinese New Year Lion.

 

 Taoist celebrate many of the traditional Chinese holidays, and many of them are shared by some of the other related religious traditions of China, including Buddhism and Confucianism. The dates of they are celebrated may vary from region to region, but the dates given below correspond to the official Chinese dates as they fall in the western Gregorian calendar.

Laba Festival

Celebrated on 8th day of the 12th month of the Chinese Calendar, the Laba festival corresponds to the day when the Buddha became enlightened according to tradition.

 

  • 2017: January 5
  • 2018: January 24
  • 2019: January 13
  • 2020: January 2

Chinese New Year

This marks the first day in the year in the Chinese calendar, which is marked by the full moon between January 21 and February 20. 

  • 2017: January 28
  • 2018: February 16
  • 2019: February 5
  • 2020: January 25

Lantern Festival

The lantern festival is the celebration of the first full moon of the year. This is also the birthday of Tianguan, a Taoist god of good fortune. It is celebrated on the 15th day of the first month of the Chinese calendar.

  • 2017: February 11
  • 2018: March  2
  • 2019: February 19
  • 2020: February 8

Tomb Sweeping Day

Tomb Sweeping Day originated in the Tang Dynasty, when Emperor Xuanzong decreed that celebration of ancestors would be limited to a single day of the year. It is celebrated on the 15th day after the spring equinox.

  • 2017: April 4
  • 2018: April 5
  • 2019: April 5
  • 2020: April 4

Dragon Boat Festival (Duanwu)

 This traditional Chinese festival is held on the fifth day of the fifth month of the Chinese calendar.

Several meanings are ascribed to Duanwu: a celebration of masculine energy (dragon are regarded as masculine symbols); a time of respect for elders; or a commemoration of death of the poet  Qu Yuan.

  • 2017: May 29
  • 2018: June 17
  • 2019: June 7
  • 2020: June 25

Ghost (Hungry Ghost) Festival

 This is a festival of veneration for the dead.

It is held on the 15th night of the seventh month in the Chinese calendar.

  • 2017: September 5
  • 2018: August 25
  • 2019: August 15
  • 2020: September 2

Mid-Autumn Festival

This fall harvest festival is held on the 15th day of the 8th month of the lunar calendar. It is a traditional ethnic celebration of Chinese and Vietnamese people. 

  • 2017: October 4
  • 2018: September 24
  • 2019: September 13
  • 2020: October 1

Double Ninth Day

This is a day of respect for ancestors, held on the ninth day of the ninth month in lunar calendar.

  • 2017: October 28
  • 2018: October 17
  • 2019: October 7
  • 2020: October 25