Make a Stone Circle Sundial

01
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Placing the Stones

StonehengeSun.jpg
Stonehenge is the original sundial. Image by Michael England/Photographer's Choice/Getty Images

Stonehenge is one of the world's best known stone circles, and many researchers have noted that the structure functions as a giant astronomical calendar and sundial. Most people can't build a Stonehenge replica in their back yard, but what you can do is create a sundial of your own using stones you've found. If you have children, this is a great science project to do, but even if you don't have kids, it's fascinating to create your own sundial. If you can do this around Litha, at Midsummer, you'll have the perfect opportunity to recognize the powerful energy of the sun!

You'll need the following items:

  • A pole or straight stick
  • Several large stones
  • A clock or watch to calibrate your sundial

02
of 02
Making Your Sundial

Make a simple sundial at Litha using a stick. You can use it to tell the time on a sunny day. Image © Patti Wigington 2009

Find a place in your yard that gets sun for most of the day. Although it's ideal to do this in the grass of even a patch of dirt, if all you have is a sidewalk or driveway, then that's fine too. Mount the pole by sticking it into the dirt. If you're making your sundial on a hard surface like concrete, then use a block of clay or a bucket of soil to secure the pole.

Keep an eye on your clock. At each hour, take note of where the pole's shadow falls, and mark the spot with a stone. If you start this project in the morning, you'll be able to mark most of the daytime spots - if you start later in the day, you may have to come back the next morning to figure out where your morning hours are.

To tell the time with your sundial, look for the pole's shadow. Where it falls between the stones will give you the time.

 

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