Make Hot Maple Syrup Ice Cream - Molecular Gastronomy

Ice Cream That's Hot Instead of Frozen, Thanks To Science

Try hot maple syrup ice cream on waffles for a fun treat.
Try hot maple syrup ice cream on waffles for a fun treat. Iain Bagwell, Getty Images

Who says ice cream is a dish best served cold? Maybe you should try it hot. Here's a molecular gastronomy project that applies science to make hot ice cream. The key ingredient is methylcellulose, a polymer that gels when it's heated rather than chilled. Try hot maple ice cream on in an ice cream cone or perhaps top your waffles with it.

Hot Maple Syrup Ice Cream Ingredients

  • 150 grams (1-1/4 cup) plain yogurt
  • 115 grams (1/2 cup) cream cheese
  • 50 milliliters (3-1/2 tablespoons) maple syrup
  • 75 milliliters (5 tablespoons) water
  • 20 grams (5 teaspoons) sugar
  • 6 grams (2-1/4 teaspoons) methylcellulose powder (Methocel food gum, SGA 150) [buy it online]

If you're not a fan of maple syrup, make chocolate ice cream by using chocolate syrup instead of maple syrup. You could use other syrup flavors, if you prefer.

Let's Make Hot Ice Cream!

  1. In a bowl, whisk together the yogurt, cream cheese, and maple syrup. The mixture should be smooth and creamy.
  2. In a saucepan, bring the sugar and water to a boil.
  3. Remove the saucepan from heat and whisk in the methylcellulose powder. Mix in the powder until the mixture is smooth.
  4. Whisk the two mixtures together until they are fully blended. This is your ice cream mixture.
  5. Refrigerate the ice cream at least 2-3 hours.
  6. When you are ready to serve the ice cream bring a pot of water to a simmer.
  1. Use an ice cream scoop to drop spoonfuls of the ice cream mixture into the hot water. You can drop multiple scoops into the pot, as long as there is room for them to remain separate.
  2. Let the each scoop of ice cream simmer for 1-2 minutes.
  3. Use a slotted spoon or ladle to remove each maple syrup ice cream scoop. Drizzle on maple syrup, if you like. Enjoy it while it's hot, since this ice cream melts as it cools, rather than as it heats up.

    Do you want to try another molecular gastronomy project? How about making powdered olive oil.