Maps of Ancient Egypt

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Map of the Nile Delta

Map of the Nile Delta
Perry-Castañeda Library Historical Atlas by William R. Shepherd http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/.

From the Perry-CastaƱeda Library Historical Atlas by William R. Shepherd.

Flowing for 5584 km (3470 miles), the Nile River is the longest river in the world. The delta of the Nile River empties into the Mediterranean Sea. The beginning of the Nile is south of Egypt in Lake Victoria.

On this map you can see the city named for Alexander the Great at the top -- in the Mediterranean. Also note the Old Kingdom capital city of Memphis, with Giza (spelled Gizeh) to its west. In Plato's Timaeus Solon hears the story of Atlantis while visiting the Egyptian city in the Nile Delta that is marked on the map as Sais.

More on the Nile.

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The Orient c. 1450 B.C.

The Orient c. 1450 B.C.
The Orient c. 1450 B.C. Perry-Castañeda Library Historical Atlas by William R. Shepherd http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/

Orient comes from a Latin word for rising (

oriens

). Since the east is the direction from which the sun appears to rise, orient basically refers to those to the east of the Greco-Romans. This map of Egypt from c. 1450 B.C. shows Egypt proper and areas controlled by Egypt, including Syria. Other dominant civilizations to the east of Egypt are Assyria and Babylonia, with the Phoenicians controlling much of the eastern coast of the Mediterranean and the metal-rich island of Cyprus.

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Ancient Egypt 750-625 B.C.

Ancient Egypt From The Assyrian Empire and the Eastern Mediterranean
Ancient Egypt From The Assyrian Empire and the Region about the Eastern Mediterranean, 750-625 B.C. The Historical Atlas by William R. Shepherd, 1923. Courtesy of Perry-Castañeda Library Map Collection

The Assyrians dominate the Ancient Near East in this period, but Egypt still controls the Sinai peninsula. Rule by the Assyrians ends when Cambyses II, son of Cyrus the Great of Persia, defeats him and takes control of Egypt, as the pharaoh of both lower and upper Egypt.

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Oriental Empires about 600 B.C. Lydian, Median, Chaldean, and Egyptian Empires

Oriental Empires about 600 B.C. Lydian, Median, Chaldean, and Egyptian Empires
Oriental Empires about 600 B.C. Lydian, Median, Chaldean, and Egyptian Empires. Public Domain. William Shepherd, Historical Atlas. 1911.

By 600 B.C., Egypt's sphere of influence has been reduced. Syria is under Babylonian (Chaldean) control, but the Medes control more than the lion's share of the Ancient near East.

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Ancient Egypt

Ancient Egypt, from The Atlas of Ancient and Classical Geography by Samuel Butler, Ernest Rhys, ed.
Ancient Egypt, from The Atlas of Ancient and Classical Geography by Samuel Butler, Ernest Rhys, editor (Suffolk, 1907, repr. 1908). Courtesy of Maps of Asia Minor

Public Domain. Courtesy of Maps of Asia Minor, the Caucasus, and Neighboring Lands.