Margaret Bourke-White Picture Gallery

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1935: Margaret Bourke-White

Margaret Bourke-White
Photograph of Margaret Bourke-White Margaret Bourke-White posing with equipment she used for a mural at Radio City Music Hall, New York City. Getty Images / Hulton Archive

Woman Photojournalist and Career Photographer

Margaret Bourke-White was the first woman photographer to be attached to a US military unit and the first woman photographer to be permitted on combat missions. Her World War II, Depression, and post-World War II photos help define the 20th century.

Famous for her photographs of architecture and industry -- in the United States, Russia and Germany -- as well as for images of America in the Great Depression, Margaret Bourke-White was a staff photographer for Fortune magazine in 1935.

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1940: Women Making Flags

Margaret Bourke-White - Women Making Flags
Margaret Bourke-White Photograph Women making flags at a factory in Brooklyn, New York July 24, 1940. Getty Images / Margaret Bourke-White

Margaret Bourke-White's image of women in a factory making flags was representative of the patriotic fever in the United States as World War II approached.

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1945: Broken Bridge

Broken Bridge 1945 Margaret Bourke-White
Margaret Bourke-White Photograph 7th April 1945: The Hohenzollern Bridge over the Rhine in Cologne in ruins at the end of World War II. Margaret Bourke-White / Getty Images

At the end of World War II, Margaret Bourke-White documented the fall of Germany in photographs, many of which were printed in Life magazine or in her book, "Dear Fatherland, Rest Quietly": A Report on the Collapse of Hitler's "Thousand Years".

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1945: Down With Adolf

Margaret Bourke-White
Margeret Bourke-White Photograph A woman removes a portrait of Hitler from the wall of a Protestant church in Frankfurt, which had been used by the Nazis as a party headquarters. On the right is a poster warning against careless talk amongst civilians. Getty Images / Margaret Bourke-White

Part of Margaret Bourke-White's images of the failure of Hitler's plan for a thousand-year reich, this image shows a woman in Frankfurt removing a photograph.

The building was a Protestant church that had been commandeered by the Nazis for use as a party headquarters during the war.

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1945: Inmates of the Number Three Erla Work Camp

Inmates of the Number Three Erla Work Camp
Margaret Bourke-White Photograph Margaret Bourke-White image of inmates of the Number Three Erla Work Camp, 1945. Getty Images / Margaret Bourke White

Margaret Bourke-White was with Gen. George Patton's Third Army when it entered concentration camps after the fall of Nazi Germany.

This particular photograph is from the Elba Work Camp, and is one of the less graphic of the photographs. Many others showed camp inmates who were burned by the Nazi camp guards as the Allied troops approached the camp. Life magazine went against its usual policies and published many of Margaret Bourke-White's graphic concentration camp photos, allowing Americans and the rest of the world to take in the extent of the horror of the work camps and concentration camps.

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1965: Margaret Bourke-White with First Life Magazine Cover

Margaret Bourke-White
Margaret Bourke-White Photograph with Margaret Bourke-White Margaret Bourke-White with a print of her photograph from the first cover of Life magazine. Getty Images / Walter Daran

Margaret Bourke-White was hired by Henry Luce as a staff photographer for the new Life magazine, and this image was chosen for the first cover, November 23, 1936.

Depicted in the photo used for that first Life magazine cover was Fort Deck Dam in Montana. It is typical of the architecture and industrial focus of early and some later photography by this pioneer woman photojournalist and war photographer.

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1965: Margaret Bourke-White with Edward Steichen

Margaret Bourke-White with Edward Steichen, about 1965
Picture of Margaret Bourke-White Margaret Bourke-White with Edward Steichen, about 1965. Getty Images / Walter Daran

Margaret Bourke-White was photographed with Luxembourg-born photographer, artist, and curator Edward Steichen in 1965, after her writing and photography career were ended by her struggle with Parkinson's.