Medical Schools in Ohio

Medical School Anatomy Class

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Ohio is home to over 300 colleges and universities, but if you're hoping to earn your Doctor of Medicine degree, you have just six options. All but Case Western Reserve are public universities. Here you'll find information about each of Ohio's medical schools.

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Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine

Case Western Reserve University
Case Western Reserve University.

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Located in Cleveland, the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine placed #24 nationally for research in the U.S. News & World Report 2020 rankings. It is the top-rated medical school in Ohio and the largest biomedical research institution in the state. The newly completed 485,000 square-foot Health Education Campus is likely to add to the school's prestige. In addition, the curriculum is supported by a 3 to 1 faculty to student ratio.

The university offers a wide range of clinical opportunities through affiliated hospitals and health care providers. The Cleveland Clinic, MetroHealth System, and University Hospitals all collaborate with the School of Medicine to provide clinical practice opportunities in fields including anesthesiology, emergency medicine, family medicine, neurology, pathology, and reproductive biology.

Case Western's School of Medicine is also home to the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. This research-focused college enrolls 32 students each year, and instead of a four-year program, students attend for five years to gain in-depth research and clinical experience. All students in the College program receive a full tuition scholarship.

Admission to Case Western's School of Medicine is highly selective. For the class of 2019, 7,556 students applied to arrive at a class of 215. Matriculating students had an average MCAT score of 517, an average cumulative GPA of 3.78, and an average science GPA of 3.75.

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Northeast Ohio Medical University

Education and Wellness Center at Northeast Ohio Medical University
Education and Wellness Center at Northeast Ohio Medical University.

JonRidinger / Wikimedia Commons / CC BY-SA 4.0

NEOMED, the Northeast Ohio Medical University, is located on a 120-acre rural campus in Rootstown, Ohio. NEOMED is home to a College of Medicine, College of Graduate Studies, and College of Pharmacy. The school is home to 959 students, including 586 medical students. The university has partnerships with five academic institutions in Ohio: University of Akron, Kent State University, Cleveland State University, Youngstown State University, and Hiram College. NEOMED is unranked by U.S. News & World Report.

The university has six primary areas of focus for research and innovation. These include community-based mental health, heart and blood vessel disease, musculoskeletal research, and neurodegenerative disease and aging. The university is also home to several centers such as the Best Practices in Schizophrenia Treatment Center and the Wasson Center for Clinical Skills, a simulation facility where students and health care professionals can train.

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The Ohio State University College of Medicine

The James Cancer Hospital at Ohio State University
The James Cancer Hospital at Ohio State University.

Maria Rimmel / Wikimedia Commons /  CC BY-SA 4.0

The Ohio State University College of Medicine has a strong national reputation and earned a #30 ranking for research and a #39 ranking for primary care in the 2020 U.S. News & World Report. The college is home to over 2,000 faculty members who teach across 19 clinical departments, seven science departments, and the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences. The college sits on the southern edge of the main campus of The Ohio State University in Columbus. The college's position within a large, comprehensive research university allows for numerous joint degree programs such as an MD/MBA program and an MD/JD program.

The college takes pride in its LSI (Lead, Serve, Inspire) curriculum that integrates essential foundational knowledge with clinical experiences that begin in the first year. Later clinical experiences emphasize three learning areas: specialized medical care, surgical and reproductive care, and patients and populations.

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University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

The CARE/Crowley Building at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine
The CARE/Crowley Building at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

Adam Sofen / Wikimedia Commons /  CC BY 2.0

In U.S. News & World Report, the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine ranks #38 for research and #48 for primary care. The college is particularly strong in the pediatrics specialty, where it earned a #3 ranking. The College of Medicine is part of the University of Cincinnati Academic Health Center, a collection of institutions which includes the College of Allied Health Sciences, College of Nursing, College of Pharmacy, and numerous more specialized units such as the UC Cancer Institute and Metabolic Diseases Institute. The college partners with over a dozen hospitals and health care providers in the area.

The college is home to 18 clinical departments including surgery, environmental health, ophthalmology, family medicine, and emergency medicine. The curriculum is designed to introduce students to clinical work early, and it also reinforces foundational sciences during the third and fourth years. First-year medical students take the First Responder course in which they prepare to handle patient crises. During the first and second years, all students join Learning Communities, small groups that work with a Clinician-Facilitator to practice drawing on classroom skills to arrive at diagnoses.

Admission to the college is selective. For the class that entered in the fall of 2019, 4,734 students applied, 634 were granted interviews, and 185 matriculated. Students had a mean undergraduate GPA of 3.75 (3.69 in the sciences) and a mean MCAT score of 515.

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University of Toledo College of Medicine

University Hall at the University of Toledo
University Hall at the University of Toledo.

Xurxo / Wikimedia Commons /  CC BY-SA 3.0

The University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences is located on UT's Health Science Campus, about five miles southwest of downtown. The University of Toledo main campus is four miles to the north.

The college's curriculum recently underwent a significant overhaul to introduce students to clinical experiences early in the program, and to better integrate foundational science courses with clinical sciences. In their third year, students focus largely on clinical clerkships in fields that include family medicine, neurology, psychiatry, pediatrics, and surgery. In their fourth year, students continue clinical work and have the opportunity to complete electives anywhere in the U.S. or Canada as well as locations that include Beijing, Amman, Delhi, Addis Ababa, and Manila.

The majority of UT medical students come from Ohio. For the class of 2019, the college received 5,395 applications for an entering class of just 175 students. Matriculated students had an average undergraduate GPA of 3.67 (3.58 in the sciences) and an average MCAT score of 509.

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Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine

The Neuroscience Engineering Building at Wright State University
The Neuroscience Engineering Building at Wright State University.

Allen Grove 

Home to roughly 460 medical students, Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine is located on the university's main campus in Dayton. Unlike many of the universities on this list, Wright State University does not have its own hospital for clinical training. Instead, students gain hands-on clinical experience through eight major teaching hospitals in the region: Dayton Children's Hospital, Dayton Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Kettering Medical Center (a Level II Trauma Center), and Miami Valley Hospital. Students graduate from the program with diverse experiences from a wide range of facilities.

The Boonshoft School of Medicine takes pride in its supportive and collaborative community that fosters camaraderie and personal attention from the faculty. Most of the classroom learning takes place in the Gandhi Medical Education Center, with its state-of-the-art anatomy lab, high-tech lecture halls, and a wide range of learning technologies. The school emphasizes service, and students can volunteer at a free clinic for the uninsured and underserved, provide medical services to local schools, and participate in the International Health Program Track.

For the entering class in 2019, 6,192 students applied, 426 were granted interviews, and 119 students matriculated. The entering class had an average undergraduate GPA of 3.61 and an average MCAT score of 506.5.