Metals List of Elements

List of All Elements Considered to be Metals

Cobalt
Cobalt is a hard, silvery-gray metal. Most elements are metals. © Ben Mills

Most elements are metals. This group includes the alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, transition metals, basic metals, lanthanides (rare earth elements), and actinides. Although separate on the periodic table, the lanthanides and actinides are really specific types of transition metals.

Here's a list of all the elements on the periodic table that are metals:

Alkali Metals

The alkali metals are in group IA on the far left side of the periodic table.

They are highly reactive elements, distinctive because of their +1 oxidation state and generally low density compared with other metals. Because they are so reactive, these elements are found in compounds. Only hydrogen is found free in nature as a pure element and that is as diatomic hydrogen gas.

Hydrogen in its metallic state (usually considered a nonmetal)
Lithium
Sodium
Potassium
Rubidium
Cesium
Francium

Alkaline Earth Metals

The alkaline earth metals are found in group IIA of the periodic table, which is the second column of elements. All of the alkaline earth metal atoms have a +2 oxidation state. Like the alkali metals, these elements are found in compounds rather than pure form. The alkaline earths are reactive, but less than the alkali metals. Group IIA metals are hard and shiny and usually malleable and ductile.

Beryllium
Magnesium
Calcium
Strontium
Barium
Radium

Basic Metals

The basic metals display the characteristics people generally associate with the term "metal".

They conduct heat and electricity, have metallic luster, and tend to be dense, malleable, and ductile. However, these elements start to display some nonmetallic characteristics. For example, one allotrope of tin behaves more as a nonmetal. While most metals are hard, lead and gallium are examples of elements that are soft.

These elements tend to have lower melting and boiling points than the transition metals (with some exceptions).

Aluminum
Gallium
Indium
Tin
Thallium
Lead
Bismuth
Nihonium - probably a basic metal
Flerovium - probably a basic metal
Moscovium - probably a basic metal
Livermorium - probably a basic metal
Tennessine - in the halogen group, but may behave more like a metalloid or metal

Transition Metals

The transition metals are characterized by having partially-filled d or f electron subshells. Because the shell is incompletely filled, these elements display multiple oxidation states and often produce colored complexes. Some transition metals occur in pure or native form, such as gold, copper, and silver. The lanthanides and actinides are only found in compounds in nature.

Scandium
Titanium
Vanadium
Chromium
Manganese
Iron
Cobalt
Nickel
Copper
Zinc
Yttrium
Zirconium
Niobium
Molybdenum
Technetium
Ruthenium
Rhodium
Palladium
Silver
Cadmium
Lanthanum
Hafnium
Tantalum
Tungsten
Rhenium
Osmium
Iridium
Platinum
Gold
Mercury
Actinium
Rutherfordium
Dubnium
Seaborgium
Bohrium
Hassium
Meitnerium
Darmstadtium
Roentgenium
Copernicium
Cerium
Praseodymium
Neodymium
Promethium
Samarium
Europium
Gadolinium
Terbium
Dysprosium
Holmium
Erbium
Thulium
Ytterbium
Lutetium
Thorium
Protactinium
Uranium
Neptunium
Plutonium
Americium
Curium
Berkelium
Californium
Einsteinium
Fermium
Mendelevium
Nobelium
Lawrencium

More About Metals

In general, metals are located on the left-hand side of the periodic table, decreasing in metallic character moving up and to the right.

Depending on conditions, elements belonging to the metalloid group may behave very much like metals. In addition, even nonmetals may be metals. For example, in certain situations, you may find metallic oxygen or metallic carbon.