Moses

Moses (Moshe) liberated the Israelites from Egyptian bondage.

Moses, the son of Amram and Jochebed (Yocheved) of the tribes of Levi, was born in the period of the greatest Egyptian oppression - the second half of the 13th century B.C.E. when Ramses II was Pharaoh of Egypt.

To save him from the Pharaoh's decree to kill all Hebrew male babies, Moses' mother put him in a basket which she sent floating on the Nile river.

The baby were found by the Pharaoh's daughter, and thus Moses was raised in Pharaoh's palace.

When Moses saw an Egyptian beating a Hebrew slave, he killed the Egyptian. Moses then fled to the desert, where he met Midianites. There he marries Jethro the Midianite's daughter Zipporah. While tending Jethro's herd, Moses experiences a revelation. In the form of a burning bush that was not consumed, God tells Moses that he has been chosen to liberate the Israelites from Egyptian bondage.

Moses returns to Egypt and goes to Pharaoh with his brother Aaron (Aharon). They tell Pharaoh that God has commanded him to release the Jews. Pharaoh refused to obey the command. Nine plagues were did not convince Pharaoh to release the slaves. The tenth plague, however, the death of first-born children, including Pharaoh's son, convinced Pharaoh to let the Israelites people go.

The Israelites quickly left Egypt.

Soon after, Pharaoh changed his mind and sent his army in pursuit of the Israelites. When the Israelites reached the Red Sea, the waters miraculously parted to let them cross. When the Egyptian army tried to pursue them, the waters closed and the Egyptian soldiers drowned.

After weeks of traveling in the desert, the Israelites reached Mount Sinai.

There, the Israelites received the Torah (the Ten Commandments) and entered into a covenant with God.

God decided that only the next generation would enter the promised land. Moses used the next forty years of wandering in the desert to educate the people. He laid the foundation for a community based on religion and justice. Just before the Israelites entered the promised land, Moses died.

Moses is remembered as the liberator, the leader, the law-giver, the prophet, and the intermediary in the covenant between God and the Jewish people.

More Famous Jewish Leaders Moses (Moshe) liberated the Israelites from Egyptian bondage.

Moses, the son of Amram and Jochebed (Yocheved) of the tribes of Levi, was born in the period of the greatest Egyptian oppression - the second half of the 13th century B.C.E. when Ramses II was Pharaoh of Egypt.

To save him from the Pharaoh's decree to kill all Hebrew male babies, Moses' mother put him in a basket which she sent floating on the Nile river. The baby were found by the Pharaoh's daughter, and thus Moses was raised in Pharaoh's palace.

When Moses saw an Egyptian beating a Hebrew slave, he killed the Egyptian. Moses then fled to the desert, where he met Midianites.

There he marries Jethro the Midianite's daughter Zipporah. While tending Jethro's herd, Moses experiences a revelation. In the form of a burning bush that was not consumed, God tells Moses that he has been chosen to liberate the Israelites from Egyptian bondage.

Moses returns to Egypt and goes to Pharaoh with his brother Aaron (Aharon). They tell Pharaoh that God has commanded him to release the Jews. Pharaoh refused to obey the command. Nine plagues were did not convince Pharaoh to release the slaves. The tenth plague, however, the death of first-born children, including Pharaoh's son, convinced Pharaoh to let the Israelites people go.

The Israelites quickly left Egypt. Soon after, Pharaoh changed his mind and sent his army in pursuit of the Israelites. When the Israelites reached the Red Sea, the waters miraculously parted to let them cross.

When the Egyptian army tried to pursue them, the waters closed and the Egyptian soldiers drowned.

After weeks of traveling in the desert, the Israelites reached Mount Sinai. There, the Israelites received the Torah (the Ten Commandments) and entered into a covenant with God.

God decided that only the next generation would enter the promised land. Moses used the next forty years of wandering in the desert to educate the people. He laid the foundation for a community based on religion and justice. Just before the Israelites entered the promised land, Moses died.

Moses is remembered as the liberator, the leader, the law-giver, the prophet, and the intermediary in the covenant between God and the Jewish people.