The 10 Best If You Like "1984" to Buy in 2018

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George Orwell presents his dystopian vision of the future in his famous book, "1984." The novel was first published in 1948, and it was based on the work of Yevgeny Zamyatin. If you like the story of Winston Smith and Big Brother, you'll probably enjoy these books, too.

"Brave New World," by Aldous Huxley, is frequently compared to "1984." They are both dystopian novels; both offer troubling views of the future. In this book, society is broken up into strictly regimented castes: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and Epsilon. Children are produced in the Hatchery, and the masses are controlled by their addiction to soma.

In Ray Bradbury's vision of the future, firemen start fires to burn books; and the title "Fahrenheit 451" stands for the temperature at which books burn. Often mentioned in connection with books like "Brave New World" and "1984," characters in this novel commit the contents of the great classics to memory, because it's illegal to own a book. What would you do if you couldn't own a library of books?

This novel is the original dystopian novel, the book upon which "1984" was based. In "We," by Yevgeny Zamyatin, people are identified by numbers. The protagonist is D-503, and he falls for the lovely 1-330.

B.F. Skinner writes about another utopian society in his novel, "Walden Two." Frazier has started a utopian community called Walden Two; and three men (Rogers, Steve Jamnik and Professor Burris), along with three others (Barbara, Mary, and Castle), travel to visit Walden Two. But, who would decide to stay in this new society? What are the drawbacks, the conditions of utopia?

Lois Lowry writes about an ideal world in "The Giver." What is the terrible truth that Jonas learns when he becomes the Receiver of Memory?

In "Anthem," Ayn Rand writes about a futuristic society, where the citizens don't have names. The novel was first published in 1938; and you'll get an insight on Objectivism, which is further discussed in her "The Fountainhead" and ​"Atlas Shrugged."

What kind of society does a group of school boys establish, when they are stranded on a deserted island? Willian Golding offers a brutal vision of the possibility in his classic novel, "Lord of the Flies."

"Blade Runner," by Philip K. Dick, was originally published as "Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep." What does it mean to be alive? Can machines live? This novel offers a look into the future where androids look just like humans, and one man is charged with the task of finding renegade androids and retiring them.

Billy Pilgrim relives his life again-and-again. He's unstuck in time. "Slaughterhouse-Five," by Kurt Vonnegut, is one of the classic anti-war novels; but it also has something to say about the meaning of life.

Benny Profane becomes a member of the Sick Crew. Then, he and Stencil search for the elusive V., a woman. "V." was the first novel written by Thomas Pynchon. In this search for an individual, do the characters lead us on a search for meaning as well?