New York University: Acceptance Rate and Admissions Statistics

Washington Square Park, New York City, USA
Washington Square Park at the center of the NYU campus. Alexander Spatari / Getty Images

New York University is a highly selective private university with an acceptance rate of 16%. Considering applying to NYU? Here are the admissions statistics you should know, including average SAT/ACT scores and GPAs of admitted students.

Why New York University?

  • Location: New York, New York
  • Campus Features: Located in Manhattan's Greenwich Village, NYU's campus occupies some of the most expensive real estate in the country. Housing is guaranteed for four years.
  • Student/Faculty Ratio: 9:1
  • Athletics: The NYU Violets compete in the NCAA Division III University Athletic Association.
  • Highlights: NYU is one of the largest private universities in the country. The school offers over 230 fields of study and ranks among the top New York colleges. NYU has additional campuses in Abu Dhabi and Shanghai.

Acceptance Rate

During the 2018-19 admissions cycle, New York University had an acceptance rate of 16%. This means that for every 100 students who applied, 16 students were admitted, making NYU's admissions process highly competitive.

Admissions Statistics (2018-19)
Number of Applicants 79,462
Percent Admitted 16%
Percent Admitted Who Enrolled (Yield) 45%

SAT Scores and Requirements

New York University has a flexible standardized test policy. Applicants may submit SAT, ACT, AP, SAT Subject test, IB HL Exam, or other international exam scores to fulfill NYU's testing requirement. During the 2018-19 admissions cycle, 64% of admitted students submitted SAT scores.

SAT Range (Admitted Students)
Section 25th Percentile 75th Percentile
ERW 660 740
Math 690 790
ERW=Evidence-Based Reading and Writing

This admissions data tells us that most of NYU's admitted students fall within the top 20% nationally on the SAT. For the evidence-based reading and writing section, 50% of admitted students scored between 660 and 740, while 25% scored below 660 and 25% scored above 740. On the math section, the middle 50% of students scored between 690 and 790, while 25% scored below 690, and 25% scored above 790. Applicants with a composite SAT score of 1530 or higher will have particularly competitive chances at NYU.

Requirements

NYU does not require the optional SAT essay section. The university will superscore the SAT, so applicants who have taken the exam more than once can use the College Board's scorechoice option to submit only their highest scores. Note that NYU does not require SAT Subject Tests, but applicants can choose to submit three subject test scores in place of scores from the regular SAT. Be sure to check out all of NYU's standardized testing options to figure out what approach will work best for you.

ACT Scores and Requirements

New York University has a flexible standardized test policy. Applicants may submit SAT, ACT, AP, SAT Subject test, IB HL Exam, or other international exam scores to fulfill NYU's testing requirement. During the 2018-19 admissions cycle, 28% of admitted students submitted ACT scores.

ACT Range (Admitted Students)
Section 25th Percentile 75th Percentile
Composite 30 34

This admissions data tells us that most of NYU's admitted students fall within the top 7% nationally on the ACT. The middle 50% of students admitted to NYU received a composite ACT score between 30 and 34, while 25% scored above 34 and 25% scored below 30.

Requirements

NYU does not require the optional ACT writing exam. If you took the ACT more than once, NYU will take your highest scores from each section of the exam and create a new superscored composite score for you.

GPA

In 2019, the average high school GPA of NYU's incoming freshmen class was 3.69, and 42% of incoming students had average GPAs of 3.75 and above. This data suggests that most successful applicants to NYU have primarily A grades.

Self-Reported GPA/SAT/ACT Graph

NYU Applicants' Self-Reported GPA/SAT/ACT Graph.
NYU Applicants' Self-Reported GPA/SAT/ACT Graph. Data courtesy of Cappex.

The admissions data in the graph is self-reported by applicants to NYU. GPAs are unweighted. Find out how you compare to accepted students, see the real-time graph, and calculate your chances of getting in with a free Cappex account.

Admissions Chances

New York University is highly selective with a low acceptance rate and standardized test scores that are well above average. To be admitted, you're most likely going to need the full package: "A" grades, high SAT/ACT scores, and impressive accomplishments outside of the classroom. You will notice from the graph above that a few students were accepted with test scores and grades below the norm. NYU has holistic admissions, so the admissions officers are evaluating students based on more than numerical data. Students who show some kind of remarkable talent or have a compelling story to tell will often get a close look even if grades and test scores aren't up to the ideal. Also, because NYU is a diverse, international university, many applicants are coming from countries that have different grading systems than U.S. schools.

The university is a member of the Common Application, a widely used application that provides plenty of opportunities for you to share information other than numerical grade and test score data. Letters of recommendation, the Common Application essay, and your extracurricular activities will all play a role in the admissions process. Students applying to the Steinhardt School or Tisch School of the Arts will have additional artistic requirements for admission. The university does not typically conduct interviews as part of the admissions process, although admissions staff may invite some candidates to interview if they feel a conversation would aid them in making an admissions decision.

Finally, like all selective colleges, New York University will be looking at the rigor of your high school curriculum, not just your grades. Success in challenging AP, IB, Honors, and Dual Enrollment classes can all improve your chances of being admitted, for these courses represent some of the best predictors of college success.

All admissions data has been sourced from the National Center for Education Statistics and the New York University Undergraduate Admissions website.