Photo Tour of Female Pro Forehand Grips

01
of 14

Serena Williams's Forehand Grip

Serena Williams's Forehand Grip
Matthew Stockman / Getty Images

Serena Williams uses her Semi-Western grip to hit one of the most powerful forehands ever seen in women's tennis.

02
of 14

Venus Williams's Forehand Grip

Venus Williams's Forehand Grip
Ryan Pierse / Getty Images

Venus Williams hits less topspin on her forehand than most players who use her 3/4 Western grip, halfway between Semi-Western and Western. A bit more topspin would probably make Venus's forehand more reliable, but she would lose some of her pace.

03
of 14

Maria Sharapova's Forehand Grip

Maria Sharapova's Forehand Grip
Junko Kimura / Getty Images

Maria Sharapova hits almost every forehand as hard as she can, using her Semi-Western grip to get just enough topspin to make her shots stay in.

04
of 14

Samantha Stosur's Forehand Grip

Samantha Stosur's Forehand Grip
Quinn Rooney / Getty Images

Samantha Stosur uses a roughly 7/8 Western grip, one of the most Western grips of any top female player, and not coincidentally, Stosur's forehand has one of the heaviest topspin kicks on the WTA Tour.

05
of 14

Justine Henin's Forehand Grip

Justine Henin's Forehand Grip
Mark Kolbe / Getty Images

Justine Henin usually surprises people when she says she considers her forehand her bigger weapon, because she's best known for her one-handed backhand. Justine uses a Semi-Western forehand grip to hit deep and amazingly hard for her size.

06
of 14

Jelena Jankovic's Forehand Grip

Jelena Jankovic's Forehand Grip
Cameron Spencer / Getty Images

Jelena Jankovic uses her 3/4 Western forehand grip, halfway between Semi-Western and Western, to generate enough topspin to keep her deep shots from flying long and her angle shots from flying wide; she wins with consistency, depth, and placement rather than power.

07
of 14

Elena Dementieva's Forehand Grip

Elena Dementieva's Forehand Grip
Mark Dadswell / Getty Images

Elena Dementieva is widely considered to have groundstrokes as good as anyone's. Dementieva's uses her Semi-Western forehand grip to get an excellent mix of topspin and power; her power is just below the most powerful hitters, but she's more consistent, and she gets great depth.

08
of 14

Caroline Wozniacki's Forehand Grip

Caroline Wozniacki's Forehand Grip
Clive Brunskill / Getty Images

Caroline Wozniacki hits with more topspin than most players who use her Semi-Western forehand grip. Wozniacki's game is built around consistency and depth, rather than power.

09
of 14

Kim Clisters's Forehand Grip

Kim Clisters's Forehand Grip
Mark Kolbe / Getty Images

Kim Clisters uses a roughly 2/3 Western grip, slightly closer to Semi-Western than to Western. The Clisters forehand has one of the largest loop backswings on the WTA Tour.

10
of 14

Li Na's Forehand Grip

Li Na's Forehand Grip
Jamie Squire/ Getty Images

Li Na uses her Semi-Western forehand grip to get solid topspin and pace for a game built around consistency and depth.

11
of 14

Svetlana Kuznetsova's Forehand Grip

Svetlana Kuznetsova's Forehand Grip
Ryan Pierse / Getty Images

Svetlana Kuznetsova uses a Semi-Western forehand grip to hit with slightly less power than the most powerful women, but with more topspin. Kuznetsova's swing style looks to many observers a little more like that typical of a Western grip than the Semi-Western she uses.

12
of 14

Victoria Azarenka's Forehand Grip

Victoria Azarenka's Forehand Grip
Ryan Pierse / Getty Images

Victoria Azarenka is one of the hardest hitters on the WTA Tour, using her 3/4 Western grip, halfway between Semi-Western and Western, to generate more impact than topspin, but quite a lot of both.

13
of 14

Dinara Safina's Forehand Grip

Dinara Safina's Forehand Grip
Ryan Pierse/ Getty Images

Dinara Safina uses a 3/4 Western grip to hit forehands quite hard, with less topspin than most players using the same grip.

14
of 14

Maria Kirilenko's Forehand Grip

Maria Kirilenko's Forehand Grip
Kevin C. Cox / Getty Images

Maria Kirilenko uses a Semi-Western forehand grip to get an even mixture of topspin and power. Kirilenko isn't one of the harder hitters on the WTA Tour, but she succeeds with consistency and quickness.