Photo Tour of the Two-Handed Backhand Grips

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Most Common Two-Handed Backhand Grip

Most Common Two-Handed Backhand Grip
The most common two-handed backhand grip places the left hand in an Eastern forehand position and the right in a Continental position (for a righty). The left arm should dominate two-handed strokes, and having the left hand in an Eastern forehand position puts it squarely behind the racquet. Having the right in the Continental position allows the right wrist to flex upward easily as you execute topspin swings, and it also gives you a reasonable one-handed backhand when you have to let go to stretch for balls or hit a slice or drop shot.
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Double Forehand Two-Handed Backhand Grip

Double Forehand Two-Handed Backhand Grip
The double forehand two-handed backhand grip puts both hands in an Eastern forehand grip position. The left hand's position is strong, but the right's is weak, especially if you have to let go and hit a one-handed backhand. For most players, this grip also makes it harder for the right wrist to flex upward freely when you hit topspin. Despite all of this, some players simply find this grip most comfortable, in part, perhaps, because it allows for a point of contact slightly farther back than the most common grip combination. If you're such a player, and you find that hitting one-handers is the biggest problem, you can learn to switch the right hand's position as you let go with the left.
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More Western Two-Handed Backhand Grip

More Western Two-Handed Backhand Grip
The more western two-handed backhand grip puts the left hand in a Semi-Western forehand position and the right hand in roughly an Eastern backhand position. This grip doesn't have an official name. Some call it "extreme," "Western," "heavy," or "severe." Heavy topspin hitters, especially those who use Western forehands, often like its topspin potential, and it puts the right hand in an excellent position for hitting by itself when needed. The biggest drawback is a point of contact farther forward than the other two-handed grips. The more western grip has more trouble with low balls than its cousins, but it excels at handling high balls.
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Your Citation
Cooper, Jeff. "Photo Tour of the Two-Handed Backhand Grips." ThoughtCo, Aug. 22, 2016, thoughtco.com/photo-tour-of-the-two-handed-backhand-grips-3207974. Cooper, Jeff. (2016, August 22). Photo Tour of the Two-Handed Backhand Grips. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/photo-tour-of-the-two-handed-backhand-grips-3207974 Cooper, Jeff. "Photo Tour of the Two-Handed Backhand Grips." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/photo-tour-of-the-two-handed-backhand-grips-3207974 (accessed October 23, 2017).