Photos of Aviator Glenn Curtiss, the June Bug, and Historic Seaplanes

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Bellis, Mary. "Photos of Aviator Glenn Curtiss, the June Bug, and Historic Seaplanes." ThoughtCo, Jan. 13, 2017, thoughtco.com/photos-of-aviator-glenn-curtiss-4123066. Bellis, Mary. (2017, January 13). Photos of Aviator Glenn Curtiss, the June Bug, and Historic Seaplanes. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/photos-of-aviator-glenn-curtiss-4123066 Bellis, Mary. "Photos of Aviator Glenn Curtiss, the June Bug, and Historic Seaplanes." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/photos-of-aviator-glenn-curtiss-4123066 (accessed September 20, 2017).
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June Bug 1908

June Bug
(1908) Photograph of the June Bug.

Glenn Curtiss was an aviation pioneer who went on to form his own aircraft company. He was born in Hammondsport, New York, on May 21, 1878. As a teenager, he enjoyed building gasoline engines for the motorcycles that he raced. In 1907, he became known as the "Fastest Man on Earth" when he set a motorcycle speed record of 136.3 miles per hour. On Jan. 26, 1911, Glenn Curtiss made the first successful seaplane flight in America.

The June Bug was an aircraft designed by Glenn Curtiss and built in 1908.

Glenn Curtiss and Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone, founded the Aerial Experiment Association (AEA) in 1907, which designed and built several aircraft. One of the aircraft built by the AEA was the first American aircraft to be equipped with ailerons, the White Wing. The invention of the aileron led to a protracted patent fight between Glenn Curtiss and the Wright brothers. The AEA also built the first seaplane to be flown in the United States. In 1908, Glenn Curtiss won the Scientific American Trophy in the first plane that he built and flew, the June Bug, when it made the first public flight of more than one kilometer (0.6 mile) in the United States.

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Aviator Glenn Curtiss 1910

Aviator Glenn Curtiss
Aviator Glenn Curtiss.

Portrait of aviator Glenn Curtiss sitting at the wheel of his airplane in a field in Chicago, Illinois.

In 1909, Glenn Curtiss and his Golden Flyer won the Gordon Bennett Trophy, plus a $5,000 prize, at the Rheims Air Meet in France. He had the best speed in a two-lap triangular 6.2-mile (10-kilometer) course, averaging 47 miles per hour (75.6 kilometers per hour). A Curtiss plane was used to make the first takeoff and landing on the deck of a ship in 1911. Another Curtiss plane, the NC-4, made the first transatlantic crossing in 1919. Curtiss also built the first U.S. Navy aircraft, called the Triad and trained the first two naval pilots. He received the prestigious Collier Trophy and the Aero Club Gold Medal in 1911. The Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company was the largest aircraft manufacturer in the world during World War I. When it went public in 1916, it was the world's largest aviation company. During World War I, it produced 10,000 aircraft, more than 100 in a single week. The Curtiss-Wright Corporation was established on July 5, 1929, with the merger of twelve Wright and Curtiss-affiliated companies. The company still exists. Glenn Curtiss made his last flight as a pilot in May 1930 when he flew a Curtiss Condor over the Albany-New York route. He died two months later.

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Red Wing 1908

Red Wing
Red Wing.

Postcard, April 14, 1908 photograph shows airplane, "Red Wing" on first American public flight.

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First Seaplane circa 1910

First seaplane circa 1910
The seaplane or Hydravion was flown by its inventor, Henri Fabre. First seaplane circa 1910.

A seaplane is an aircraft designed to take off and land upon water.

On March 28, 1910, the first successful seaplane take-off from water at Martinque, France, occurred. The seaplane or Hydravion was flown by its inventor, Henri Fabre. A fifty-horsepower rotary engine powered the first flight, a 1650-foot distance over water. The plane Fabre flew was nicknamed "Le Canard", meaning the duck. On Jan. 26, 1911, Glenn Curtiss made the first successful seaplane flight in America. Curtiss fitted floats to a biplane, then took off and landed from water. Curtiss' contributions to seaplane innovation included: flying boats and airplanes, which could take-off and land on a carrier ship. On March 27, 1919, a U.S. Navy seaplane completed the first transatlantic flight.

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Aeroboat - 1913

Aeroboat 113
Aeroboat 1913.

Aviator Glenn L. Martin landing an aeroboat in Lake Michigan at Chicago, Illinois.

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S-42 Flying Clipper Seaplane

S-42 Flying Clipper Seaplane
S-42 Flying Clipper Seaplane.

The S-42 Flying Clipper Seaplane was made by the Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation.

This large seaplane had a range nearly three times that of Sikorsky's earlier planes and handled superlatively on its maiden flight. It was the first plane put into regular service by Pan American Airways in August 1934, and carried 42 passengers in unparalleled luxury. Sikorsky's majestic "flying boat" or seaplane was used by Pan American Airways between the world wars on many of its pioneering international routes across the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Pan American used this aircraft to make its first Newfoundland to Ireland flight in 1937, and soon after linked America to Asia.

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Diagram of the Flying Clipper Seaplane

Diagram of the Flying Clipper Seaplane
Diagram of the Flying Clipper Seaplane.

A diagram of the Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation's S-42 Flying Clipper Seaplane.

A diagram of the Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation's S-42 Flying Clipper Seaplane.

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Modern Seaplane

Seaplane in Vancouver British Columbia.
Seaplane in Vancouver British Columbia. Photography by Kelly Nigro
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Just for Fun - The Bride 13 Seaplane

Hurled from the Clouds
Hurled from the Clouds.

William Fox presents bride 13 The serial supreme in fifteen episodes : Episode nine "hurled from the clouds" / Otis Lithograph

Motion picture poster for "Bride 13, episode nine, Hurled from the clouds" showing a woman being pushed out of the cockpit of a seaplane over a large body of water; several battleships cruise the sea beneath the drama in "the clouds".

Format
mla apa chicago
Your Citation
Bellis, Mary. "Photos of Aviator Glenn Curtiss, the June Bug, and Historic Seaplanes." ThoughtCo, Jan. 13, 2017, thoughtco.com/photos-of-aviator-glenn-curtiss-4123066. Bellis, Mary. (2017, January 13). Photos of Aviator Glenn Curtiss, the June Bug, and Historic Seaplanes. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/photos-of-aviator-glenn-curtiss-4123066 Bellis, Mary. "Photos of Aviator Glenn Curtiss, the June Bug, and Historic Seaplanes." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/photos-of-aviator-glenn-curtiss-4123066 (accessed September 20, 2017).