Resize Multiple Files with Photoshop Elements

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Process Multiple Files Command

Process Multiple Files Command
How can I resize a whole folder of pictures or multiple pictures using Photoshop Elements?

Sometimes when you want to post photos on the Web or email them, it is better to scale them down to a smaller size so your recipient can load them faster. Or, you may want to scale the pictures down to get them to fit on a CD, memory card, or flash drive. You can resize a whole folder of pictures or multiple pictures at once using Photoshop Elements Editor or Organizer. This tutorial will walk you through both methods.

I'll start by showing you the method for Photoshop Elements Editor because many people don't realize there is a powerful batch processing tool built in to Elements Editor. This works best for processing an entire folder of images rather than multiple images from different places.

Open Photoshop Elements editor, and choose File > Process Multiple Files.

The screen shown here will appear.

Note: The Process Multiple Files command goes back as far as version 3.0--maybe even earlier, I don't recall.
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Choose Source and Destination Folders

Choose Source and Destination Folders
Set "Process Files From" to Folder.

Next to Source, click Browse and navigate to the folder containing the pictures you want to resize.

Next to Destination, click Browse and navigate to the folder when you want to resized photos to go. It is recommended that you use different folders for the source and destination so that you don't accidentally overwrite the originals.

If you want Photoshop Elements to resize all the images in the folder and its subfolders, tick the box to include subfolders.

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Specify Image Size

Specify Image Size
Jump down to the image size section of the Process Multiple Files dialog box and tick the box to resize images.

Enter the size you'd like for the resized pictures. Most likely you will also want to check the box for "Constrain Proportions," otherwise the images dimensions will become distorted. With this enabled, you only need to enter one of the numbers for height or width. Here are some suggestions for the new image sizes:

If your recipients will only be viewing the photos and you want to keep them small, try a size of 800 by 600 pixels (resolution does not matter in this case).

If you want your recipients to be able to print the pictures, enter the desired print size in inches, and set the resolution between 200-300 dpi. Keep in mind that the larger you go for size and resolution, the larger your files will be, and some settings may make the images larger rather than smaller. A good conservative setting for this is 4 by 6 inches, and 200 dpi resolution for medium quality prints, or 300 dpi resolution for high quality prints.

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Optional Format Conversion

Optional Format Conversion
If you want to change the format of the resized images, check the box for "Convert Files" and choose a new format. JPEG High Quality is a good option, but you may experiment with the other choices. If the files are still too large, you may wish to go down to JPEG Medium Quality, for example.

Since resizing images tends to make them softer, you might want to check the box for "Sharpen" on the right side of the dialog box. However, this might make the file size larger than if you had not sharpened.

Click OK, then sit back and wait, or go do something else while Photoshop Elements processes the files for you.

Continue on to the next page to learn how to resize multiple pictures from Photoshop Elements Organizer.

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Resizing from the Organizer

Resizing from the Organizer
If you're not resizing a whole folder of images, you may find it preferable to use Photoshop Elements Organizer to do a batch resize.

Open Photoshop Elements Organizer and select all the pictures you want to resize.

While they are selected, go to File > Export > As New Files(s).

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The Export New Files dialog

The Export New Files dialog
The Export New Files dialog appears where you can set the options for how you want the pictures processed.
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Set the File Type

Set the File Type
Under File Type you can choose to keep the original format, or change it. Because we also want to change the image size, we'll need to choose something other than original. Most likely you will want to choose JPEG because this creates the smallest files.
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Choose Desired Image Size

Choose Desired Image Size
After setting file type to JPEG, go down to Size and Quality and select a photo size.

800x600 is a good size for photos that will only be viewed by the recipients, but if you want your recipients to be able to print them, you may need to go larger. You can choose custom to enter your own size if one of the size options in the menu does not suit your needs. For printing, 1600x1200 pixels will give a good quality 4 by 6 inch print.

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Set Quality, Location, and Custom Name

Set Quality, Location, and Custom Name
Also adjust the quality slider for the images. I try to keep it around 8, which is a good compromise between quality and size. The higher you go here, the better the images will look, but they will be larger files. If you use a large image size, you may need to bump the quality down to make the files smaller.

Under Location, click Browse and navigate to a folder where you want the resized pictures to go.

Under Filenames, you can keep the names the same, or add a common base name and Photoshop Elements will rename the files to that name and append a number string onto the end of each file.

Click Export and Elements will begin processing the files. A status bar will show the progress of the operation, and Elements will show you a message that the export is complete. Navigate to the folder where you chose to put the files and you should find them there.

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Your Citation
Chastain, Sue. "Resize Multiple Files with Photoshop Elements." ThoughtCo, Mar. 3, 2017, thoughtco.com/photoshop-elements-resize-multiple-files-1702687. Chastain, Sue. (2017, March 3). Resize Multiple Files with Photoshop Elements. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/photoshop-elements-resize-multiple-files-1702687 Chastain, Sue. "Resize Multiple Files with Photoshop Elements." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/photoshop-elements-resize-multiple-files-1702687 (accessed November 18, 2017).