Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris

01
of 24
The Jester, 1905

© Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; used with permission
Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973) Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973). The Jester, 1905. Bronze. 16 x 14 x 9 in. (40.6 x 35.6 x 22.9 cm). Bequest of Lisa Norris Elkins, 1950. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

On View February 24-May 2, 2010 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art


Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

02
of 24
Self-Portrait with Palette, 1906

© Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; used with permission
Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973) Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973). Self-Portrait with Palette, 1906. Oil on canvas. 36 3/16 x 28 7/8 in. (91.9 x 73.3 cm). A. E. Gallatin Collection, 1950. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

03
of 24
Woman with Loaves, 1906

© Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; used with permission
Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973) Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973). Woman with Loaves, 1906. Oil on canvas. 39 3/16 x 27 1/2 in. (99.5 x 69.9 cm). Gift of Charles E. Ingersoll, 1931. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

04
of 24
Study for "Les Demoiselles d'Avignon", 1907

© 2010 Estate of Pablo Picasso/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; used with permission
Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973) Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973). Study for "Les Demoiselles d'Avignon", 1907. Watercolor on cream wove paper. 6 7/8 x 8 7/8 in. (17.5 x 22.5 cm). A. E. Gallatin Collection, 1952. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © 2010 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

05
of 24
Still Life with Bowls and a Jug, 1908

© Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; used with permission
Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973) Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973). Still Life with Bowls and a Jug, 1908. Oil on canvas. 32 1/4 x 25 7/8 in. (81.9 x 65.7 cm). A. E. Gallatin Collection, 1952. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

06
of 24
Half Past Three (The Poet), 1911

© Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris; used with permission
Marc Chagall (French, b. Russia, 1887-1985) Marc Chagall (French, b. Russia, 1887-1985). Half Past Three (The Poet), 1911. Oil on canvas. 77 1/8 x 57 in. (195.9 x 144.8 cm). The Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection, 1950. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

07
of 24
Tea Time (Woman with a Teaspoon), 1911

© Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris; used with permission
Jean Metzinger (French, 1883-1956) Jean Metzinger (French, 1883-1956). Tea Time (Woman with a Teaspoon), 1911. Oil on cardboard. 29 7/8 x 27 5/8 in. (75.9 x 70.2 cm). The Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection, 1950. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

08
of 24
Man in a Café, 1912

Image © Philadelphia Museum of Art; used with permission
Juan Gris (Spanish, 1887-1927) Juan Gris (Spanish, 1887-1927). Man in a Café, 1912. Oil on canvas. 50 1/4 x 34 3/4 in. (127.6 x 88.3 cm). The Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection, 1950. Philadelphia Museum of Art. Image © Philadelphia Museum of Art


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

09
of 24
Head of a Woman, 1912

Image © Philadelphia Museum of Art; used with permission
Amedeo Modigliani (Italian, 1884-1920) Amedeo Modigliani (Italian, 1884-1920). Head of a Woman, 1912. Limestone. 27 3/4 x 9 1/4 x 3 in. (70.5 x 23.5 x 7.6 cm). Gift of Mrs. Maurice J. Speiser in memory of her husband, 1950. Philadelphia Museum of Art. Image © Philadelphia Museum of Art


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

10
of 24
Man with a Guitar, 1912

© Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; used with permission
Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973) Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973). Man with a Guitar, 1912. Oil on canvas. 51 13/16 x 35 1/16 in. (131.6 x 89.1 cm). The Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection, 1950. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

11
of 24
Still Life (Newspaper and Lemon), 1913

© Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris; used with permission
Georges Braque (French, 1882-1963) Georges Braque (French, 1882-1963). Still Life (Newspaper and Lemon), 1913. Oil, graphite and charcoal on canvas. 13 11/16 x 10 1/2 in. (34.8 x 26.7 cm). A. E. Gallatin Collection, 1952. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

12
of 24
Self-Portrait, 1914

© Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris; used with permission
Marc Chagall (French, b. Russia, 1887-1985) Marc Chagall (French, b. Russia, 1887-1985). Self-Portrait, 1914. Oil on cardboard. 11 1/2 x 10 1/8 in. (29.2 x 25.7 cm). The Louis E. Stern Collection, 1963. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

13
of 24
Arch, ca. 1914-16

© Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris; used with permission
Constantin Brancusi (Romanian, 1876-1957) Constantin Brancusi (Romanian, 1876-1957). Arch, ca. 1914-16. Oak. 112 5/8 x 97 x 8 5/8 in. (286.1 x 246.4 x 21.9 cm). The Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection, 1950. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

14
of 24
Still Life before an Open Window, Place Ravignan, 1915

Image © Philadelphia Museum of Art; used with permission
Juan Gris (Spanish, 1887-1927) Juan Gris (Spanish, 1887-1927). Still Life before an Open Window, Place Ravignan, 1915. Oil on canvas. 45 5/8 x 35 in. (115.9 x 88.9 cm). The Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection, 1950. Philadelphia Museum of Art. Image © Philadelphia Museum of Art


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

15
of 24
The City, 1919

© Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris; used with permission
Fernand Léger (French, 1881-1955) Fernand Léger (French, 1881-1955). The City, 1919. Oil on canvas. 91 x 117 1/2 in. (231.1 x 298.5 cm). A.E. Gallatin Collection, 1952. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

16
of 24
Three Musicians, 1921

© Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; used with permission
Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973) Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973). Three Musicians, 1921. Oil on canvas. 80 1/2 x 74 1/8 in. (204.5 x 188.3 cm). A. E. Gallatin Collection, 1952. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

17
of 24
Picasso, 1923

© Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris; used with permission
Man Ray (American, 1890-1976) Man Ray (American, 1890-1976). Picasso, 1923. Gelatin silver print. Image: 8 1/2 x 6 1/2 in. (21.6 x 16.5 cm); Sheet: 14 1/2 x 10 15/16 in. (36.8 x 27.8 cm). A. E. Gallatin Collection, 1952. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Man Ray Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

18
of 24
Still Life with a Guitar and a Compote (The Mandolin), 1923

© Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; used with permission
Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973) Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973). Still Life with a Guitar and a Compote (The Mandolin), 1923. Oil on canvas. 31 3/4 x 39 7/16 in. (80.6 x 100.2 cm). A. E. Gallatin Collection, 1952. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

19
of 24
Man and Woman, 1925

© Successió Miró /Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris; used with permission
Joan Miró (Spanish, 1893-1983) Joan Miró (Spanish, 1893-1983). Man and Woman, 1925. Oil on canvas. 39 3/8 x 31 13/16 in. (100 x 80.8 cm). The Louise and Walter Arensberg Collection, 1950. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Successió Miró /Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

20
of 24
Sailor and Sweetheart, 1929

© Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris; used with permission
Chana Orloff (French, b. Ukraine, 1888-1968) Chana Orloff (French, b. Ukraine, 1888-1968). Sailor and Sweetheart, 1929. Bronze. 38 1/2 x 21 x 16 in. (97.8 x 53.3 x 40.6 cm). Purchased with the Bloomfield Moore Fund, 1937. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

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Portrait of Moïse Kisling, ca. 1930

© Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris; used with permission
Chaïm Soutine (Russian, 1893-1943) Chaïm Soutine (Russian, 1893-1943). Portrait of Moïse Kisling, ca. 1930. Oil on cardboard on masonite. 39 x 27 1/4 in. (99.1 x 69.2 cm). Gift of Arthur Wiesenberger, 1943. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

22
of 24
Still Life with a Fruit Dish, 1936

© Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris; used with permission
Georges Braque (French, 1882-1963) Georges Braque (French, 1882-1963). Still Life with a Fruit Dish, 1936. Oil on canvas. 23 3/4 x 32 in. (60.3 x 81.3 cm). The Samuel S. White 3rd and Vera White Collection, 1967. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

23
of 24
Head of a Woman, 1937-38

© Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; used with permission
Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973) Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973). Head of a Woman, 1937-38. Crayon, ink, and pencil on canvas. 18 1/4 x 15 1/4 in. (46.4 x 38.7 cm). The Louis E. Stern Collection, 1963. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.

24
of 24
Man with a Lamb, 1943-44

© Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; used with permission
Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973) Pablo Picasso (Spanish, 1881-1973). Man with a Lamb, 1943-44. Bronze. 79 1/2 x 28 in. (201.9 x 71.1 cm). Base: 30 x 13 in. (76.2 x 33 cm). Gift of R. Sturgis and Marion B. F. Ingersoll, 1958. Philadelphia Museum of Art. © Estate of Pablo Picasso / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York


About the Show:

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris focuses on the decades that Pablo Picasso spent working and either living or based in Paris during the first half of the 20th-century. During the young artist's fourth trip to Paris, in 1904, he decided to stay and quickly assimilated himself into the wide circle of artists, poets and writers who comprised the "avant-garde" (later known as "The School of Paris").

Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris was arranged chronologically, moving from Picasso's Blue and Rose Periods, through Cubism, a re-visitation of the Classical techniques he'd learned in art school, a passing nod to the Surrealists with whom he was friendly, and a growing political consciousness that culminated in joining the Communist party. Throughout, we also saw the works of his friends and friendly rivals.

This exhibition consisted of nearly 200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures by Picasso, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, Fernand Léger, Joan Miró (among many others), most of which came from the Philadelphia Museum of Art's own collection. Picasso and the Avant-Garde in Paris did not travel, but enjoyed such record crowds in Philadelphia that its end date was extended from April 25 to May 2, 2010.