Pictures of Places Along Hadrian's Wall

01
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Who Is Hadrian? (Pictures of Hadrian's Wall start on the next page)

The Emperor Hadrian in the Capitol Museum in Rome
Capitol Museum Rome - Emperor Hadrian | How His Wall Might Have Looked | Wall at the North Tyne | Housesteads Fort | Fort Latrines | Hypocaust | Wall Crosses Britain | Chesters Fort Strongroom | The Mithraeum at Carrawburgh | Wallsend Military Hospital. CC Flickr User tiseb

Emperor Hadrian (Publius Aelius Hadrianus) was born on January 24, 76 A.D. He died on July 10, 138, having been emperor since 117. He succeeded the very popular Emperor Trajan who may or may not have named his nephew (in our terms, cousin once-removed) to succeed him. The succession remains a mystery. As emperor, Hadrian discontinued Emperor Trajan's expansionist policy; instead, Hadrian tried to consolidate the Roman Empire. He spent most of his time traveling, visiting the provinces. Hadrian was not a popular ruler. Since he had no son to succeed him, Hadrian adopted and appointed as successor the man known as Antoninus Pius, probably because of his filial piety in persuading the Senate to deify the late emperor, contrary to their inclination. Before the adoption, Antoninus Pius (Titus Aurelius Fulvus Boionius Arrius Antoninus) had been obliged to adopt as his heirs Hadrian's nephew Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus.

Hadrian is best remembered for a wall named after him: Hadrian's Wall.

  1. Hadrian
  2. Hadrian's Wall as It Is Now and as It Might Have Looked
  3. Hadrian's Wall at the North Tyne - Where Wall Meets Water
  4. Housesteads Fort
  5. Housesteads Fort Latrines
  6. Housesteads Hypocaust
  7. Hadrian's Wall Crosses Britain
  8. Chesters Fort Strongroom
  9. The Mithraeum at Carrawburgh
  10. Hadrian's Wall Military Hospital

02
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Hadrian's Wall as It Is Now and as It Might Have Looked

Hadrian's Wall, Wallsend
Timbers may mark ancient booby trap sites. Hadrian | The Wall Then and Now | North Tyne - Where Wall Meets Water | Housesteads Fort | Fort Latrines | Fort Hypocaust | Crosses Britain | Chesters Fort Strongroom | Mithraeum | Military Hospital. CC Flickr User Alun Salt

In A.D. 122, Hadrian determined that a wall should protect Roman territory in Britain, so he ordered one built at the northern frontier to keep out the barbarians (in this case, the Picts).

Hadrian's Wall, stretching from the North Sea to the Irish Sea (from the Tyne to the Solway), was 80 Roman miles (about 73 modern miles) long, 6-10 Roman feet wide, and 15 feet high. The dimensions grew smaller as the building progressed from east to west. In addition to the wall, the Romans built a system of small forts called milecastles (housing garrisons of up to 60 men) every Roman mile along its entire length, with towers every 1/3 mile. The 80th milecastle, at Bowness-on-Solway, was the last. Larger forts holding from 500 to 1000 troops were built at intervals into the wall, with large gates on the north face. To the south of the wall the Romans dug a wide ditch, (vallum), with 6' high earth banks.

Hadrian's Wall ran, originally, from Pons Aelius (Newcastle upon Tyne), but an addition was made to Segedunum [URL = www.roman-britain.org/places/segedunum.htm], a fort (now, in the town of Wallsend). Hadrian's Wall extends westward to Bowness-on-Solway. The reddish structure that looks like a wall is a reconstruction of what the wall would have looked like. The actual wall is only the pitiful gray remains in front (not the posts).

Photo of Hadrian's Wall at Wallsend.

  1. Hadrian
  2. Hadrian's Wall as It Is Now and as It Might Have Looked
  3. Hadrian's Wall at the North Tyne - Where Wall Meets Water
  4. Housesteads Fort
  5. Housesteads Fort Latrines
  6. Housesteads Hypocaust
  7. Hadrian's Wall Crosses Britain
  8. Chesters Fort Strongroom
  9. The Mithraeum at Carrawburgh
  10. Hadrian's Wall Military Hospital

03
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Hadrian's Wall at the North Tyne - Where Wall Meets Water

Hadrian's Wall Meets the Tyne
Hadrian | How It Might Have Looked | Wall at the North Tyne | Housesteads Fort | Fort Latrines | Hypocaust | Wall Crosses Britain | Chesters Fort Strongroom | Carrawburgh Mithraeum | Wallsend Military Hospital. CC Flickr User Alun Salt

This photograph shows an end of the remains of Hadrian's Wall where it is forced to stop because of the North Tyne river. The Tyne river (divides into the North Tyne and the South Tyne rivers) was on the eastern edge of Hadrian's Wall.

Forts along Hadrian's Wall (from URL = www.roman-britain.org/hw/hw_history.htm "Hadrian's Wall History"):

  • ARBEIA South Shields, Tyne & Wear
  • SEGEDVNVM Wallsend, Tyne & Wear
  • PONS AELIVS Newcastle, Tyne & Wear
  • CONDERCVM Benwell, Tyne & Wear
  • VINDOBALA Rudchester, Northumberland
  • ONNVM Halton Chesters, Northumberland
  • CILVRNVM Chesters, Northumberland
  • BROCOLITIA Carrawburgh, Northumberland
  • VERCOVICIVM Housesteads, Northumberland
  • AESICA Great Chesters, Northumberland
  • CAMBOGLANNA? Birdoswald, Cumbria
  • BANNA? Castlesteads, Cumbria
  • VXELODVNVM Stanwix, Cumbria
  • ABALLAVA Burgh by Sands, Cumbria
  • CONCAVATA Drumburgh, Cumbria
  • MAIA Bowness on Solway, Cumbria

  1. Hadrian
  2. Hadrian's Wall as It Is Now and as It Might Have Looked
  3. Hadrian's Wall at the North Tyne - Where Wall Meets Water
  4. Housesteads Fort
  5. Housesteads Fort Latrines
  6. Housesteads Hypocaust
  7. Hadrian's Wall Crosses Britain
  8. Chesters Fort Strongroom
  9. The Mithraeum at Carrawburgh
  10. Hadrian's Wall Military Hospital

04
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Housesteads Fort

Hadrian's Wall meets Housesteads
Hadrian | How It Might Have Looked | Wall at the North Tyne | Housesteads Fort | Fort Latrines | Hypocaust | Wall Crosses Britain | Chesters Fort Strongroom | Carrawburgh Mithraeum | Wallsend Military Hospital. CC Flickr User Alun Salt

Housesteads Fort (Vercovicium) was one of the main forts, located halfway along Hadrian's Wall. It covers about 5 acres.

It is the most complete Roman fort in Britain. Housesteads Fort is unique in having its long axis aligned with Hadrian's Wall and for having only one gateway to the north, according to The Roman Army From Hadrian to Constantine, by Michael Simkins, Ronald Embleton, which explains this in terms of its geography: it is located on the Whin Sill ridge, which would have made the gradient too steep if the axis had been at the more common right angle to Hadrians Wall. The authors suggest the single entry may be the result of the plan to staff the fort only with infantry.

Housesteads Fort is a great spot along the wall for a visit, you can supplement your tour with a visit to the museum.

  1. Hadrian
  2. Hadrian's Wall as It Is Now and as It Might Have Looked
  3. Hadrian's Wall at the North Tyne - Where Wall Meets Water
  4. Housesteads Fort
  5. Housesteads Fort Latrines
  6. Housesteads Hypocaust
  7. Hadrian's Wall Crosses Britain
  8. Chesters Fort Strongroom
  9. The Mithraeum at Carrawburgh
  10. Hadrian's Wall Military Hospital

05
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Housesteads Fort Latrines

Housteads Latrine
Hadrian | How It Might Have Looked | Wall at the North Tyne | Housesteads Fort | Fort Latrines | Hypocaust | Wall Crosses Britain | Chesters Fort Strongroom | Carrawburgh Mithraeum | Wallsend Military Hospital. CC Photo Flickr User Alun Salt

These ruins of the public, 12-person latrine at the Roman fort at Housesteads, allow you to appreciate the sanitation system the Romans used. There would have been wooden seats and water in stone storage tanks that was used to flush the system since there was no adjacent water source adequate to deal with the volume.

These are said to be the best preserved Roman latrines in Britain.

  1. Hadrian
  2. Hadrian's Wall as It Is Now and as It Might Have Looked
  3. Hadrian's Wall at the North Tyne - Where Wall Meets Water
  4. Housesteads Fort
  5. Housesteads Fort Latrines
  6. Housesteads Hypocaust
  7. Hadrian's Wall Crosses Britain
  8. Chesters Fort Strongroom
  9. The Mithraeum at Carrawburgh
  10. Hadrian's Wall Military Hospital

06
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Housesteads Hypocaust

Roman Hypocaust from Housesteads
Hadrian | How It Might Have Looked | Wall at the North Tyne | Housesteads Fort | Fort Latrines | Roman Hypocaust From Housesteads | Wall Crosses Britain | Chesters Fort Strongroom | Carrawburgh Mithraeum | Wallsend Military Hospital. CC Flickr User Alun Salt

This photograph from Housesteads (Vercovicium), in Northumberland, UK, shows the remains of a hypocaust, the impressive ancient Roman radiant heating system. What you see are stone pillars that would have held up a heated floor. Circulating around the pillars would have been the hot gases heated by an external furnace.

  1. Hadrian
  2. Hadrian's Wall as It Is Now and as It Might Have Looked
  3. Hadrian's Wall at the North Tyne - Where Wall Meets Water
  4. Housesteads Fort
  5. Housesteads Fort Latrines
  6. Housesteads Hypocaust
  7. Hadrian's Wall Crosses Britain
  8. Chesters Fort Strongroom
  9. The Mithraeum at Carrawburgh
  10. Hadrian's Wall Military Hospital

07
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Hadrian's Wall Crosses Britain

Hadrian's Wall
Hadrian | How It Might Have Looked | Wall at the North Tyne | Housesteads Fort | Fort Latrines | Hypocaust | Hadrian's Wall Crosses Britain | Chesters Fort Strongroom | Carrawburgh Mithraeum | Wallsend Military Hospital. CC Flickr User Alun Salt

This lovely photo of Hadrian's Wall on a sunny day shows how it snakes through the countryside going up and down hills. It also shows some of the stones that are intact. Many stones have been removed from Hadrian's Wall -- for any number of reasons.

  1. Hadrian
  2. Hadrian's Wall as It Is Now and as It Might Have Looked
  3. Hadrian's Wall at the North Tyne - Where Wall Meets Water
  4. Housesteads Fort
  5. Housesteads Fort Latrines
  6. Housesteads Hypocaust
  7. Hadrian's Wall Crosses Britain
  8. Chesters Fort Strongroom
  9. The Mithraeum at Carrawburgh
  10. Hadrian's Wall Military Hospital

08
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Chesters Fort Strongroom

Strongroom at Chesters Fort
Hadrian | How It Might Have Looked | Wall at the North Tyne | Housesteads Fort | Fort Latrines | Hypocaust | Wall Crosses Britain | Chesters Fort Strongroom | Carrawburgh Mithraeum | Wallsend Military Hospital. CC Photo by Flickr User Alun Salt

Hadrian's Wall was built to protect from attackers from the north, and also to garrison Roman soldiers. This would have been one of the most important buildings in the complex, the storeroom at the Chesters Fort where soldiers' pay and the army standards were kept. Archaeologist/Photographer Alun Salt notes that unsurprisingly, this would have been guarded 24 hours a day.

  1. Hadrian
  2. Hadrian's Wall as It Is Now and as It Might Have Looked
  3. Hadrian's Wall at the North Tyne - Where Wall Meets Water
  4. Housesteads Fort
  5. Housesteads Fort Latrines
  6. Housesteads Hypocaust
  7. Hadrian's Wall Crosses Britain
  8. Chesters Fort Strongroom
  9. The Mithraeum at Carrawburgh
  10. Hadrian's Wall Military Hospital

09
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The Mithraeum at Carrawburgh

Carrawburgh Mithraeum
Hadrian | How It Might Have Looked | Wall at the North Tyne | Housesteads Fort | Fort Latrines | Hypocaust | Wall Crosses Britain | Chesters Fort Strongroom | Carrawburgh Mithraeum | Wallsend Military Hospital. CC Photo Flickr User Alun Salt

Brocolitia or Procolitia was the Roman name of the fort at Carrawburgh. It is the northernmost point of Hadrian's Wall. The fort itself is not open to visitors, but the Mithraeum is visible. The Mithraeum was central to the worship of the soldier's god Mithras. The Roman Empire was still non-Christian at the time of Hadrian. Mithras was one of many gods honored along the wall.

  1. Hadrian
  2. Hadrian's Wall as It Is Now and as It Might Have Looked
  3. Hadrian's Wall at the North Tyne - Where Wall Meets Water
  4. Housesteads Fort
  5. Housesteads Fort Latrines
  6. Housesteads Hypocaust
  7. Hadrian's Wall Crosses Britain
  8. Chesters Fort Strongroom
  9. The Mithraeum at Carrawburgh
  10. Hadrian's Wall Military Hospital

10
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Hadrian's Wall Military Hospital

Hospital at Wallsend
Hadrian | How It Might Have Looked | Wall at the North Tyne | Housesteads Fort | Fort Latrines | Hypocaust | Wall Crosses Britain | Chesters Fort Strongroom | The Mithraeum at Carrawburgh | Wallsend Military Hospital. CC Flickr User Alun Salt

These remains may show the location of the military hospital (Valetudinarium) by the Segedunum fort. Roman soldiers would have been cared for by skilled surgeons using scalpels and drills. [See Life in a Fort.]

  1. Hadrian
  2. Hadrian's Wall as It Is Now and as It Might Have Looked
  3. Hadrian's Wall at the North Tyne - Where Wall Meets Water
  4. Housesteads Fort
  5. Housesteads Fort Latrines
  6. Housesteads Hypocaust
  7. Hadrian's Wall Crosses Britain
  8. Chesters Fort Strongroom
  9. The Mithraeum at Carrawburgh
  10. Wallsend Military Hospital