Learn About the Top 9 Places to Study

Quiet is key

A college student studying
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When looking for good places to study, we can all rule out a movie theater, a death metal concert, and a conga line. So where does that leave us? To find the best places to study for a test, you just have to look for three things: comfort, appropriate noise levels, and information access. The key to good concentration is to avoid distractions, both visual and auditory. 

01
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A Library

For those who are intimidated by the library, consider these key factors: It's quiet—librarians accept nothing less. It's comfortable—you can find any number of cozy chairs, table arrangements, and nooks to set up shop. It has great information access: books, the internet, and people who specialize in answering your tough questions. What's not to love? The library definitely ranks at the top of the list of best places to study.

02
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Your Room

Studying in your room passes most of the qualifications of a good study place unless you happen to have roommates or noisy neighbors, in which case, you may need to vacate. Otherwise, your room can be an ideal place to study. It's quiet if it's just you, you can be as comfortable as you like (studying in jammies has its upside), and if you're plugged into the net, then your info access is top notch. (Log out of social media accounts to minimize distractions.)

03
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A Coffee Shop

Java while studying? How many ways can you spell bliss? A coffee shop is perfect for studying unless ambient noise is a distraction for you, like it can be for auditory learners. Most coffee shops have Wi-Fi, so you can access info on your laptop. Bonus? The baristas' music choices are almost always perfect for early-morning or late-night cramming sessions.

04
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A Bookstore

Information access is at its best at a bookstore. Thousands of perfectly organized books and magazines are available to you if you're looking for a quick answer. Many large bookstores also offer a café, so you can fill yourself with caffeine or a panini for some brain food while studying. Plus, in general, bookstores aren't large crowd gatherers, so you should have some relative peace and quiet when you pull out the textbooks.

05
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The Park

If you've been cooped up in a classroom and you need to see some green, consider taking yourself to the park for a study session. Get some vitamin D while you look over your perfectly organized notes from class. You can probably find an available signal for your laptop, and nothing says ambiance like chirping birds, wind rustling through leaves, and sun on your shoulders. Bring water and sunscreen. If you're going all Thoreau, tote bug spray as well.

06
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An Empty Classroom

If you're worried about distractions from friends in the library, then consider taking yourself into an empty classroom to study. Sure, it's not as comfortable as some other places, but information access is prime, especially if you find a teacher popping in and out. Plus, if you need 100% quiet during your study time, then this is a good option.

07
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A Study Partner's House

Don't overlook your study partner's house. First, you're getting the benefit of working with someone else who shares your same goals. Second, you have the benefit of information access without having to look anything up online—you can ask someone who's in the same class. Third, your study partner may be able to concoct a great milkshake. You never know.

08
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A Community Center

If the library is too far away from your house, but a community center (like the YMCA, for instance) is pretty close, then head down there for a quick study session. Most community centers have rooms you can use for studying, and because exercising is a great way to relieve test-day stress, you can just hop on the treadmill afterward for a quick run and call it a day.

09
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A Tutoring Center

Finding good places to study is the easy part; maintaining your focus while studying is often the toughest. If you're one of those people who find it difficult to study, then heading to a tutoring center could be right for you. Sure, it'll cost you a little bit of cash, but when you're bringing home the GPA you really want, it will be worth it.