Baseball Players Accused of Using Performance-Enhancing Drugs

A running list of those who have been named or suspended

DENVER - APRIL 21: Barry Bonds #25 of the San Francisco Giants takes batting practice before the game against the Colorado Rockies on April 21, 2006 at Coors Field in Denver, Colorado. Bonds has 708 career home runs, six shy of tying Babe Ruth.
Brian Bahr/Getty Images

In 2007 a report by George Mitchell, which came to be known as the Mitchell Report, on the use of anabolic steroids and human growth hormone rocked Major League Baseball. After the report, the MLB adopted stricter drug testing policy standards that included more testing and increased punishment for offenders.

This is an alphabetical list of players linked to performance-enhancing drugs, either through the 2007 report by investigator George Mitchell or by positive drug tests by Major League Baseball or minor league baseball.

(Note: This is not a list of players who have been proven to use performance-enhancing drugs.)

Eliezer Alfonso: The Colorado Rockies catcher was suspended for 50 games in 2008 for testing positive for PEDs and 100 games in 2011 for a second positive test.

Chad Allen: Played in majors from 1999-2005 for the Twins, Indians, Marlins and Rangers. He was linked by ex-Mets clubhouse Kirk Radomski to purchases of steroids. He cooperated with Mitchell investigation.

Carlos Almanzar: Astros pitcher was suspended for 10 days in October 2005 for violating the MLB performance-enhancing drugs policy.

Rick Ankiel: The pitcher-turned-outfielder received human growth hormone in 2004, according to the New York Daily News. Ankiel maintains he took them as part of his recovery from elbow surgery.

Bronson Arroyo: Arroyo told reporters in July 2009 that he took androstenedione and amphetamines from 1998 to 2003, before they were deemed illegal, and could be on the list of players who tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs because of it.

Antonio Bastardo: The Philadelphia Phillies relief pitcher was named on a client list by accused PED doctor Tony Bosch in 2012 and was suspended for 50 games on Aug. 5, 2013.

David Bell: Bell played in majors for 12 seasons, through 2006. According to Sports Illustrated, he bought human chorionic gonadatropin from a pharmacy in April 2005.

He maintains he had a prescription.

Marvin Benard: He played for San Francisco from 1995-2003. Mentioned in sections of the Mitchell Report on BALCO as getting “the cream” and “the clear” from Barry Bonds' trainer, Greg Anderson.

Gary Bennett Jr.: The journeyman catcher played for St. Louis in 2007. He was linked to Radomski as purchasing human growth hormone. Radomski had a canceled check for $3,200. After the report's release, Bennett admitted he had used HGH.

Rafael Betancourt: The former Cleveland Indians reliever was suspended for 10 days in July 2005 for violating the MLB performance-enhancing drugs policy.

Larry Bigbie: Bigbie played from 2001-06 for Orioles, Rockies and Cardinals. He was linked to Radomski, who had canceled checks for performance-enhancing substances.

Barry Bonds: The all-time home run king was mentioned 103 times in the Mitchell Report, and plead not guilty to perjury and obstruction of justice charges after a grand jury indictment. He was linked to “the cream” and “the clear” through the BALCO scandal and trainer Greg Anderson. He was convicted of one felony count of obstruction of justice, but an appellate court overturned the conviction in 2015.

Ryan Braun: Braun tested positive for elevated testosterone in October 2011, but won on appeal from an arbitrator in February 2012, avoiding a 50-game suspension.

Braun was suspended for the final 65 games of the 2013 season, agreeing to a deal with MLB related to the Bosch case. He didn't specifically admit to taking performance-enhancing drugs, but did say he has "made some mistakes" and was "willing to accept the consequences of those actions."

Kevin Brown: Had a 20-year career that ended in 2005. He was linked to Radomski for purchasing human growth hormone and Deca-Durabolin from 2001 to 2003 or 2004.

Marlon Byrd: The Boston Red Sox outfielder was suspended for 50 games in 2012 for a positive drug test for Tamoxifen, a banned substance.

Paul Byrd: The Cleveland Indians pitcher acknowledged taking human growth hormone between 2002 and 2005, and said he was prescribed HGH for a pituitary tumor.

Everth Cabrera: A shortstop for the Padres, he was named on a client list by accused PED doctor Tony Bosch in 2012 and was suspended for 50 games on Aug.

5, 2013.

Melky Cabrera: San Francisco Giants outfielder tested positive for testosterone and was suspended for 50 games on Aug. 15, 2012. He admitted to taking a substance he "should not have used." He was also named on a client list by accused PED doctor Tony Bosch in 2012.

Ken Caminiti: The 1996 National League MVP estimated that 50 percent of big-league players were using performance-enhancing substances. He admitted to taking steroids to Sports Illustrated in 2002. Died of a drug overdose in 2004 at age 41.

Mike Cameron: The longtime MLB outfielder was suspended for 25 games in 2007 for testing positive for a banned stimulant, which he says came from a tainted supplement.

Jose Canseco: Canseco admitted using steroids, and his book “Juiced” named several players who were using performance-enhancing substances. He testified on the matter to Congress in 2005.

Mark Carreon: Carreon played from 1987-96 for the Mets, Tigers, Giants and Indians. Linked to Radomski as purchasing steroids when Carreon played for the Giants.

Francisco Cervelli: The New York Yankees catcher was named on a client list by accused PED doctor Tony Bosch in 2012 and was suspended for 50 games on Aug. 5, 2013.

Howie Clark: A utility player for the Blue Jays. Linked to Radomski as a purchaser of HGH, paid by money order.

Roger Clemens: According to the Mitchell Report, the seven-time Cy Young Award winner's former strength and conditioning coach, Brian McNamee, injected him several times with steroids from 1998 through 2000, when he played for the Toronto Blue Jays and the Yankees.

Clemens denies he ever used steroids. He was indicted in August 2010 for perjury, obstruction of Congress and false statements after testifying before Congress in 2008 that he didn't use PEDs. He was found not guilty on all six counts in 2012.

Bartolo Colon: The Oakland A's pitcher tested positive for synthetic testosterone and was suspended for 50 games on Aug. 23, 2012. Colon accepted responsibility and did not appeal. Named on a client list by accused PED doctor Tony Bosch in 2012.

Jack Cust: The Oakland A's outfielder is tied to steroids from a conversation with teammate Larry Bigbie in the minors in 2003, according to the Mitchell Report. Bigbie acknowledged that Cust said he had tried steroids.

Nelson Cruz: Cruz, a Texas Rangers outfielder, was named on a client list by accused PED doctor Tony Bosch in 2012 and was suspended for 50 games on Aug. 5, 2013.

Faustino de Los Santos: The pitcher was named on a client list by accused PED doctor Tony Bosch in 2012 and was suspended for 50 games on Aug. 5, 2013.

Brendan Donnelly: Free agent reliever played for Boston in 2007 and was an All-Star for the Angels in 2003. According to the Mitchell Report, he was linked to Radomski as a customer for steroids in 2004. He was also named in a Red Sox internal e-mail discussing concerns that Donnelly was using performance-enhancing substances.

Chris Donnels: Donnels played from 1991-02 with the Mets, Astros, Red Sox, Dodgers and Diamondbacks. Linked to Radomski in the Mitchell Report. He produced eight canceled checks and money orders for HGH and steroids.

Lenny Dykstra: Dykstra played from 1985-96. In the Mitchell Report, he was linked to Radomski, who said he provided Dykstra with steroids after the 1993 season. Radomski said Dykstra admitted to taking steroids in 1989.

Bobby Estalella: The catcher played from 1996-2004. Reported by San Francisco Chronicle as testifying in the BALCO case, and reportedly told the grand jury he took HGH and undetectable BALCO drugs, provided by Greg Anderson.

Matt Franco: The infielder played from 1995-2003 with the Mets, Cubs and Braves. Radomski said he sold Franco steroids in 2000. Franco denies ever talking or meeting Radomski.

Ryan Franklin: The Cardinals reliever was suspended for 10 days in 2005 for violating the steroids policy while pitching for Seattle. Linked to Radomski in the Mitchell Report, which said he purchased Anavar and Deca-Durabolin.

Eric Gagne: The closer was linked to Radomski as a buyer of human growth hormone.

Freddy Galvis: The Phillies infielder was suspended for 50 games in 2012 for a positive test for Colstebol, a banned substance.

Jason Giambi: The 2000 AL MVP testified to the BALCO grand jury that he used steroids obtained from Anderson and also used HGH, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. He was interviewed in the Mitchell investigation and said he began using steroids in 2001 and used “the cream” and “the clear” in 2002.

Jeremy Giambi: The younger brother of Jason Giambi, who played from 1998-2003, testified to the BALCO grand jury and was quoted by the Kansas City Star in 2005 as admitting to taking steroids.

Jose Guillen: Kansas City Royals outfielder was suspended for 15 games for a violation of baseball's drug program in 2007. He was linked to an HGH purchase by a San Francisco Chronicle report.

Jay Gibbons: Baltimore Orioles outfielder was suspended for 15 games in 2007. SI.com reported that Gibbons received HGH and testosterone from a Florida clinic.

Jay Gibbons: Sports Illustrated reported in 2007 that Gibbons, then an Orioles outfielder, received steroids and HGH from Signature Pharmacy in 2003 and 2005. He Was suspended for the first 15 days of the 2008 season. Said he was prescribed HGH.

Troy Glaus: The infielder for several teams received steroids from Signature Pharmacy in 2003 and 2004, according to Sports Illustrated. 

Gio Gonzalez: The Washington Nationals pitcher was named on a client list by accused PED doctor Tony Bosch in 2012. He maintains that he was innocent and that the client of Bosch was his father.

Jason Grimsley: Pitched from 1989-2006, and admitted to using HGH and steroids, according to a May 2006 affidavit by IRS special agent Jeff Novitzky. He was suspended for 50 games in June 2006 for violating the MLB performance-enhancing drug policy.

Jose Guillen: Royals outfielder, according to the San Francisco Chronicle, purchased testosterone and other steroids through the Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center multiple times from 2002 and 2004, and possibly 2005, according to the Mitchell Report. In 2010, the New York Daily News reported that DEA agents intercepted a shipment of pre-loaded syringes of HGH that were addressed to Guillen's wife.

Yasmani Grandal: The San Diego Padres catcher was suspended for 50 games for testosterone use in 2012. Also named on a client list by accused PED doctor Tony Bosch in 2012.

Jerry Hairston Jr: According to the Mitchell Report, he purchased HGH from Radomski, who produced one canceled check.

Clay Hensley: Padres pitcher was suspended for 15 games while in the minor leagues for violating the MILB steroids policy.

Felix Heredia: New York Mets reliever was suspended for 10 days in October 2005 for violating the MLB performance-enhancing drugs policy.

Matt Herges: The former pitcher was linked to Radomski, who said Herges purchased HGH two or three times from 2004 and 2005, according to the Mitchell Report. He admitted to use of steroids in an Associated Press story in 2008.

Glenallen Hill: Hill played from 1989-2001. Linked to Radomski and a buyer of HGH. Hill, as the first-base coach for the Rockies, was required to interview with Mitchell and said he purchased a steroid once from Radomski but never used it. Hill said he was suffering from "marital stress" at the time. He later admitted in an AP story in 2008 to taking steroids.

Darren Holmes: The relief pitcher played for 13 seasons, the last in 2003. According to Sports Illustrated, Holmes said he received HGH from the Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center in 2003, but it was unsolicited and unused.

Todd Hundley: A catcher from 1990-2003 with the Mets, Dodgers and Cubs. Radomski said he sold steroids to Hundley three or four times, beginning in 1996, according to the Mitchell Report. He hit 15 home runs in 1995 and 41 home runs in 1996.

Yusaku Iriki: Mets minor-league pitcher was suspended for 50 games in April 2006 for violating the MLB performance-enhancing drugs policy.

Ryan Jorgensen: Former catcher was suspended for 50 games by MLB for violating the league's drug program in 2007.

Wally Joyner: The former first baseman for the Angels, Padres and Braves played from 1986 to 2001. He testified in the Mitchell investigation that he took steroids three times, decided he had made a mistake and discarded the rest of the pills.

David Justice: The outfielder played from 1989 to 2002 for the Braves, Indians, Yankees and A's. In the Mitchell Report he was linked to Radomski, who said he sold HGH to Justice after the 2000 World Series. Radomski had a canceled check. Also linked to McNamee, who said that Justice told him he received HGH from Radomski. Justice has vehemently denied the accusations.

Chuck Knoblauch:  The second baseman played from 1991 to 2002. Linked to McNamee, who said he acquired HGH from Radomski for Knoblauch in 2001. According to the Mitchell Report, McNamee said he injected Knoblauch at least seven to nine times with HGH.

Tim Laker: Laker played for the Expos, Orioles, Devil Rays, Pirates and Indians from 1992-2006. Linked to Radomski as purchasing steroids. Laker admitted to buying steroids to Mitchell, according to the report, in 1995, 1996, 1997 and 1999. Said he stopped using steroids in 2000.

Paul Lo Duca: Former catcher was linked to Radomski, who said he made six or more transactions with Lo Duca for HGH.

Matt Lawton: Former outfielder from 1995-2006 was suspended for 10 games in November 2005 (first 10 games of 2006) for violating the MLB performance-enhancing drugs policy.

Nook Logan: Free agent outfielder, who played with the Nationals in 2007, is linked to Radomski, who said he sold one kit of HGH to Logan in December 2005., according to the Mitchell Report. Radomski said Logan paid by money order, and Logan's number was in Radomski's phone when he was raided.

Fernando Martinez: The Astros outfielder was named on a client list by accused PED doctor Tony Bosch in 2012.

Gary Matthews Jr.:  The  Angels outfielder was linked to a 2004 purchase of HGH from Applied Pharmacy by Sports Illustrated in a 2007 story. The Albany (N.Y.) Times Union reported that Matthews appeared on a customer list of Applied Pharmacy Services, and according to the report, syringes were found by Chad Allen, a teammate, when they shared an apartment in the minors in 2004.

Mark McGwire: Former A's and Cardinals first baseman played from 1987-2001 and hit 583 home runs, including a then-record 70 in 1998. Accused by Canseco in "Juiced" of using steroids. Denied use at first, then confessed in 2010 about his use of steroids, then HGH, off and on beginning in 1989.

Kent Mercker: Pitched from 1989-2006 for the Braves, Orioles, Indians, Reds, Cardinals, Red Sox, Angels, Rockies, Reds and Cubs. In the Mitchell Report, he was linked to Radomski, who said he sold one kit of HGH to him in 2002. A canceled check allegedly from Merker was not legible.

Sergio Mitre: A relief pitcher, who pitched for the Florida Marlins in 2008, was suspended for the first 50 games of the 2009 season for taking a supplement that contained Androstenedione.

Augustin Montero: The former White Sox reliever was suspended for 10 days in April 2005 for violating the MLB performance-enhancing drugs policy.

Jesus Montero: Seattle Mariners catcher/DH was named on a client list by accused PED doctor Tony Bosch in 2012 and was suspended for 50 games on Aug. 5, 2013.

Michael Morse: Morse was suspended for 10 days in September 2005 for violating the MLB performance-enhancing drugs policy.

Guillermo Mota: Relief pitcher was suspended for the first 50 games of the 2007 season for violating the MLB performance-enhancing drugs policy. Was suspended for 100 games in 2012 when he tested positive for Clenbuterol.

Denny Neagle: A pitcher from 1991-2003 for the Twins, Pirates, Braves, Reds, Yankees and Rockies. In the Mitchell Report he was linked to Radomski, who said he sold HGH and steroids to Neagle five or six times.

Fernando Martinez: The relief pitcher was named on a client list by accused PED doctor Tony Bosch in 2012.

David Ortiz: The Red Sox designated hitter was on the 2003 list of players who tested positive for PEDs.

Rafael Palmeiro: Palmeiro hit 569 home runs in 20 seasons from 1986-2005. Told Congress he never took steroids when he testified in 2006, but tested positive for stanozolol and was suspended for 10 days by MLB. He has denied intentionally taking PEDs, saying he might have unknowingly received PEDs in a B12 injection. Also named in Canseco's book.

Jim Parque: The former White Sox pitcher admitted to taking HGH while rehabilitating from a shoulder injury in 2003, according to the Chicago Sun-Times.

Ronny Paulino: The Marlins catcher was suspended for 50 games in August 2010 for testing positive for a banned substance that he said was a banned dietary pill for weight loss.

Neifi Perez: The Detroit Tigers shortstop was suspended for 80 games in 2007 for testing positive three times for a banned stimulant.

Johnny Peralta: The Tigers shortstop was named on a client list by accused PED doctor Tony Bosch in 2012 and was suspended for 50 games on Aug. 5, 2013.

Andy Pettitte: New York Yankees pitcher was linked to HGH by McNamee, who said he injected Pettitte with HGH that was obtained from Radomski on two to four occasions when Pettitte was rehabilitating an injury. Pettitte admitted he used HGH following the Mitchell Report's release.

Adam Piatt: An outfielder for the A's and Devil Rays from 2000-03. Linked to Radomski, and cooperated with the Mitchell investigation. Piatt took responsibility, saying he bought steroids and HGH but didn't use them for a while, fearing health risks. He said he injected himself beginning in the 2002 offseason. Radomski produced eight canceled checks from Piatt.

Jorge Piedra: The former Rockies outfielder was suspended for 10 days in April 2005 for violating the Major League performance-enhancing drug policy.

Todd Pratt: Pratt played for Phillies, Mets, Cubs and Braves from 1992-2006. Linked to Radomski, who said he sold Pratt small doses of steroids one or two times, according to the Mitchell Report.

Manny Ramirez: The Outfielder was suspended for 50 days in on May 7, 2009 as a member of the Dodgers for violating the MLB performance-enhancing drugs policy. He tested positive for chorionic gonadatropin (HCG), typically a drug women take for fertility issues. But the drug is also known to be taken by male steroid users in order to restart their body's natural production of testosterone. He faced a second suspension as a member of the Rays on April 9, 2011, for another positive test, but retired from MLB when faced with a 100-game suspension. 

Juan Rincon: Twins pitcher was suspended for 10 days in May 2005 for violating the MLB performance-enhancing drugs policy.

Armando Rios: An outfielder from 1998-2003 for the Giants and White Sox. He was linked to the BALCO case by the San Francisco Chronicle as telling a federal agent that he purchased HGH and testosterone from Greg Anderson.

Brian Roberts: According to the Mitchell Report, the Orioles second baseman told Larry Bigbie that he injected himself with steroids once or twice in 2003. He admitted he took steroids once, after the report was released.

John Rocker: A former reliever, whose career ended in 2003, was linked to a prescription for HGH by Sports Illustrated in 2003. 

Alex Rodriguez: The Yankees slugger tested positive for two steroids in an anonymous 2003 drug test, according to a Feb. 7, 2009 Sports Illustrated story. Two days later, Rodriguez admitted that the story was true, and that he took steroids from 2001-03. Later, was named on a client list by accused PED doctor Tony Bosch in 2012 and was suspended for the last part of the 2013 season and all of the 2014 season. He is appealing the decision.

Ivan Rodriguez: Accused by Jose Canseco in his book, who said he injected Rodriguez when both players played for the Texas Rangers. Rodriguez denied the allegation and has never tested positive, nor was he named in the Mitchell Report.

J.C. Romero: As a Phillies relief pitcher he was suspended for the first 50 games of the 2009 season for taking 6-OXO Extreme, a banned supplement.

Juan Salas: The Rays pitcher was suspended for 50 games in May 2007 for violating the MLB performance-enhancing drugs policy.

F.P. Santangelo: An infielder from 1995-2001 with the Expos, Giants, Dodgers and A's. Linked to Radomski as a purchaser of HGH and steroids. Radomski had a canceled check from 2000, according to the Mitchell Report.

Benito Santiago: The Former All-Star catcher who played from 1986-2005, he testified to the BALCO grand jury that he received HGH and an injectable steroid from Greg Anderson, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

Scott Schoenweis: The Mets reliever received six shipments of steroids in 2003 and 2004 from Signature Pharmacy, according to ESPN.com. Schoenweis, a cancer survivor, denies ever receiving shipments from the pharmacy.

David Segui: A first baseman from 1990-2004 for the Orioles, Mets, Expos, Mariners, Blue Jays, Rangers and Indians admitted he used HGH with a doctor's prescription to the Baltimore Sun and said he bought steroids from Radomski.

Dan Serafini: The Colorado Rockies pitcher was suspended for 50 games in 2007 for a positive PED test.

Gary Sheffield: The Tigers designated hitter told HBO that he took “the clear” and “the cream” when working out with Barry Bonds, but said he didn't know they were steroids.

Sammy Sosa: A big-time slugger, sixth on the all-time home run list at the time of his retirement, played with the Cubs in 2003 when he tested positive for a banned substance, according to a report by the New York Times in June 2009. Sosa testified before Congress in 2005 that he never took steroids.

Mike Stanton: The former relief pitcher was best known for pitching for the Braves and Yankees, is linked to Radomski, who recalls selling HGH to Stanton in 2003, who paid by money order and by cash, according to the Mitchell Report.

Ricky Stone: Stone pitched for the Reds in 2007. He is named in the Mitchell Report as injecting himself with steroids before a game in 1999 with Matt Herges, Paul Lo Duca, Jeff Williams and Mike Judd, according to a minor league strength coach.

Jamal Strong: The former Mariners outfielder was suspended for 10 games in April 2005 for violating the MLB performance-enhancing drug policy.

Miguel Tejada: A longtime big-league shortstop and 2005 AL MVP was implicated by Rafael Palmeiro as a steroid user after Rafael Palmeiro tested positive, and he was also named by former teammate Adam Piatt, who said he obtained steroids and HGH for Tejada, according to the Mitchell Report. He was charged with lying to Congress in February 2009. Pleaded guilty and received probation.

Ismael Valdez: Pitcher from 1994-2005, mostly for the Dodgers, bought HGH and other performance-enhancing drugs in 2002 from the Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center, according to a San Francisco Chronicle report.

Mo Vaughn: First baseman for the Red Sox, Angels and Mets from 1991-2003, and the 1995 AL MVP. According to the Mitchell Report, he was linked to Radomski, who said Vaughn purchased HGH. Radomski produced three canceled checks from Vaughn.

Randy Velarde: An infielder from 1987-2002. He's linked to the BALCO investigation. The San Francisco Chronicle reported in 2004 that Velarde received steroids and HGH from BALCO, according to information given to federal investigators.

Ron Villone: The relief pitcher was linked to Radomski, who said Villone purchased HGH from him in 2004 and 2005.

Fernando Vina: The second baseman played from 1993-2004. In the Mitchell Report, he was linked to Radomski, who said he sold HGH to Vina six to eight times from 2000 to 2005. Radomski produced three canceled checks from Vina. After the report's release, Vina admitted he used HGH in an ESPN interview, but never steroids.

Edinson Volquez: The pitcher was suspended for 50 games in 2010 following a positive test for a banned fertility substance. The Cincinnati Reds pitcher said he received a prescription in the Dominican Republic as part of his treatment to start a family with his wife.

Rondell White: Former outfielder was linked to Radomski, who said White bought HGH and steroids. Radomski produced seven canceled checks from White in the Mitchell investigation.

Matt Williams: A third baseman from 1987-2003 with the Giants, Indians and Diamondbacks and now an Arizona broadcaster. The San Francisco Chronicle reported that he bought $11,600 worth of HGH and steroids in 2002. Williams said a doctor advised him to try HGH to rehabilitate an injured ankle.

Gregg Zaun: The Blue Jays catcher is linked to the Jason Grimsley case and to Radomski, who said he received a check from Zaun in 2001 for steroids, according to the Mitchell Report. Zaun also is linked to former Expos bullpen catcher Luis Perez, who told investigators that he supplied steroids to Zaun and seven other major-league players.