Animal Totem Photos: Prairie Totems

01
of 06

Animal Totems from the Prairieland

Prairie Animal Photos
Prairie Totems. Canva Collage / Getty Images

Animals from grasslands and rolling plains regions are accustomed to seasonal climate changes, dry and hot summers, harsh cold winters. Individuals with prairie totems possess qualities of resilience and stamina.

Animal Totem Galleries

Bird Medicine | Bears as Totems | Domestic and Wild Cats | Insects as Totems | Reptiles | Primates | Amphibians | Mystical Creature Totems

More Animal Totem Galleries by Region or Habitat

Oceanic Animal Totems | Mountain Totems | Farm Animals | Forest and Woodland Critters | Prairieland Totem Animals | Animal Totems from the Arctic | Savanna Animal Totems | Desert Land Totems | Outback Totems

02
of 06

Antelope Totem

Antelope Totem
Survivor / Communicator Pronghord Antelope. S.J. Krasemann / Getty Images

Meanings and Messages: keen intuition, strong sense of smell, mental clarity, protector

Antelope teaches us about survival instincts and being self protective. 

03
of 06

Badger Totem

Badger Totem
Storyteller Badger Totem. Peter Burnage / Getty Images

Meanings and Messages: healer, earth connection, self-reliance, loner

04
of 06

Buffalo, Bison

Buffalo Totem
Co-Creator Buffalo Totem. Eric Foltz / Getty Images

Messages and Meanings: abundance and manifesting, groundedness, initiative, synchronicity, honoring self

The mere size of the American buffalo or bison symbolizes abundance. As a totem the buffalo teaches co-creating and manifestation. Abundance is available if you take initiative and carve out a way for prosperity to come to you.

Buffalo reminds us to keep grounded and to take decisive actions. When Buffalo totem appears you might ask yourself if you have become complacent in following your dreams. Buffalo wants you to move forward and reach out to opportunities when they present themselves.

The buffalo is also the spirit keeper of the northern direction or earth quadrant of the Native American medicine wheel. The birth of a white buffalo is a rare occurrence and is considered a good omen.

05
of 06

Coyote as an Animal Totem

Coyote Totem
Coyote Totem. Don Johnston / Getty Images

Messages and Meanings: diversity, mythology, elusiveness

Archived from Ask an Intuitive Column

Coyote Trickster Tales

by Rose DeDan, Animal Reiki Shaman

 

1st Question from Wallace: That old trickster the coyote has been up to his games again and I have been troubled as to the omens. Two weeks ago, a friend of mine who I have not seen for a while came to visit. We had a wonderful time together, tracking and stalking deer, talk story by the fire, working on a deer hide I recently procured from an unfortunate road kill, and trotting around in our local botanical garden. On our way home from the garden, we spotted a coyote on the side of the road that had been hit by a car. I felt a sting, as coyotes have become so dear to me, but I thought I would honor it by taking it home and making a cape from his hide. This has been difficult as I have yet to successfully brain tan a "hair-on" hide, but enjoyable in the process.

Then yesterday morning, as I was sitting on my front porch drinking a cup of coffee and watching the sun rise, one wild looking coyote tears out of the woods and darts up the road right in front off my house. He gives me a sly side glance and when he is a little farther up the road, then disappeared into the woods. I don't know how to interpret this powerful omen, but my gut says it is important. Coincidentally, I was volunteering for a youth nature day camp that day who uses a teaching method called "Coyote Mentoring." I kept a sharp eye out and receptive heart to any circumstances that would have shed light onto the nature of the omen, yet am still perplexed. From my research into coyote omens, I have found conflicting interpretations between indigenous traditions. I would be grateful for any words of wisdom you could offer.

2nd Question from Raylynn: Where is the best place on the Internet to learn the meanings and messages that our animal spirits have for us? I have been visited by a wild rooster, a calm rabbit and an owl. I have no clue where to find good information. Can you please point me in the right direction?

Response from Rose: Dear Raylynn and Wallace, There are indeed many stories about Coyote, perhaps as many as there are stars in the sky (or so he would like to believe). And the Trickster tales vary from tribe to tribe and location to location, perhaps because such tales are born from the bones of the Earth itself.

Mythic Coyote wears many faces, and the stories reflect that-funny, sad, outrageous, supportive.

I like the one where Creator is handing out new names and Coyote wants to be first in line but oversleeps and the only name left is his own and he is sad. Creator takes pity on him and assigns Coyote the task of teaching the new human people how to hunt, fish, dance, sing, and more.

So, with so much diversity to choose from, how to interpret the message that you received from the two coyotes that spoke to you--one physical, one in Spirit?

I think the best approach is to tackle it from a shamanic perspective where everything operates in four levels:

  • consensual reality
  • symbolic
  • mythic
  • energetic

Reading about the meaning of coyote online can initiate the insight process and ground it in this reality. One such site is Animal Spirits. There is also Animal-Speak by Ted Andrews, considered a staple text for any shamanic library. In addition to extensive information on each animal, his book also contains some helpful exercises for connecting with animal spirit guides and messengers.

However, a list of characteristics and habits of each animal, no matter how thorough, cannot possibly interpret a message intended just for us. Each animal that crosses our path is not only a member of its species, but is also an individual. I've gotten to know a few coyotes personally, and no one is like another. They have different personalities and methods of communication just as we do.

My suggestion would be to connect energetically with the coyote you saw as well as the coyote pelt you brought home. The message/teaching will be revealed through allowing the process/journey to unfold rather than being the destination.

While you certainly could do a shamanic journey in order to achieve this, you can also obtain answers from the coyotes by practicing the "Right Hand/Left Hand Exercise" covered in my previous column Pet Spirit Communication. Don't attach to the outcome; allow what will be to unfold.

Mythic Coyote has shown up to teach as Creator has directed, but it is the human student's role to listen and learn. And since it is Coyote we are talking about, I'm sure the lessons won't be boring!

If you would like to read an excellent collection of Trickster Tales seek out The Coyote Road, edited by Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling. 

06
of 06

Prairie Dog

Prairie Dog Totem
Prairie Dog Totem. Joseph Van Os / Getty Images

Messages and Meanings: Heightened awarenes

Format
mla apa chicago
Your Citation
Desy, Phylameana lila. "Animal Totem Photos: Prairie Totems." ThoughtCo, Mar. 22, 2017, thoughtco.com/prairie-animal-totems-4053392. Desy, Phylameana lila. (2017, March 22). Animal Totem Photos: Prairie Totems. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/prairie-animal-totems-4053392 Desy, Phylameana lila. "Animal Totem Photos: Prairie Totems." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/prairie-animal-totems-4053392 (accessed November 21, 2017).