Princeton University Photo Tour

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Princeton University. Patrick Nouhailler / Flickr

Established in 1746, Princeton University is one of the nine Colonial Colleges that were founded before the American Revolution. Princeton is an Ivy League university located in Princeton, New Jersey. The university offers programs in the humanities, sciences, social sciences, and engineering to its 5,000 undergraduate students. More than 2,600 postgraduates pursue programs at Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and the School of Architecture.

With school colors orange and black, the Princeton Tigers compete in the NCAA Division I of the Ivy League Conference. Princeton is home to more than 28 varsity sports. The most popular sport is rowing, with more than 150 athletes. By 2010, Princeton football had won 26 national championships, more than any other school in the nation.

Notable alumni of Princeton include former Presidents James Madison and Woodrow Wilson and writers F. Scott Fitzgerald and Eugene O’Neill.

Icahn Laboratory at Princeton University

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Icahn Laboratory at Princeton University (click image to enlarge). David Goehring / Flickr

Built in 2003, Icahn Laboratory is home to the Lewis-Sigler Institute for Genomics, which aims to innovate research of modern biology and quantitative sciences. The laboratory features many creative spaces designed by architect Rafael Vinoly. The glass that encases the building’s central atrium is shaded by two-story louvers that cast shadows of the double-helix shape of DNA. The building is named after the main beneficiary Carl Icahn, graduate of Princeton and founder of Icahn Enterprises.

Firestone Library at Princeton University

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Firestone Library at Princeton University (click image to enlarge). Karen Green / Flickr

Opened in 1948, Firestone Library is the main library within Princeton University’s library system. It was the first major American library built after World War II. The library holds more than 7 million books stored in three underground levels. Firestone has four above ground levels, which contain many study spaces for students. It is also home to the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections and The Scheide Library, a social science data center.

East Pyne Hall at Princeton University

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East Pyne Hall at Princeton University (click image to enlarge). Lee Lilly / Flickr

East Pyne Hall served as the university’s main library until the 1948 opening of the Firestone Library. Today it is home to the Departments of Classics, Comparative Literature, and Language. The prominent, Gothic building was completed in 1897. Recent renovations added an inner courtyard, an auditorium and additional classroom and study spaces.

Eno Hall at Princeton University

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Eno Hall at Princeton University (click image to enlarge). Lee Lilly / Flickr

Built in 1924, Eno Hall was the first building solely dedicated to the study of Psychology. Today it is home to the Departments of Psychology, Sociology, and Biology.  The motto carved above its front door, “Gnothi Sauton,” translates to Know Thyself.

Forbes College at Princeton University

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Forbes College at Princeton University (click image to enlarge). Lee Lilly / Flickr

Forbes College is one of six residential colleges that house freshman and sophomores. Forbes is noted for being one of the more social colleges on campus due to its close living quarters. Rooms include private bathrooms for most of the suites. Forbes also features a dining hall, library, theater, and café.

Lewis Library at Princeton University

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Lewis Library at Princeton University (click image to enlarge). Lee Lilly / Flickr

Adjacent to the Frist Campus Center, the Lewis Science Library is Princeton’s newest library building. Lewis houses collections pertaining to Astrophysics, Biology, Chemistry, Geosciences, Mathematics, Neuroscience, Physics and Psychology. The other science libraries at Princeton are the Engineering Library, the Furth Plasma Physics Library, and the Fine Hall Annex.

McCosh Hall at Princeton University

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McCosh Hall at Princeton University (click image to enlarge). Lee Lilly / Flickr

McCosh Hall is one of the main classroom facilities on campus. It contains several large lecture halls in addition to seminar rooms and study spaces. The English Department is housed in McCosh.

Blair Arch at Princeton University

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Blair Arch at Princeton University (click image to enlarge). Patrick Nouhailler / Flickr

Built in 1897, Blair Arch stands between Blair Hall and Buyers Hall, two residence halls that are part of Mathey College. The arch is one of the iconic buildings on the Princeton University campus. Blair Arch is well known for its excellent acoustics, so it’s not uncommon to find one of the university’s many a cappella groups performing in the vaulted Gothic space.

Mathey College is made up of some of the campus’s most attractive buildings, and the College is home to roughly 200 first-year students, 200 sophomores, and 140 juniors and seniors.

Nassau Hall at Princeton University

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Nassau Hall at Princeton University (click image to enlarge). Lee Lilly / Flickr

Nassau Hall is the oldest building at Princeton University. When it was built in 1756, it was the largest academic building in the colonies. Following the American Revolution, Nassau served as the headquarters for the Congress of the Confederation. Today, it is home to a majority of Princeton’s administrative offices, including the Office of the President.

Sherrerd Hall at Princeton University

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Sherrerd Hall at Princeton University (click image to enlarge). Lee Lilly / Flickr

On the east side of campus, the glass cube Sherrerd Hall houses the Department of Operational Research and Financial Engineering within the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Completed in 2008, the 45,000-square-foot building has many eco-friendly sustainable features including an extensive shallow-soil green roof and an auto-dimming lighting system.

Princeton University Chapel

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Princeton University Chapel (click image to enlarge). Lee Lilly / Flickr

The Collegiate Gothic chapel was built in 1928 following a devastating fire in 1921 that destroyed Princeton’s old chapel. Its striking architecture makes it one of the most prominent buildings on Princeton’s campus. Its size is the equivalent of a small medieval English cathedral.

Today, the chapel operates under the university’s Office of Religious Life. It is open to all campus religious groups as a place of worship. The chapel has never been affiliated with a religious denomination.

Princeton University Stadium

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Princeton University Stadium (click image to enlarge). Lee Lilly / Flickr

Princeton University Stadium is home to the Princeton Tigers football team. Opened in 1998, the stadium seats 27,773. It replaced the university’s previous stadium, Palmer Stadium, to accommodate Princeton’s growing football program.

Woolworth Center at Princeton University

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Woolworth Center at Princeton University (click image to enlarge). Lee Lilly / Flickr

The Woolworth Center for Musical Studies is home to the Department of Music and the Mendel Music Library. Woolworth features practice rooms, rehearsal studios, an audio lab, and storage spaces for musical instruments.

Established in 1997, the Mendel Music Library brought together all of Princeton’s music collections under one roof. The three-story library houses books, microforms, printed music, and sound recordings. The library features listening stations, computer stations, photo reproduction equipment, and study rooms.

Alexander Hall at Princeton University

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Alexander Hall at Princeton University (click image to enlarge). Patrick Nouhailler / Flickr

Alexander Hall is a 1,500-seat assembly hall. It was built in 1894 and is named after three generations of Alexander family members who served on the school’s board of trustees. Today the auditorium is the primary performance venue for the Department of Music. It is also home to the annual Princeton University Concert Series.

Downtown Princeton, New Jersey

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Downtown Princeton, New Jersey (click image to enlarge). Patrick Nouhailler / Flickr

Located across from Princeton University, Palmer Square is the heart of Downtown Princeton. It offers a variety of restaurants and shopping opportunities. Its proximity to campus truly gives students the opportunity to explore in an off-campus, suburban setting.

Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University

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Woodrow Wilson School at Princeton University (click image to enlarge). Patrick Nouhailler / Flickr

Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs is located in Robertson Hall. Established in 1930, the school was named in honor of President Woodrow Wilson for his vision of preparing students for leadership in international affairs.  Students in WWS take courses in at least four disciplines, including sociology, psychology, history, politics, economics, and science for public policy.

Frist Student Center at Princeton University

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Frist Student Center at Princeton University (click image to enlarge). Peter Dutton / Flickr

Frist Student Center is the hub for student life on campus. Frist’s food court offers a variety of food in its stations including a deli, pizza and pasta, salads, Mexican food, and more. Additionally, Frist offers recreation in the Mazzo Family Game Room. Frist is home to many student centers including the LGBT Center, the Women’s Center, and the Carl A. Fields Center for Cultural Understanding.

Freedom Fountain at Princeton University

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Freedom Fountain at Princeton University (click image to enlarge). Lee Lilly / Flickr

The Fountain of Freedom, located outside of the Woodrow Wilson School, was built in 1966 and is one of the largest bronze castings in the nation. It is a tradition for seniors to jump into the fountain after they turn in their theses.

Princeton Junction

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Princeton Junction (click image to enlarge). Lee Lilly / Flickr

Princeton Junction is a New Jersey Transit and Amtrak Station located just 10 minutes from the Princeton campus. This short distance allows students to travel with ease during the holiday season.

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Benjamin, Marisa. "Princeton University Photo Tour." ThoughtCo, Nov. 1, 2017, thoughtco.com/princeton-university-photo-tour-788514. Benjamin, Marisa. (2017, November 1). Princeton University Photo Tour. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/princeton-university-photo-tour-788514 Benjamin, Marisa. "Princeton University Photo Tour." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/princeton-university-photo-tour-788514 (accessed January 17, 2018).