Pros and Cons of Being a Doctor

Team of doctors in hospital
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Becoming a doctor takes over eight years of schooling to get full certification and potentially even longer to begin your true medical practice. Investing in medical school is not only a matter of time, though, the cost is also a factor you should consider before choosing to pursue your doctorate in medicine. Before you apply to med school, take the time to consider all the advantages and disadvantages.

That way, you can weigh the two and decide if the pursuit is right for you. 

Benefits

As most know, doctors are required to take a sacred oath — the Hippocratic oath — to ensure that they provide the best medical care, to the fullest extent of their abilities, to all those in need. If you're the type of person who thoroughly enjoys helping others, this career path is chock full of the opportunity to provide service and support to others as well as saving lives. 

For those who value constant mental stimulation, there are few careers whose practical skills are applied to regularly as that of the medical field. Doctors continuously learn on the job as medicine and technology constantly update and evolve. Doctors' minds are constantly on the move, learning and applying new medical science almost every day. 

Not only that, it's rewarding to be a doctor because you typically get the benefit of teaching students and patients about medicine.

The salary is also nothing to scoff at as many doctors make upwards of $100,000 a year. The occupation itself also carries with it a higher social status than most. After all, some say that every mother's dream is for their child to marry a rich, smart doctor!

Disadvantages

Although the salary for being a doctor starts out pretty high and just keeps climbing throughout the rest of your career, most medical students graduate with a large sum of financial debt.

It may take years to pay off the debt and begin to see a profitable life as a doctor. Still, long hours aren't behind you just because you've graduated medical school and completed your internship and residency. It's an arduous process to acquiring a medical license and once you become a doctor on the staff at a hospital you'll pull many overnight and emergency shifts. 

Once you begin practicing, losing a life you couldn't save may take a toll on your emotional well-being. That, paired with the long hours, difficult procedures, stressful work environment, and overwhelming responsibility often lead doctors to depression or at the very least anxiety problems. No matter way you look at it, being a doctor is not easy and it's certainly not for everyone. 

Should I Become a Doctor?

The medical field is full of some of the most respected scientists in the world with doctors being chief among them. But the career is not for everyone. The long hours, huge student debt, stressful work and years of educational preparation can deter those not dedicated to the field. However, being a doctor comes with its fair share of advantages like a high salary, rewarding life work and actually getting to make a difference in the world.

 

Really, it comes down to whether or not you have the dedication and passion for sticking with the medical field for over eight years just to get your career started. If you're ready to take the Hippocratic oath and swear to help the sick and damaged to the fullest of your ability, go ahead and apply to medical school and get started on your path to success. 

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Kuther, Tara, Ph.D. "Pros and Cons of Being a Doctor." ThoughtCo, Oct. 4, 2017, thoughtco.com/pros-and-cons-becoming-a-doctor-1686312. Kuther, Tara, Ph.D. (2017, October 4). Pros and Cons of Being a Doctor. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/pros-and-cons-becoming-a-doctor-1686312 Kuther, Tara, Ph.D. "Pros and Cons of Being a Doctor." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/pros-and-cons-becoming-a-doctor-1686312 (accessed November 19, 2017).