What is the Raelian Movement?

An Introduction to Raelians for Beginners

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The Raelian Movement is a new religious movement and atheistic religion that denies the existence of true supernatural gods. It believes instead that various mythologies (particularly that of the Abrahamic God) are based upon experiences with an alien race called the Elohim.

Various religious prophets and founders such as the Buddha, Jesus, Moses, etc. are also considered prophets of the Elohim. It's believed that they were chosen and educated by the Elohim to reveal their message to humanity in stages.

How the Raelian Movement Started

On December 13, 1973, Claude Vorilhon experienced an alien abduction by the Elohim. They renamed him Rael and instructed him to act as their prophet. Yahweh is the name of the specific Elohim with whom Rael was in contact. He held his first public conference on his revelations on September 19, 1974.

Basic Beliefs

Intelligent Design. Raelians disbelieve in evolution, believing that DNA naturally rejects mutations. They believe the Elohim planted all life on Earth 25,000 years ago through scientific processes. The Elohim were likewise created by another race and one-day humanity will do the same on some other planet.

Immortality Through Cloning. While the Raelians disbelieve in an afterlife, they vigorously pursue scientific inquiries into cloning, which will grant its own form of immortality to those who are cloned. They also believe that the Elohim occasionally clone truly outstanding human individuals and that these clones now live on another planet among the Elohim.

Embracing Sensuality. The Elohim are benevolent creators who wish for us to enjoy the life they have given us. As such, Raelians are strong advocates of sexual freedom between consenting adults. Their attitude toward free love is one of the most well-known facts about them. Raelians, therefore, exhibit a very wide variety of sexual orientations and preferences, including monogamy and even chastity.

Creation of an Embassy. Raelians seek for an embassy to be created on Earth as a neutral space for the Elohim. The Elohim do not wish to force themselves upon humanity, so they will only fully reveal themselves once humanity is ready for and accepting of them.

It is preferred that the embassy is created in Israel since the Hebrews were the first people contacted by the Elohim according to Raelian belief. However, other locations are acceptable if creating it in Israel is not possible.

The act of Apostasy and Baptism. The formal joining of the Raelian Movement requires the Act of Apostasy, denying any previous theistic associations. This is followed by a baptism known as the transmission of the cellular plan. This ritual is understood to communicate the new member's DNA makeup to an Elohim extraterrestrial computer.

Raelian Holidays

The initiation of new members happens four times a year on days that Raelians recognize as holidays.

  • The first Sunday in April - When Raelians believe the Elohim created Adam and Eve.
  • August 6 - The date of the Hiroshima bombing, which began the Age of Apocalypse/Revelation. This date is a remembrance and a warning of our own destructive capabilities, rather than as a celebration. Raelians also believe that this age is the period in which we become capable of truly understanding the Elohim rather than erroneously worshipping them as gods.
  • October 7 - The date that Rael met a variety of past prophets such as Jesus and the Buddha on board an Elohim craft.  During the visit, he received a part of the movement's message.
  • December 13: The date of the first contact between Rael and the Elohim.

Controversies

In 2002, Clonaid, a company run by Raelian bishop Brigitte Boisselier, made claims worldwide that they had succeeded in creating a human clone, who was named Eve. However, Clonaid has refused to allow independent scientists to examine the child or the technology used to create her, ostensibly to protect her privacy.

Lacking any peer verification of the claim, the scientific community generally considers Eve to be a hoax.