Must-Read Comics: Deadpool's Hilarious Heroes for Hire Team-Up

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Deadpool: the true leader of the Heroes for Hire!

Deadpool, Luke Cage, and Iron Fist by Scott Koblish and Val Staples
Deadpool, Luke Cage, and Iron Fist by Scott Koblish and Val Staples. Marvel Comics

There's a lot to love about Deadpool's third ongoing series. I'd go on and on about it, but it turns out I already did exactly that in another article, so click here to see why I think the whole series is worth checking out. My favorite story arc from co-writers Gerry Duggan and Brian Posehn's volume is The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly (which was illustrated by Declan Shalvey and colored by Jordie Bellaire), and odds are I'll get to writing an article about just that story at some point. But right now I want to focus on the two hilarious issues that came out just before the dark and unforgettable story: Deadpool #13 & 14.

The co-writers worked with artist Scott Koblish and colorist Val Staples to send fans on a silly and hysterical trip back to the '70s. Deadpool bumped into the Heroes for Hire (Luke Cage and Iron Fist) back in the duo's 1997 series, but this story reveals the very first time they all met and uses a downright ridiculous (and hilarious) villain to bring them back together in the present era.

02
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Gerry Duggan and Brian Posehn let loose

Luke Cage and The White Man by Scott Koblish and Val Staples
Luke Cage and The White Man by Scott Koblish and Val Staples. Marvel Comics

Right with their first story, Dead Presidents, co-writers Gerry Duggan and Brian Posehn made it obvious they can handle all different kinds of comedy. From over-the-top (and violent) slaptick to clever banter and commentary, I was immediately sold on their talent as comedy writers. The series is full of great laughs, but the "lost" issues - which revisit Deadpool in a previous decade - usually have the biggest laughs because it's when Duggan and Posehn can really let loose. Sure, there's the need to make sure the bigger story isn't totally forgotten, but these issues are where there appears to be no filter whatsoever and no idea is deemed too out-there. From Hitler in a giant mech to a totally absurd vacation, the lost issues unleashed absolutely ridiculous scenarios, and they're all such a good time.

Unsurprisingly, Deadpool's visit to the '70s and his encounter with the Heroes for Hire produces non-stop hilarity. The way he aggravates Luke Cage and Iron Fist is priceless and their reactions to the villain - who I'll talk about in a bit - had my face hurting because I was laughing and smiling so much. No a single page goes by without having something that at least make me smirk. And it's very possible that a certain Marvel aunt makes an appearance, too...

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Artist Scott Koblish and colorist Val Staples are amazing

Luke Cage and Jessica Jones by Scott Koblish and Val Staples
Luke Cage and Jessica Jones by Scott Koblish and Val Staples. Marvel Comics

Scott Koblish, can you do no wrong? This immensely talented artist has given Deadpool's world so much love. He's able to brilliantly present so many different styles in volume three (and he created some shockingly crowded pages over in Deadpool's Art of War). Not only can he duplicate a style shockingly well, the man also delivers on every level. Strong character expressions? Check. A superb handle on action? Check. Extra attention given to environments? Check. His work never fails to impress, and he plays a critical part in making sure the big laughs always deliver - the dialogue just wouldn't be the same without his character working backing them up. Val Staples' coloring adds so much more energy to Koblish's seriously good artwork. Whether it's a bleak moment or some grand and vivid effects, Staples makes sure the pages really grab your attention. Duggan and Posehn bring the sharp script, and Koblish and Staples most definitely bring the excellent visuals.

04
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The White Man's absurdity

Deadpool and the Heroes for Hire by Scott Koblish and Val Stapes
Deadpool and the Heroes for Hire by Scott Koblish and Val Stapes. Marvel Comics

The villain in this story goes by the name "The White Man" and he dresses like a stereotypical pimp. Yes, you read that correctly. In the wrong hands, the jokes could come off as way too obvious and quickly become redundant. Luckily for us, Duggan and Posehn are far too witty to let the absurd antagonist go to waste. I don't want to spoil any of the great jokes (okay, minus the one you can read in the picture above), so I'll just keep it short and say the co-writers' material involving the silly foe is terrific and never gets old. I know humor is subjective and all that, but I find it really hard to believe that a lot of you won't enjoy at least one gag in this two-issue story.

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Leads into one of the best Deadpool stories

Deadpool by Declan Shalvey and Jordie Bellaire
Deadpool by Declan Shalvey and Jordie Bellaire. Marvel Comics

After two issues of pure, over-the-top fun, Deadpool experiences what is unquestionably one of his darkest and most emotional stories ever. The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly is absolutely one of Wade Wilson's must-read stories, and this two-issue team-up with the Heroes for Hire leads right into it. Yes, there's technically a teaser for The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly in an earlier issue in the volume, but this story is when Deadpool finally takes a step towards the bleak and violent tale. These two issues are included in the trade for The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly, and there's a pretty big reason for that! This team-up may just seem like silly fun, but it technically has a development that plays a very big role in Wade's life. 

Well, what are you waiting for? If you haven't read Deadpool #13 and #14 yet, go give 'em a shot. It may not be a mind-blowing story, but it's absolutely capable of filling you with joy. Every time I read these two issues, I crack up like a fool and it immediately brightens my day. Hopefully these two comics will do the same for you.