9 Reasons to Become a Meteorologist

Meteorology is becoming more and more popular, but it's still a fairly uncommon field of study. If you have the smallest inkling of fascination. Here are nine reasons why a career in the weather sciences may be a good fit for you.

(Maybe a 4-year degree isn't feasible for you--that's okay! There are still ways you can contribute to your local and national weather communities.)

01
of 09

Get Paid to be a Weather Geek

A picture of a weather vane
Photo © Len DeLessio / Getty Images

If you're going to talk about troughs and ridges regardless, you might as well get paid to do it, right?

02
of 09

Master the Art of Small Talk

Weather is a go-to conversation starter because it's a universal, neutral topic. As a meteorologist whose business is weather, you can amaze strangers and acquaintances alike with your extensive knowledge. But don't just be a show-off! Take the opportunity to share your insight and communicate the beauty of weather to others. I guarantee they'll not only be fascinated with you, but with weather too...well, at least more fascinated with it than before you said anything.  

03
of 09

Career Longevity Guaranteed

Weather happens 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and 365 days a year, which means there will always be a demand for meteorologists. In fact, employment of atmospheric scientists is projected to grow by 10% from 2012 to 2022. Think of it as built-in job security, courtesy of Mother Nature herself. 

04
of 09

You Were Born to Do This

Being a meteorologist is more of a vocation than it is a profession. In other words, one doesn't randomly choose to study the weather. No, there's usually some reason for doing so--an unforgettable weather event or experience that made a lasting mark on you, a weather phobia, or an innate fascination that has no specific origin but simply has always been a part of you for as long as you can remember.  

Regardless of where your interest originates from, there's a reason why you possess it. Think of it this way: everyone else in the world experiences weather too, but not everyone is an enthusiast. So if you find you're unusually drawn to weather, don't ignore your calling.

05
of 09

Be a Leading Voice on Climate

Climate change and global warming are changing the face of weather patterns and trends as we know it. As we tread into unknown climate territory, more resources will need to be devoted to what our future holds. You can be a part of the solution by educating our world on how climate change will impact our environment, weather, and our health.

06
of 09

Contribute to Weather Advancements

Even in today's modern age of weather alerts via text message, there is still so much to be done in order to better our understanding of weather phenomena and improve forecasts and forecast lead times. 

07
of 09

Help Protect Life and Property

At the heart of being a meteorologist is a spirit of public service. We provide useful information and advice to friends, family, and our communities so that they may take appropriate action to protect their own lives, the lives of loved ones, and the property.
08
of 09

No Ordinary Office Days

There's a saying among us meteorologists that goes "the only thing constant about weather is that it is always changing." The week might start off with fair skies, but by Wednesday, there could be a building threat for excessive heat.

Not only does the weather itself vary, but depending on your career focus, your on-the-job responsibilities might also vary from one day to the next. Why, some days, you may not be in the office at all! From doing "on location" segments to conducting damage surveys

09
of 09

Work Anywhere

The market for some careers isn't as good in some places as it is in others--but not true for meteorology!

Whether you want to stay in your hometown, move to Timbuktu, or go somewhere in-between, your services will always be needed because each of those places (and everywhere else on Earth) has weather. 

The only thing that may somewhat limit where you go is the type of weather you want to specialize in (you wouldn't want to go to Seattle, Washington if you wanted to research tornadoes) and which employer (federal or private) you'd like to work for.