How to Replace a Fuse in Your 2005-2009 Ford Mustang

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How to Replace a Fuse in Your 2005-2009 Ford Mustang

Common replacement fuses and a fuse puller
Common replacement fuses and a fuse puller. Photo © Jonathan P. Lamas

Sooner or later a fuse is going to blow in your Ford Mustang. Replacing a blown out fuse is one of the most basic repairs you can make. The time needed to replace one is minimal, and the level of effort is less than it takes to wash your car. With a few quick steps, and the right tools, you can get your Mustang back in action in no time.

What follows are the steps I took to replace the fuse for the auxiliary power point (12VDC) located on the instrument panel in my 2008 Mustang. It’s important to note, the location of fuse boxes will vary, depending on your year of Ford Mustang. That said, the process of replacing a fuse is generally the same once you've located the box.

You Need

  • Replacement Fuses
  • Fuse Puller
  • Ford Mustang Owner’s Manual

Time Required 5 minutes or less

02
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Prepare Your Tools

Owner's Manual
You can find out the location of the fuse you’ll be replacing, as well as its amp rating, by reviewing your Mustang Owner’s Manual. Photo © Jonathan P. Lamas

The first step in replacing a fuse is to turn off your Mustang. You do not want to replace a fuse when the Mustang is powered on. Turn it off and take the keys out of the ignition. Next, you need to make sure you have the correct replacement fuse on hand. You can find out the location of the fuse you’ll be replacing, as well as its amp rating, by reviewing your Mustang Owner’s Manual.

In this instance, I’ll be replacing the fuse to my auxiliary power point (12VDC). According to my owner’s manual, this 20-amp fuse is located within the high current fuse box housed in the engine compartment of my Mustang. The other fuse compartment for my 2008 Ford Mustang is located in the lower passenger side area behind the kick panel, and contains lower current fuses. You can remove the trim panel cover to access these fuses.

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Raise the Hood

Raise the Hood
In order to replace the fuse for my auxiliary power point (12VDC) I first need to gain access to the engine compartment. Photo © Jonathan P. Lamas
In order to replace the fuse for my auxiliary power point (12VDC) I first need to gain access to the engine compartment. The fuse box for this fuse is housed within the high current fuse box located in the engine compartment of my Mustang. Pop the hood to gain access.
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Disconnect the Battery

Disconnect the Battery
Ford strongly recommends that you disconnect the battery to your Mustang prior to replacing any fuses within the high current fuse box. Photo © Jonathan P. Lamas

Ford strongly recommends that you disconnect the battery to your Mustang prior to replacing any fuses within the high current fuse box. They also recommend that you always replace the cover to the Power Distribution Box before reconnecting the battery or refilling fluid reservoirs. This will help reduce the risk of electrical shock. The fuses within the power distribution box protect your vehicle’s main electrical systems from overloads and are, well, pretty serious business. Tread lightly here.

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Open the Power Distribution Fuse Box

Open the Fuse Box
The inside of the fuse box lid features a diagram showing the location of each fuse relay within the box. Photo © Jonathan P. Lamas

The next step, after disconnecting the battery, is to open the Power Distribution Box. The inside of the fuse box lid features a diagram showing the location of each fuse relay within the box. Use this, as well as your Owner’s Manual, to help you find your relay location. Be careful not to probe the contacts for the fuses and relays in the power distribution box, as this could result in loss of electrical functionality as well as cause other damage to the vehicle’s electrical system.

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Remove the Old Fuse

Remove the Blown Fuse
I carefully grab on to the top of the fuse and pull it from the fuse box. Photo © Jonathan P. Lamas
I’m going to be replacing Fuse/Relay #61, which controls the auxiliary power point in my instrument panel. This is a 20-amp fuse. Using the fuse puller, I carefully grab on to the top of the fuse and pull it from the fuse box.

After removing the fuse, you should inspect it to make sure it has indeed blown. A blown fuse can be identified by a broken wire within the fuse. Sure enough, this fuse has blown. If, upon inspection, the fuse did not appear to have blown, a bigger issue is likely at hand. I would recommend replacing the fuse and taking your car to a qualified mechanic if that occurs.

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Replace the Fuse

Insert a New Fuse
NEVER try using a fuse with a higher amperage rating, as this could result in severe damage to your Mustang. Photo © Jonathan P. Lamas

Now that we’ve removed the blown fuse, we need to replace it with a new one of the same amperage rating. NEVER try using a fuse with a higher amperage rating, as this could result in severe damage to your Mustang, including the potential for a fire. Not good. ALWAYS replace a blown fuse with one of the same amperage.

Locate a new 20-amp fuse, inspect it to make sure it’s in good shape, then carefully place it into the Fuse/Relay #61 location using the fuse pullers. Make sure the fuse is snug within the box.

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Close the Distribution Fuse Box Lid

Close the Lid
After closing the lid, reconnect your battery. Photo © Jonathan P. Lamas

Next, you should close the distribution fuse box lid. After closing the lid, reconnect your battery. After doing this, you can safely start your Mustang to see if the replacement fuse corrected the issue. In this instance, my auxiliary power point is once again working. The problem has been solved. Lower the hood, put away your tools, and you’re all set.

*Note: In all, it took me less than 10 minutes to replace this fuse (disconnecting battery, searching for fuse relay in owner's manual). Had this fuse been located in the interior box behind the kick panel, the replacement process would have been even quicker.