Robert Burns Quotes

Robert Burns - Scottish Romantic poet
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Recognized as one of the greatest Scottish writers of all time, Robert Burns had a great deal to say. He was born in 1759 and is perhaps the most well-known Scots language poet. However much of his poetry was also written in English, which often included the bluntest of his harsh political commentary. His English writing often included Scottish dialects. He was a charismatic pioneer of the Romantics literary movement.

His most famous work is "Auld Lang Syne" which is sung in many countries at the stroke of Midnight on New Year's Eve to help usher in the new year. Burns claims to have transcribed the folk song from an old man who'd had the song passed on to him. 

Political Robert Burns Quote

"While Europe's eye is fix'd on mighty things, The fate of empires and the fall of kings; While quacks of State must each produce his plan, And even children lisp the Rights of Man; Amid this mighty fuss just let me mention, The Rights of Woman merit some attention."

Inspirational Quotes

"Dare to be honest and fear no labor."

"Firmness in enduring and exertion is a character I always wish to possess. I have always despised the whining yelp of complaint and cowardly resolve."

"His locked, lettered, braw brass collar, Shewed him the gentleman and scholar."

"Liberty's in every blow! Let us do or die."

"Man's inhumanity to man makes countless thousands mourn!"

"Nae man can tether time or tide."

"Nursing her wrath to keep it warm."

"Prudent, cautious self-control is wisdom's root."

"Suspense is worse than disappointment."

"There is no such uncertainty as a sure thing."

Nature Quotes

"The daisy's for simplicity and unaffected air."

"The snowdrop and primrose our woodlands adorn, and violets bathe in the wet o' the morn."

Companionship Quotes

"The wide world is all before us - but a world without a friend."

"To liken them to your auld- warld squad, I must needs say comparisons are odd."

"Affliction's sons are brothers in distress; A brother to relieve, how exquisite the bliss!"

"Ah, gentle dames! it gars we greet, To think how mony consels sweet, How mony lengthened, sage advices, The husband frae the wife despises."

"And may you better reck the rede, than ever did th' adviser."

"And there begins a lang digression about the lords o' the creation."