Roman Empire Map

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Western Roman Empire Map - A.D. 395

Map of the Western Roman Empire in A.D. 395.
Western Roman Empire Map - A.D. 395. Perry Castaneda Library

Map of the Western Roman Empire in A.D. 395.

The Roman Empire at its height was enormous. To see it properly requires a larger image than I can provide here, so I'm dividing it where it was divided also in the book (Shepherd's atlas).

The Western section of the Roman Empire map includes Britain, Gaul, Spain, Italy, and northern Africa, although even those areas of the Roman Empire that are recognizable as modern nations had somewhat different borders from today. See the next page for the legend, with a list of provinces, prefectures, and dioceses of the Roman Empire at the end of the 4th century A.D.

Full-size version.

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Eastern Roman Empire Map - A.D. 395

Eastern Roman Empire Map - A.D. 395
Eastern Roman Empire Map - A.D. 395. Perry-CastaƱeda Library

Map of the Eastern Roman Empire in A.D. 395.

This page is the second part of the Map of the Roman Empire that appears beginning on the previous page. Here you see the Eastern Empire, as well as a legend pertaining to both halves of the map. The legend includes the provinces, prefectures, and dioceses of Rome.

Full-size version.

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Rome Map

Campus Martius - Map of the Hydrography and Chorography of Ancient Rome
Campus Martius - Map of the Hydrography and Chorography of Ancient Rome. "The Ruins and Excavations of Ancient Rome," by Rodolfo Lanciani. 1900

On this topography of Rome map, you'll see numbers telling the height of the area, in meters.

The map is labeled hydrography and chorography of ancient Rome. While hydrography may be intuitive -- writing about or mapping of the water system, chorography probably isn't. It comes from the Greek words for country (khora) and writing or -graphy and refers to the delineation of districts. Thus this map shows the areas of ancient Rome, its hills, the walls, and more.

The book from which this map comes, The Ruins and Excavations of Ancient Rome, was published in 1900. Despite its age, it would be worth reading if you want to know about the topography of ancient Rome, including water, soil, walls, and roads.