Sample Behavior Contract for Improving a Challenging Student's Behavior

Some Students Require Additional Structure and Support

behavior contract
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Every classroom has at least a few children who are need of a little extra attention. This may be because they are disrupting the teacher or the other students or just over challenging to handle. Whatever the case may be, teachers have found behavior contacts to be an effective way to reach these types of students. Here are a few quick tips for using behavior contracts in your classroom as well as an example of how you can create one of your own.

Tips for using Behavior Contracts

Here are 3 tips for implementing behavior contracts into your classroom. Make sure that you follow each of these tips to ensure that the contract is a success.

  • Keep them Simple - Organize the contract so that it is simple and easy to for the child to read. Make sure that it is clear and concise and  and the student can easily understand it.
  • Set Attainable Goals - Make sure that they goals are easy for the student to reach. The easier the goal is the easier the child will buy into the contract.
  • Be Consistent - It is essential that you are consistent with the contract. If the student sees that you are not, then they will think that they can get away with inappropriate behavior, and that is the last thing that you want. 

How to Create a Behavior Contract

Student Name:
_________________________
Date:
_________________________
Room:
_________________________

[Student name] will demonstrate good behaviors each day at school.

[Student name] is expected to follow the teacher's directions the first time she asks him to do something. He/she is expected to do so promptly and with a good attitude. Each time that [Student name] does not meet these expectations, he/she will receive a tally mark for the day on the tracking sheet.

These tally marks will determine the rewards and consequences that [Student name] receives, as shown below.

Zero tallies in one day = A chance to roll the die after school for one of the rewards listed below
One tally in one day = Does not get a chance to roll the die that day
Two or more tallies in one day = Loss of recess the next day and/or other consequences as determined by Mrs. Lewis

(number rolled on a die)

1 = One table point for his table
2 = One raffle ticket for monthly class drawing
3 = One piece of candy
4 = Gets to be first in line for the next school day
5 = Gets to help teacher after school that afternoon
6 = Five marbles for the class marble jar

We agree to the terms of this behavior contract as set forth above.

___________________
[Teacher Signature]

___________________
[Parent Signature]

___________________
[Student Signature]

Edited By: Janelle Cox