SAT Scores for Admission to New Jersey Colleges

A Side-by-Side Comparison of Admissions Data for Four-Year New Jersey Colleges

Rockefeller College at Princeton University
Princeton University. Lee Snider / Getty Images

If you want to know what SAT scores you need to get admitted to some of New Jersey's selective colleges and universities, this side-by-side comparison of score data can help. The schools in the table range from extremely selective Princeton University to far more accessible colleges and universities.

Keep in mind that the table presents New Jersey's more selective colleges. The state is home to 55 four-year non-profit colleges and universities, so there are many other options not represented here that have a much lower admissions bar or open admissions.

New Jersey Colleges SAT Scores (mid 50%)
  ERW 25% ERW 75% Math 25% Math 75%
Caldwell University 480 578 480 570
Centenary University 440 540 430 540
College of New Jersey 580 670 580 680
Drew University - - - -
Fairleigh Dickinson - Florham - - - -
Fairleigh Dickinson - Metropolitan - - - -
Georgian Court University 465 570 470 560
Kean University 450 540 440 540
Monmouth University 520 660 520 590
Montclair State University 500 590 490 580
New Jersey City University 430 530 420 530
NJIT 580 670 610 710
Princeton University 710 770 730 800
Ramapo College 530 620 520 620
Rider University 500 600 500 590
Rowan University 520 620 488 603
Rutgers University, Camden 500 590 500 590
Rutgers University, New Brunswick 590 680 600 730
Rutgers University, Newark 510 590 510 600
Seton Hall University 580 650 570 660
Stevens Institute of Technology 640 710 690 770
Stockton University 500 600 500 590
William Paterson University 450 550 440 540
ERW=Evidence-Based Reading and Writing

What These SAT Scores Mean

The table shows scores for the middle 50% of enrolled students. If your scores fall within or above these ranges, you're on target for admission to one of these New Jersey colleges. Realize that these numbers are not cut-offs. 25% of matriculated students had scores at or below the lower numbers in the table.

As an example, for students who enrolled at The College of New Jersey, 50% of students had SAT evidence-based reading and writing scores between 580 and 670. This tells us that 25% of students had scores of 670 or higher, and another 25% had scores of 580 or lower. A student whose score is significantly below 580 would be at a significant disadvantage in the admissions process.

Keep in mind that all of these New Jersey colleges and universities will accept either SAT or ACT scores. The SAT is the more common exam in the state, but the admissions folks don't have a preference. If the ACT is your preferred exam, be sure to check out the ACT version of the table.

Test-Optional Admissions

You'll see that a few schools in the table do not report their SAT scores. This is because they have test-optional admissions. If you're applying to Drew University, you don't need to submit SAT or ACT scores. If you're applying to one of the Fairleigh Dickinson campuses, you need to submit standardized test scores only if your high school GPA is below a B+ (for most programs).

Even when a school has a test-optional admissions policy, you may need to take the SAT and submit your scores for purposes such as course placement, advising, NCAA reporting, and scholarship applications. Also, if you have strong scores, it is to your advantage to submit them even if a college is test-optional.

Holistic Admissions

Realize, of course, that SAT scores are just one part of the application. Most of the schools in the table have holistic admissions, so they are looking at more than numerical measures such as your SAT scores and GPA. The admissions officers at many of these New Jersey colleges will also want to see a strong academic record, a winning essay, meaningful extracurricular activities and good letters of recommendation. Strengths in these areas can help make up for SAT scores that are less than ideal.

A Final Word on SAT Scores for New Jersey Colleges

While a couple schools such as Princeton and Stevens are highly selective and tend to enroll students with SAT scores that are significantly above average, these schools are not the norm. You have plenty of excellent options even if you have low SAT scores.

Data Source: The National Center for Education Statistics.