5 Genealogical Journals You Should Be Reading

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Powell, Kimberly. "5 Genealogical Journals You Should Be Reading." ThoughtCo, Mar. 3, 2017, thoughtco.com/scholarly-genealogical-journals-1421857. Powell, Kimberly. (2017, March 3). 5 Genealogical Journals You Should Be Reading. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/scholarly-genealogical-journals-1421857 Powell, Kimberly. "5 Genealogical Journals You Should Be Reading." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/scholarly-genealogical-journals-1421857 (accessed September 22, 2017).

Genealogical and historical society journals, especially the ones published at the state, province, or national level, are often at the forefront of genealogical research and standards. Case studies and family histories usually make up the bulk of the content, presenting new methodologies and sources, untangling the mysteries caused by men of the same name, and overcoming the road blocks of non-extant or hard-to-access sources.

Whether you want to expand your genealogical knowledge, or are considering submitting as an author, these genealogical journals are known and respected for their high-quality genealogical content. Most of the websites provide basic information about the journal and how to subscribe. Look also for sample issues, writer guidelines, and other useful information.

Related: Reading Genealogical Case Studies: Learning by Example

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Founded in 1922 by Donald Lines Jacobus, TAG is edited by Nathaniel Lane Taylor, PhD, FASG, a "historian with a special interest in the history of genealogy"; Joseph C. Anderson II, FASG, who is also editor of The Maine Genealogist; and Roger D. Joslyn, CG, FASG. TAG is considered one of the premiere genealogical journals, emphasizing "carefully documented compiled genealogy and analyses of difficult genealogical problems, all directed toward providing serious genealogists with examples of how they too might solve such problems."

Back issues of The American Genealogist are also available online. Members of the New England Historic Genealogical Society have online access to digitized copies of Volumes 1–84 (Note: Volumes 1–8, covering the years 1922–1932, are in a separate database under the name “Families of Ancient New Haven.”). Back issues of TAG can be keyword searched on HathiTrust Digital Library, although this will only return a list of pages on which your keyword appears. The actual content will need to be accessed in another manner. More »

The National Genealogical Society Quarterly, published since 1912, emphasizes "scholarship, readability, and practical help in genealogical problem solving." The material covered in this well-respected genealogical journal covers all regions of the United States, and all ethnic groups. Expect to find primarily case studies, methodologies, and book reviews in the current editions, although the NGSQ has also published compiled genealogies and previously unpublished source materials. The NGSQ Guidelines for Writers is also available online. The journal is currently edited by Thomas W. Jones, PhD, CG, CGL, FASG, FUGA, FNGS, and Melinde Lutz Byrne, CG, FASG.

Digitized back issues of the NGSQ (1974, 1976, 1978-current) are available to members of NGS in the online Members Only area. The NGSQ Index is also available online for free for both members and non-members. More »

Published quarterly since 1847, the New England Historical and Genealogical Register is the oldest American genealogical journal, and still considered a flagship journal of American genealogy. Currently edited by Henry B. Hoff, CG, FASG, the journal emphasizes New England families through authoritative compiled genealogies, as well as articles focusing on solving genealogical problems applicable to all genealogists. For authors, style and submission guidelines can be found on their website as well.

Digitized back issues of the Register are available to members of NEHGS on the American Ancestors website. More »

Recognized as the most important journal for New York genealogical research, The Record has been published quarterly and continuously since 1870. The Record, edited by Karen Mauer Jones, CG, FGBS, features compiled genealogies, solutions to genealogical problems, articles on unique source materials, and book reviews. The focus is obviously on New York families, but articles often extend documentation of the origins of these families in other states and countries, or of their migration into states across the U.S.

Digitized back issues of The Record are available online to members of the New York Genealogical and Biographical Society (NYG&B). Many of the older volumes are also available for free online through the Internet Archive. The NYG&B website also includes Detailed Guidelines for Submissions to the Record. More »

Published twice yearly and edited by Charles M. Hansen and Gale Ion Harris, The Genealogist is considered one of the most prestigious journals in the field of genealogy, publishing high-quality genealogical articles including single-family studies, compiled genealogies, and articles that solve specific problems. This journal also includes pieces that, due to length (short or long), may not meet the requirements of other genealogical journals.

The Genealogist is published by the American Society of Genealogists, an honorary society limited to fifty life-time members designated as Fellows (identified by the initials FASG). More »

Format
mla apa chicago
Your Citation
Powell, Kimberly. "5 Genealogical Journals You Should Be Reading." ThoughtCo, Mar. 3, 2017, thoughtco.com/scholarly-genealogical-journals-1421857. Powell, Kimberly. (2017, March 3). 5 Genealogical Journals You Should Be Reading. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/scholarly-genealogical-journals-1421857 Powell, Kimberly. "5 Genealogical Journals You Should Be Reading." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/scholarly-genealogical-journals-1421857 (accessed September 22, 2017).