Sejima + Nishizawa (SANAA) - Portfolio of Selected Works

01
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Ogasawara Museum (O-Museum)

O-Museum in Nagano, Japan. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, architects.
Architects: Sejima + Nishizawa and Associates (SANAA) Ogasawara Museum, the O-Museum, in Nagano, Japan. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, architects. Completed in 1999. Photo ©Hisao Suzuki, Courtesy of SANAA

Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, Pritzker Prize-Winning Architects

The Tokyo-based firm, Sejima + Nishizawa and Associates (SANAA), is praised for designing powerful, minimalist buildings using common, everyday materials. Partners Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa won the 2010 Pritzker Architecture Prize for their works. Find photos here.

Nagano, Japan

Ogasawara Museum (the O-Museum) perches on a mountainside plateau where a 14th century castle once stood. The shape of the O-Museum follows the contours of the land.

Rather than build directly on the foundation of the medieval castle, architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa elevated the O-Museum above the ground. Visitors enter the lobby via a square ramp. A large window overlooks the castle remains. Because the O-Museum is elevated, its walls are protected from dampness rising from the earth.

The Ogasawara Museum is one of the earliest collaborations by the 2010 Pritzker-winning team. The project began in 1995 and was completed in 1999.

02
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Christian Dior Building

Christian Dior Building in Tokyo, Japan. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, architects.
Architects: Sejima + Nishizawa and Associates (SANAA) Christian Dior Building in Tokyo, Japan. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, architects. Completed in 2003. Photo ©Hisao Suzuki, Courtesy of SANAA

Omotesando Avenue, Tokyo, Japan

Architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa faced rigid building codes when they designed the Christian Dior store in Tokyo, Japan. The building could be no higher than 100 feet. To maximize space, the architects designed the building with floors of variable heights. Retail floors were alternated with utilitarian spaces. Exterior walls were constructed of glass with translucent acrylic screens.

The Christian Dior store was completed in 2003.

03
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21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art

21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa, Japan. Sejima + Nishizawa. SANAA, architects.
Architects: Sejima + Nishizawa and Associates (SANAA) 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art in Kanazawa, Japan. Sejima + Nishizawa of SANAA, architects. Completed in 2004. Photo © Junko Kimura/Getty Images

Kanazawa, on the north coast of Japan

The circular 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art has a diameter of 112.5 meters with a transparent wall all around. The museum can be entered at many places and explored from all directions. Visitors can walk completely around the building inside the glass perimeter.

The 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art has central exhibition spaces surrounded by areas for municipal services such as a library, a workshop for children, and a conference room. There are four inner courtyards enclosed by glass, and many of the rooms have skylights to provide diffused natural light.

The museum project began in 1999 and was completed in 2004.

04
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Zollverein School of Management and Design

Zollverein School of Management and Design. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, architects.
Architects: Sejima + Nishizawa and Associates (SANAA) Zollverein School of Management and Design in Essen, Germany. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, architects. Completed in 2006. Photo ©Hisao Suzuki, Courtesy of SANAA

Essen, Germany

Located on the site of an old coal mine in a suburban area near a carbon factory, the Zollverein School of Management and Design appears massive in contrast to surrounding houses and industrial buildings.

The school building is an architectural celebration of the cube. Measuring about 115 feet on each side, the building is almost perfectly square. The four floors are of varying heights with an asymmetrical arrangement of square windows of varying sizes. The first floor of the Zollverein School is an open study area with no partitions.

Japanese architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa began working on the Zollverein School in 2003. The project was completed in 2006.

05
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Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art

Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, architects.
Architects: Sejima + Nishizawa and Associates (SANAA) Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art in Toledo, Ohio. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, architects. Completed in 2006. Photo ©Hisao Suzuki, Courtesy of SANAA

Toledo, Ohio

When asked to design an addition for the art museum in Toledo, Ohio, Japanese architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa conceived a single-story plan based on a grid of interlocking glass rectangles. Each room has curved glass walls allowing views of adjacent spaces. The glass walls and interior courtyards create a sense of transparency that seems especially appropriate for the museum's function. The Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art houses art glass and serves as a a laboratory and glass-making foundry.

Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa began working on the Glass Pavilion at the Toledo Museum of Art in 2001. The project was completed in 2006.

06
of 10

Naoshima Ferry Terminal

Naoshima Ferry Terminal in Naoshima, Kagawa, Japan. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, architects.
Architects: Sejima + Nishizawa and Associates (SANAA) Naoshima Ferry Terminal on Naoshima, Kagawa, Japan. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, architects. Completed in 2006. Photo ©Hisao Suzuki, Courtesy of SANAA

Naoshima, Kagawa, Japan

The Naoshima Ferry Terminal is set on a small island in the Inland Sea of Japan. The terminal area is sheltered by a large roof measuring approximately 39,000 square feet. Glass walls enclose the waiting area, cafe, and visitors center.

Architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa began the project in 2003. The Naoshima Ferry Terminal was completed in 2006.

07
of 10

New Museum of Contemporary Art

New Museum of Contemporary Art, Sejima and Nishizawa, architects.
Architects: Sejima + Nishizawa and Associates (SANAA) New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York City, Sejima and Nishizawa, architects. Completed 2007. Photo by Flickr Member laurenatclemson/Lauren, Creative Commons Attribution 2.0

New York City

The New Museum of Contemporary Art is a high-rise exhibition space in Manhattan, New York City. Architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa designed the building with staggered floors to maximize wall space. The overlapping floors provides room for skylights and terraces.

The museum project begun in 2003 and opened in 2007.

08
of 10

Stadstheater Almere, De Kunstlinie Theater and Cultural Center

DeKunstlinie Theater and Cultural Center in Almere, Netherlands. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa
Architects: Sejima + Nishizawa and Associates (SANAA) Stadstheater Almere, "De Kunstlinie" Theater and Cultural Center, in Almere, Netherlands. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, architects. Completed in 2007. Photo ©Hisao Suzuki, Courtesy of SANAA

Almere, Netherlands

Located on a lake just west of Amsterdam in the Netherlands, Stadstheater Almere, De Kunstlinie, is part of a master plan developed by the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA). The building is a municipal theater and cultural center designed to serve both professional and amateur artists.

Japanese architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa were selected for the project in 1998. De Kunstlinie was completed in 2007.

09
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Ninth Serpentine Gallery Pavilion

Ninth Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in London, England. Sejima + Nishizawa of SANAA, architects.
Architects: Sejima + Nishizawa and Associates (SANAA) Ninth Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in London, England. Sejima + Nishizawa of SANAA, architects. 2009. Photo © Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

London, England

Designed by Japanese architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, this pavilion was the ninth of a series at the Serpentine Gallery in London, England. The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion was built in 2009 and remained on the gallery lawn for three months.

Learn More: 2009 Pavilion by Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa >>>

10
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Rolex Learning Center, Ecole Polytechnique Federale (EPFL)

Rolex Learning Center, Ecole Polytechnique Federale. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, architects.
Architects: Sejima + Nishizawa and Associates (SANAA) The Rolex Learning Center, Ecole Polytechnique Federale, in Lausanne, Switzerland. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa, architects. Completed in 2009. Photo ©Hisao Suzuki, Courtesy of SANAA

Lausanne, Switzerland

The Rolex Learning Center, Ecole Polytechnique Federale, is a vast complex with a library, a center for language studies, offices, a cafeteria, a restaurant, and a lobby. By giving the roof and the floor an undulating shape, architects Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa created seven distinct courtyards, each with its own atmosphere. Visitors can approach the Rolex Learning Center from four directions by walking under an undulating floor slab.

Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa began working on the Rolex Learning Center in 2005. The project was completed in 2009.

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Craven, Jackie. "Sejima + Nishizawa (SANAA) - Portfolio of Selected Works." ThoughtCo, Aug. 11, 2016, thoughtco.com/sejima-and-nishizawa-sanaa-architecture-portfolio-4065268. Craven, Jackie. (2016, August 11). Sejima + Nishizawa (SANAA) - Portfolio of Selected Works. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/sejima-and-nishizawa-sanaa-architecture-portfolio-4065268 Craven, Jackie. "Sejima + Nishizawa (SANAA) - Portfolio of Selected Works." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/sejima-and-nishizawa-sanaa-architecture-portfolio-4065268 (accessed November 20, 2017).