Zarathustra

The Persian Prophet of Zoroastrianism

Section From The School of Athens, by Raphael. Zoroaster holding a globe talking with Ptolemy.
Section From The School of Athens, by Raphael (1509), showing Zoroaster holding a globe talking with Ptolemy. Public Domain. Courtesy of Wikipedia.

Etymology

Zarathustra, whose name may mean 'he who can handle camels,' was a prophet and probably a priest from probably eastern Iran or, possibly, Azerbaijan or Raga (near modern Tehran). He may have been killed in Bactria. He reformed the pantheon of the Persians creating the Zoroastrian religion. The Gathas (poems) contain his teachings.

Zarathustra may have been born in the 7th or 6th century B.C.

or around 1200 B.C. It is commonly accepted that he was a real person and that he predates the Achaemenids. Zarathustra claimed to have seen the god Ahura Mazda in a vision. He became a role model for his followers.

Reference: The Heritage of Persia, by Richard N. Frye.

Alternate Spellings: Zarathushtra, Zarathustra, Zoroaster