Sikh Wedding Ceremony Illustrated

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Anand Karaj Ceremony Illustrated

Bridesmaids in Wedding Colors
Sikh Wedding Party and Bridesmaids in Wedding Colors. Photo © [S Khalsa]

The Sikh wedding ceremony is conducted in the presence of Sikhism's holy scripture Guru Granth Sahib according to Anand Karaj rites outlined the Sikh code of conduct. Therefore the Anand Karaj ceremony usually takes place in the gurdwara, or a sanctioned wedding hall especially reserved for Sikh matrimonial rites where no activities ever occur which would be considered improper protocol in the presence of Guru Granth Sahib, or in the gurdwara, such as smoking, drinking, dancing, or serving meat.

The Anand Karaj ceremony illustrated here portrays the Gursikh wedding of Amritdhari bridal couple Har Prit Singh and Pavan Deep Kaur with their gracious consent. The wedding took place on December 24, 2011 from 9:30 am to 1 pm in Gurdwara Sahib El Sobrante located at 3550 Hillcrest Rd. El Sobrante, CA 94803.

The bride, Pavan Deep Kaur, prepared an outline as a guide for guests to her wedding and would like to share it with you as an honored virtual wedding guest to her illustrated Anand Karaj marriage ceremony.

The Sikh Marriage Ceremony by Pavan Deep Kaur
"They are not said to be husband and wife, who merely sit together. Rather they alone are called husband and wife, who have one soul in two bodies." (Guru Amar Das, Pauri, pg. 788 Guru Granth Sahib)
"Sikhism is a relatively new religion with respect to the other major world religions. Founded by Guru Nanak Dev in the late 1400's, it evolved under the leadership of nine other Gurus to become the egalitarian, monotheistic faith it is today.
Under the guidance of the tenth guru, Guru Gobind Singh, the role of the spiritual leader of the Sikhs was forever entrusted to the Guru Granth Sahib, our holy book. The Guru Granth Sahib, considered by all the Sikhs as their living Guru, teaches the Sikh way of life stressing belief in one God, equality of all mankind and union with God through the service of his creation and by remembering His name.
Anand Karaj is the name of the Sikh Marriage ceremony, meaning "Blissful Union" or "Joyful Union." It was written by Guru Ram Das in 1552. This form of marriage was formally legalized in India by the passing of the Anand Marriage Act in 1909.
The Sikh religion gives a very high regard to the state of marriage as evidenced by the marriage of the Gurus. They preached and practiced that you can be a married householder and have communion with God by earning your livelihood, serving the community and remembering His name." 
"Q: What time should I arrive at the gurdwara (Sikh temple)?"
"A: You should plan on arriving around 9:30 a.m. at which time, if all goes according to plan, the groom and his family will arrive to meet the bride’s family. Guests should assemble on the front steps at the entrance to the gurdwara adjacent to the Nishan Sahib (flag pole) or on the patio gallery where the formal introduction of the two families (Milni) will take place. If the parking lot is full, parking is available on streets outside gate, wherever you can find a place." - Pavan Deep Kaur

Here you see the bridal couple sitting before the palki where Guru Granth Sahib is installed. To their right, attired in turquoise gowns and white turbans, are the wedding party bridesmaids and matrons as well as female family members, and guests. In the foreground, to the left of the bridal couple, are the male members of the wedding party.

More:
Anand Karaj Sikhism Wedding Ceremony Guide
Eleven Sikhism Matrimonial Dos and Don'ts
All About Sikh Wedding Ceremony and Marriage Customs

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Bridal Procession Enters Gurdwara For Anand Karaj Marriage Ceremony

Bridal Procession Singhs in Wedding Colors
Bridal Procession Singhs in Wedding Colors. Photo © [S Khalsa]

In Sikhism, many marriages are arranged according to tradition for the prospective bride and groom by a Vichola, or a go between, who represents the families. Even in modern times bride and groom may meet for the first time on their wedding day. In the Sikh tradition, a groom's family and wedding party known as Barat meets with the bride's family at the gurdwara in a custom known as milni. Gifts may be exchanged and tea, non-alcoholic beverages, with tasty sweets and salty snacks, or a light breakfast, offered in the gurdwara reception area, or langar hall.

Devout Gursikh families prepare for the coming nuptials by inviting sangat and family to help conduct a complete reading of Guru Granth Sahib paath and for devotional singing of day time kirtan, or all night rain sabaee kirtan, either prior to the wedding, or immediately following the wedding.

In Western countries such as America, where Sikhism is relatively new, guests of the bridal couple may wonder what to wear to a Sikh wedding.

Attending a Sikh Wedding by Pavan Deep Kaur:
"Below is a brief guide to what to expect and what to wear at a Sikh wedding. 
1. Milni: Milni (means "formal meeting of the families"). The Ardaas (standing prayer) will be performed by the Granthi (priest) followed by formal introductions of the main players in the families.
2. Tea: Tea, with breakfast, and sweets will be served and are normally taken sitting on the floor or standing.
3. Proper Attire and Behavior for the gurdwara: [Attire]  People of all religious backgrounds are welcomed into a Sikh gurdwara. All visitors must remove their shoes and cover their head with a headscarf before entering the gurdwara.  Headscarves will be provided at the gurdwara; however, guests are encouraged to bring their own scarf or handkerchief (one that is big enough to cover your entire head).
Please dress appropriately so that you can sit, both comfortably and with decency, on the carpeted floor. It is recommended that you wear loose fitting clothing which covers your legs and is not excessively revealing. Visitors are also forbidden to go into the gurdwara while they are intoxicated or in possession of alcohol, tobacco or meat products. Men and women sit on different sides of the hall, separated in the middle by a pathway that leads to the Guru Granth Sahib." 
"Q: I've never been to a Sikh wedding, what should I wear? Are there any particular colors to avoid wearing?"
"A: Most guests will be dressed in traditional Indian attire usually consisting of bright, festive colors. Women should avoid wearing all white or all black outfits. The reason being is that these colors are traditionally worn by women during times of mourning. Most women will wear a salwaar kameez while men will wear either a kurtah pajama or a traditional western style suit. However, this is strictly optional and a matter of individual choice. You may dress as you please, however, please note that dress code itself is conservative. Shorts, mini-skirts, tight or see-through attire are strongly discouraged. You should dress so you can sit comfortably and with decency on the carpeted floor. Loose fitting clothing that covers your legs is strongly recommended." - Pavan Deep Kaur

Here you see the younger male members of the bridal party attired in white bana with turquoise turbans as they enter the gurdwara in queue to bow before Guru Granth Sahib.

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Bride Entrance In Gurdwara For Anand Karaj Marriage Ceremony

The bride enters the gurdwara with her family for the wedding ceremony.
The bride enters the gurdwara with her family for the wedding ceremony. Photo © [S Khalsa]

In a Sikh wedding, the bride enters the gurdwara, or sanctioned wedding hall, along with her entire family. However the aisle is not cleared for her appearance, nor is any particular wedding march music played, as occurs in a Western wedding.

Attending a Sikh Wedding by Pavan Deep Kaur Continued:
3. cont. Proper Attire and Behavior for the Gurdwara: [Behavior] "Upon first entering the large prayer room (called the Darbar Sahib); a bow to the Guru Granth Sahib (the holy book) shows respect to the 'Guru Sahib'. It is usually customary for one to make a small donation, usually a dollar or two in front of the main altar. If for any reason you feel uncomfortable partaking in this custom, you may skip this portion and quietly be seated.
Once seated, guests will be required to sit down on the carpeted floor (preferably with their legs folded inward or cross-legged). At no point should guests point their feet or sit with their backs facing directly towards the main altar that houses the Guru Granth Sahib as this is considered a strong sign of disrespect." - Pavan Deep Kaur

Here you see the bride and her family pay their respects to Guru Granth Sahib before sitting with sangat. The bride is attired in a yellow gown and white turban.

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Bride and Groom Sit Together for Anand Karaj Matrimonial Rites

Wedding Ceremony Commences With Bride and Groom Sitting Side By Side
Wedding Ceremony Commences With Bride and Groom Sitting Side By Side. Photo © [S Khalsa]

The bride joins the groom in the gurdwara, or sanctioned wedding hall, to sit before Guru Granth Sahib to signify the start of the Anand Karaj wedding ceremony.

Attending a Sikh Wedding by Pavan Deep Kaur Continued:
"4. Main Wedding Ceremony: The marriage ceremony will begin with the congregation gathering in front of the Guru Granth Sahib and ragis (musical priests) singing a compilation of holy hymns. The groom takes his seat in front of the main altar where the Guru Granth Sahib is seated and shortly afterwards, the bride will take her place on his left." - Pavan Deep Kaur

Here you see the bride and groom as they sit together for the first time in the Anand Karaj marriage ceremony as the last of the wedding guests enter. The groom is attired in a golden wedding chola and yellow turban to match the bridal gown.

More:
Anand Karaj Wedding Ceremony Program Guide

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Bride and Groom Stand for Ardas in Anand Karaj Marriage Ceremony

Bride and Groom Stand for Ardas
Bride and Groom Stand for Ardas. Photo © [S Khalsa]

The bride and groom stand together for ardas, a prayer of petition for the Guru's blessing on the Anand Kaaj marriage ceremony.

Attending a Sikh Wedding by Pavan Deep Kaur Continued:
"4. cont. Main Wedding Ceremony: "The ceremony will be conducted by the granthi (priest). The priest will ask the couple to stand up as well as their parents for a silent ardas (prayer). The rest of the congregation will remain quietly seated at this time. This family ardas is a formal prayer by the family to seek Guru Sahib's permission to start the ceremony." - Pavan Deep Kaur

Here you see the bride and groom stand with their families with an officiating person (in the foreground) who recites ardas on behalf of the couple and their marriage. An ardas has also been previously done individually for both the bride and the groom with their respective families.

Many of the bride's party are attired in turquoise, while the groom's party are wearing red turbans. Red is a traditional color in Indian and Sikh weddings. However many Gursikh devotees like this bridal couple opt to wear yellow, gold, shades of orange, pink and even blue. White is very seldom worn by a Sikh bride with the exception of Western converts.

More:
Significance of Colors in Sikhism.

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Role of Guru Granth in the Anand Karaj Ceremony

Bridal Couple Faces Guru Granth
The Granthi Reads The Marriage Hymns From Guru Granth Sahib. Photo © [S Khalsa]

All of the Anand Karaj matrimonial hymns are selections read from the Gurmukhi scripture of Guru Granth Sahib by the granthi, or presiding priest. Gurmukhi script is nearly identical to the Punjabi alphabet, however Gurmukhi language is poetic, and though similar to Punjabi, Gurmukhi is an ancient language which exists only in Sikh scripture. Gurmukhi has been translated into Punjabi, Hindi (Dev Gandhari), English, and Spanish. Aside from the Gurmukhi hymns, the Anand Karaj ceremony maybe conducted in the bridal couple's native language.

Attending a Sikh Wedding by Pavan Deep Kaur Continued.
"After the ardas, the priest will read the Guru's orders to the congregation." 
"Q: What language will your wedding ceremony be conducted in?"
"A: The scripture reading and hymn singing will be done in Punjabi [Gurmukhi], however, for those guests who wish to follow along, we will do our utmost to ensure that English translations are made available whenever possible on big screens on the two front sides of the main hall." - Pavan Deep Kaur

Here you see the granthi reading from the Gurmukhi scripture of Guru Granth Sahib. The granthi reads the Hukam and Anand Karaj wedding hymns from the scripture of Guru Granth Sahib. The Guru is resting atop a manj, or platform covered with cushions and draped with rumala coverlets. A canopy is suspended from the golden palki decorative frame. A chaur sahib, or fly whisk, rests at the side of the scripture.

The Granthi reads aloud the appropriate hymns which are then sung by the ragis:

  • "Keeta Loree-ai Kaam" meaning, "Tell Your Wishes to the Lord."
  • "Dhan Pir Eh Na Akhee-an" meaning, "One Light Illumines Two Bodies."

More:
All About The Guru Granth, Sikhism's Holy Scripture

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Bridal Couple Bow Before Guru Granth in Anand Karaj Wedding Rites

Bridal Couple Bow Before Guru Granth
Bridal Couple Bow Before Guru Granth. Photo © [S Khalsa]

The bride and groom bow in obeisance to show respect to, and seek the blessing of Guru Granth Sahib for their Anand Karaj marriage ceremony.

Attending a Sikh Wedding by Pavan Deep Kaur Continued:
"4. cont. Main Wedding Ceremony: Every time the bride and groom arise or sit down during the ceremony they will bow down to Sri Guru Granth Sahib out of respect by touching their foreheads to the ground." - Pavan Deep Kaur

Here you see the bride and groom bow as one before the Guru Granth Sahib whose scripture is read aloud and whose hymns are sung in the bonding of the couple with the divine in the Anand Karaj wedding rites.

After bowing, the bridal couple sit side by side.

More:
Anand Karaj Wedding Ceremony Program Guide

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Bride and Groom Joined With Palla in Anand Karaj Matrimonial Ceremony

Bride and Groom Joined With Palla
Bride and Groom Joined With Palla. Photo © [S Khalsa]

In the Anand Karaj matrimonial ceremony, bride and broom are tethered together by the palla a scarf or length of turban.

Attending a Sikh Wedding by Pavan Deep Kaur Continued:
"4. cont. Main Wedding Ceremony: The father of the bride [or other relative of bride or groom] then places one end of a scarf or sash worn by the groom over his shoulders in his daughter's hand signifying that she is now leaving his care to join her husband." - Pavan Deep Kaur

Here you see the bridal couple joined by the palla. The groom holds one end while the bride holds the other. The palla unites bride and groom throughout the Anand Karaj ceremony. ragis sing the hymn, "Pallai Taiddai Laagee" meaning, "I Grasp Hold of Your Hem."

More:
Anand Karaj Wedding Ceremony Program Guide

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Granthi Reads Lavan From Guru Granth in Anand Karaj Ceremony

Granthi Reads Guru Granth Sahib Aloud to Bridal Couple
Granthi Reads Guru Granth Sahib Aloud to Bridal Couple. Photo © [S Khalsa]

The Anand Karaj wedding rites center around the four hymns of Laav (sounds like love) which describe the ever deepening relationship of divine union between the soul bride and her spiritual groom Waheguru. The granthi reads the hymns of Laav aloud.

Attending a Sikh Wedding by Pavan Deep Kaur Continued:
"4. cont. Main Wedding Ceremony: The priest reads the Lavan (hymns composed by Guru Raam Das)." - Pavan Deep Kaur

Here you see the granthi reading hymns from Guru Granth Sahib to the bridal couple who have been joined together by the palla.

More:
Lavan, the Four Wedding Round Hymns
"Laav" - "The Four Wedding Rounds"

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Sikh Bridal Couple Begin Their First Wedding Round

Bride and Groom Begin Wedding Rounds
Bride and Groom Begin Wedding Rounds. Photo © [S Khalsa]]

During the Anand Karaj wedding ceremony, the Sikh bridal couple performs parkarma, walking around the scripture of Guru Granth Sahib four times in all.

Attending a Sikh Wedding by Pavan Deep Kaur Continued:
"4. cont. Main Wedding Ceremony: The Lavan is composed of four stanzas. They describe the progression of love between a husband and wife, which is analogous to that between the soul (bride) and God (the husband)." - Pavan Deep Kaur

Here you see the bridal couple tethered by the palla begin the first round of the Lavan. Though they may meet for the first time on their wedding day, the Sikh marriage is meant to last for the couple's entire lifetime. The first step of the wedding round is the first of a life time of adjustments that a Sikh couple makes together.

More:
Lavan, the Four Wedding Round Hymns"
"Laav" - "The Four Wedding Rounds"

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Ragis Sing Wedding Round Hymns of Lavan in Anand Karaj Rites

Wedding Rounds With Ragis
Wedding Rounds With Ragis. Photo © [S Khalsa]

After the Granthi has read the hymns of the first Laav in the Anand Karaj rites, the bridal couple begin parkarma, making the wedding rounds by walking clockwise around Guru Granth Sahib as the ragis sing the Lavan verses.

Attending a Sikh Wedding by Pavan Deep Kaur Continued:
"4. cont. Main Wedding Ceremony: After the conclusion of the recitation of each stanza [by the granthi], the groom, followed by the bride holding the end of the scarf, goes around the Guru Granth Sahib in a clockwise direction while the ragis sing the same recited Lavan stanza." - Pavan Deep Kaur

Here you see the Ragis to the right of the bridal couple. Ragis sing the wedding hymns in the original Gurmukhi. Just above the Ragis is a screen where translations of the hymns are projected for the wedding guests.

The bridal couple begin their first parkarma walking around clockwise to the left of Guru Granth Sahib. The groom walks ahead with the bride following behind. Each hold their end of the palla. Bride and groom both have an equally important role in the marriage. Neither is subservient to the other. Marriage in Sikhism is like a carriage which depends on each of its parts in place to function properly. Depending on perspective, it could be said the groom pulls the carriage while the bride is the driver and holds the leads to guide the way. The palla is a tether which binds the couple as they begin wedded life united in understanding that their respective roles are key to insuring a successful marriage

"Har peh-larr-ee laav par-vir-tee karam drirr-aa-i-aa bal raam jeeo||
In the first round of the marriage ceremony, the Lord sets out His Instructions for performing the daily duties of married life." SGGS||773

More:
Lavan, the Four Wedding Rounds"
"Laav" Song of the Sikh Marriage, "The Four Wedding Round Hymns"

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Groom Carries Sword in Anand Karaj Ceremony

Sikh Groom With Siri Sahib Sword
Sikh Groom With Siri Sahib Sword. Photo © [S Khalsa]

The Sikhism code of conduct, Sikh Reht Maryada published by SGPC and translated by Kulraj Singh, stipulates that the groom is to lead the bride through the wedding rounds. In accordance with the code of conduct, the officiating priest counsels the groom to protect and regard his wife as his "better half", and counsels the bride to regard her husband as "master of her love and trust."

Here you see the the bride holding the palla and following the groom who is carrying a Siri Sahib, or long sword, symbolic of his role as protector and Khalsa warrior. The bridal couple are walking behind the Guru Granth Sahib as they make the second parkarma lap in a single round of, four in all, wedding rounds as the hymns of Lavan being are sung by Ragis.

More:
Lavan, the Four Wedding Round Hymns"
"Laav" - "The Four Wedding Rounds"

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Bridal Attire in the Anand Karaj Ceremony

Bride and Groom in Anand Karaj Rites
Bride and Groom in Anand Karaj Rites. Photo © [S Khalsa]

The Gursikh bride and groom who keep accordance with the Sikhism code of conduct do not veil their heads or faces with any kind of floral or gilded apparatus. Neither do they decorate their bodies with red threads. A Gursikh bride does not follow the tradition of painting her hands or feet with menhdi, henna, in an attempt to appeal to her groom.

Bhagat Kabir Ji an author of Guru Granth Sahib wrote of mehndi as a useless rite for the soul bride longing to attract the notice of the divine groom:

" Kabeer mehdhee kar Kai ghaaliaa aap peesaa-e peesaa-e||
Kabir grinding grinding I have ground myself into henna paste.

Tai seh baat na poochhee-aa kabhu na laa-ee paa-e ||65||
But you O my groom (God) have neither noticed me, nor ever applied me to your feet." SGGS||1267

Here you see the bride with her eyes demurely cast downward as she keeps pace with the groom. The bridal couple are attired in coordinating bridal apparel. He in a yellow turban and she in a yellow salvar kameez, bridal gown and pantalettes. He in a golden groom's chola and pajama pantaloons and she with a chunni, bridal veil embroidered with golden threads adorning a white turban.

More:
Why Do Sikhs Wear Turbans?
Traditional Ceremonial Attire of Sikhs
Eleven Sikhism Matrimonial Dos and Don'ts
All About the Sikhism Code of Conduct

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Bride Wears Kirpan in Anand Karaj Rites

Bride Wears Kirpan in Anand Karaj Rites
Bride Wears Kirpan in Anand Karaj Rites. Photo © [S Khalsa]

The Sikhism code of conduct advises Sikh parents to marry their daughters to a Sikh husband and advises both husband and wife to be initiated by the Sikh baptism as Amritdhari.

Here you see the bridal couple in the third lap of one of the four wedding rounds. The bride is wearing a kirpan as she follows her groom around the Guru Granth Sahib while ragis sing the Lavan hymns. The kirpan is one of five required articles of faith to be worn by an Amritdhari bride who is has been initiated as a Khalsa warrior in the Amrit baptism ceremony.

More:
All About Amrit Sanchar the Khalsa Initiation Ceremony
Amrit Sanchar Sikh Initiation Ceremony Illustrated

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Completing Wedding Rounds

Completing Rounds
Completing Wedding Rounds. Photo © [S Khalsa]

The Sikh bride and groom perform parkarma circling round the holy scripture Guru Granth Sahib as each one of the four hymns of Lavan is sung by the ragis. The nuptial couple make a total of four wedding rounds in all. After the fourth parkarma round, the couple is wed, and complete the ceremony as man and wife.

Here you see the bridal couple completing the parkarma wedding rounds of the Anand Karaj marriage ceremony and turning to face Guru Granth Sahib.

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Bridal Couple Sit Before Guru Granth Sahib

Wedding Rounds Complete With Couple Married
Wedding Rounds Complete With Couple Married. Photo © [S Khalsa]

The Sikh bride and groom sit facing Guru Granth Sahib after completion of the four wedding rounds of the Anand Karaj marriage.

Attending a Sikh Wedding by Pavan Deep Kaur Continued:
" 4. cont. Main Wedding Ceremony: After each round the couple sits down and listens while the priest reads the next stanza. The ragis then sing same holy hymns of Lavan while the couple completes another walk around Sri Guru Granth Sahib. This process is repeated four times in total for each stanza of the Lavan after which the couple sits down. When the four Lavans are complete, the hymn of Anand Sahib (the hymns of eternal bliss) is sung by the ragis." 
5. Ardas: At the conclusion of the marriage ceremony, the entire congregation will stand and join in the ardas. This usually lasts anywhere from 5-7 minutes. This is followed by the Hukamnama (the order from the Guru Granth Sahib).
6. Kirtan/Katha: The ragi’s sing hymns. A priest then advises the couple on the significance of marriage, their duties, and obligations to each others as equal partners according to the Sikh teachings.
7. Karah Prasad (Guru's Grace): "Blessed "Sweet pudding" is distributed to every person present and is received with both hands."
"8. Guru Ka Langar (lunch): will be served downstairs in the hall adjacent to the kitchen. The cuisine is strictly vegetarian and guests will eat together alongside the couple while seated on the floor.
Q: Will there be alcohol or meat served during your wedding?
A: In accordance with the tenets of our faith, there will be no alcohol or meat served at our wedding. All menu items will consist of north Indian vegetarian cuisine. Non-alcoholic beverage service will be provided. Your cooperation and understanding is greatly appreciated. - Pavan Deep Kaur

Here you see the bride and groom, with wedding party, at the conclusion of their parkarma wedding rounds. The wedded couple listen to marital advice given by the officiating priest at the close of the Anand Karaj wedding rites. The ragis sing two final hymns to complete the ceremony:

  • "Veeahu Hoa Mere Babula" - "My Marriage Has Been Performed
  • "Pooree Asa Jee Mansaa Mere Raam" - "My Desires Are Fulfilled"

More:
Illustrated Prashad Recipe
Eight Guidelines for Langar
All About Langar and the Guru's Free Kitchen

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Bride and Groom Perform Gatka Sword Dance

Bride and Groom Gatka Sword Dance
Bride and Groom Gatka Sword Dance. Photo © [Courtesy Pavan Deep Kaur]

Har Prit Singh and Pavan Deep Kaur elected to perform the Gatka sword dance following their marriage ceremony at their gurdwara reception.

The Anand Karaj ceremony may only be performed in a gurdwara, or hall, where no dancing takes place. Wedding parties may opt for a wedding reception to be held separately sat a different location, however traditionally Sikh men and women do not dance together in public, not even a bride and groom. The Gatka sword dance is a traditional form of martial arts practiced by Sikhs and though not a usual aspect of a Sikh wedding, Gatka demonstrations are permitted on gurdwara grounds, with both male and female participants.

Attending a Sikh Wedding by Pavan Deep Kaur Continued:
"9. Gatka: This is a demonstration of the Sikh Martial Arts (Gatka). It is a style of fighting using swords and wooden sticks intended to simulate swords. The style originated in late 19th century, out of sword practice in the British Indian Army, divided in two sub-style, called rasmi (ritualistic) and khel (sport) from the 1880s. Gatka is now popular as a sport, or sword dance performance art, and is often shown during Sikh festivals. These performances represent historical martial arts reconstruction of 16th to 18th century Sikh fighting styles.
10. Departure of Doli: Once guests have left the gurdwara, the couple and the immediate families on both sides will proceed to the bride’s home for a small ceremony marking the departure of the bride from her parent's house."  - Pavan Deep Kaur

Here you see the newlyweds perform the Gatka sword dance for wedding guests outside the gurdwara. Their bridal attire is fashioned along the lines of traditional Sikh warrior garments which allow for ease of movement during rigorous activity. This Gursikh couple is starting off married life with a martial spirit!

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