Sing 'Deck the Halls' in Spanish

Song Includes Irregular Verbs, Imperative Mood

deck the halls in Spanish
Christmas in Santiago, Galicia, Spain. Photo by Amio Cajander; licensed via Creative Commons.

Here is a Spanish version of the popular Christmas song "Deck the Halls." Note that this song isn't a translation of the English but rather a Christmas-themed song that uses the same tune.

Ya llegó la Navidad

¡Ya llegó la Navidad!
  Fa-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la.
¡Qué alegre se siente el alma!
  Fa-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la.
Vamos todos a cantar.
  Fa-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la
Vamos todos a reír.
  Fa-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la.

Apóstoles y magos vienen
  Fa-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la.
Adorar al tierno niño.
  Fa-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la
Vamos todos a cantar.
  Fa-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la
Vamos todos a reír.
  Fa-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la

Por doquiera llevaremos
  Fa-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la
Mensaje de buenas nuevas
  Fa-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la
Vamos todos a cantar.
  Fa-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la
Vamos todos a reír.
  Fa-la-la-la-la-la-la-la-la

Translation

Here is a possible translation of this Spanish song omitting the fa-la-la refrain:

Christmas is already here! How happy the soul feels!
Let's all go to sing. Let's all go to laugh.

Apostles and magi come to worship the tender boy.
Let's all go to sing. Let's all go to laugh.

Let's carry the message of good news everywhere.
Let's all go to sing. Let's all go to laugh.

(Note: The Spanish lyrics are in the public domain.)

Vocabulary and Grammar Notes

Note how in Spanish only the first word and the proper noun Navidad are capitalized in the song's title.

The same pattern is used for other composition titles such as the names of novels and movies.

Ya is a common adverb that has many translations but generally is used as a way of adding emphasis.

Llegó is the singular third-person preterite form of llegar, which means to arrive. The Spanish verb is used in a figurative way, as here, more often than the English verb.

Navidad is the Spanish word for Christmas. It is frequently used, as here, with the definite article la.

In Spanish it is not unusual to place the subject after the verb, as is done in the first line.

"¡Qué + adjective!" is a common way of saying "How + adjective!"

Vamos is the first-person plural imperative of ir," the verb for "to go." "Vamos a + infinitive" is the usual way to say "let's go + verb."

Vienen is a form of the irregular verb venir.

Por doquiera is a shortened form of por dondequiera, meaning "everywhere." This shortened form is found primarily in songs and poetic writing.

Llevaremos is the first-person plural form of llevar, which usually means to carry.