Billiards Practice - Some Of The Most Fun Techniques

When Learning Is More Fun Than Not!

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Try this drill for pool practice and the ones on subsequent pages also. Photo (c) Matt Sherman, licensed to About.com, Inc.

Billiards Practice That Doesn't Stink

A day of billiards practice? (Almost) everyone hates pool practice so I'm sharing the most fun techniques in this article, readers. I make it fun with a few simple routines.

We need to find you a drill(s) that you get addicted to, one that pays off big results in your game.

How Pros Make Billiards Practice "Fun"

An aspiring pro should be spending 80% of their time on drills and 20% playing pool games. And when someone reaches a playing pro level the reverse happens with 20%/80% for drills and playing games. But (almost) everybody I know hates to run drills.

Billiards Practice That Is Genuine Fun

Try this practice drill that is a lot more like plain fun. Shoot 1 ball only, if you make it, set up and sink 2, if you make them both, 3, and so on. See how high you can go! Can you get to all 15?

Make certain you put the balls down near the foot string in and outside the rack as if you are playing Straight Pool or finishing an Eight Ball game that started with a gentle break. Another way to say this is to use half the table and four pockets (only two corner pockets and the two side pockets) as much as possible.

If you miss, go back to one ball only. Start with ball in hand for the cue ball (your choice of position) for each ball or balls set.

Here's an interesting drill to spice your pool practice. Take video of your play (you can send it to me for a free review). Have shots taken from a 90-degree angle to your stance (on both sides) and from directly in front of your cue stick and directly behind your cue stick, in other words from all four sides of your stance, in other words.

Photos and live illustrations are always helpful, especially if you capture your pre-shot routine and stance prep on video.

Even the great players move their whole body on a lot of strokes. But then again, I'm thinking of great players. If we met in person for guided pool practice, I'd hold a cue stick in your hair so you can feel the movement of your head. Get in your stance during pool practice, and have a friend do the same during your practice and final strokes.

Later we can talk about why your eyes move that much—--if they're moving as your head moves—how most players ruin their stance.

Circle Pacing Drill - It's Actually Fun

The "circle pacing drill" will get you out of your comfort zone and force you to shoot specific draw and punch strokes for pool practice. Place all 15 balls in a rough circle in the middle of the table near the side pockets. Put the cue ball in the center of the table. Shoot all 15 balls in without the cue ball leaving the circle. If the cue ball leaves the circle, it’s over.

A Tough Drill? Sink A Straight Shot

This drill is much harder than you think unless you absorb the table position, selecting several different possibilities for your next stroke before shooting and analyze them in depth. You should probably be taking at least 45 seconds between shots to think, Fast Eddie.

Scoring The Circle Drill

A top pro is looking to sink 14 or 15 balls each time with this drill. A very, very skilled amateur, 10. A beginner is working to make 3 balls or more each time, but with careful shot planning, should be making 5 or 6 at a time, and soon.

Use less than 15 balls if you are on a small sized table.