Stoichiometry Chemistry Quiz

Self-Test for Molecules, Moles, and Formulas

Take this quiz to test how well you understand stoichiometry or mass relations in chemical equations and formulas.
Take this quiz to test how well you understand stoichiometry or mass relations in chemical equations and formulas. SEBASTIAN KAULITZKI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY / Getty Images

1. Which of the following has the largest mass of carbon per gram?

4. One atom of an element has a mass of 9.123 x 10⁻²³ g. There is only one isotope of the element. The element is:

5. If these fertilizers are priced according to their nitrogen content, which will be the least expensive per 50 lb. bag?

9. A compound has an empirical formula is NPCl₂ and a molecular weight of 347.66. What is its molecular formula?

10. Under which conditions will Mg be the limiting reagent of the reaction Mg (s) + I₂ (s) → MgI₂ (s)?

Stoichiometry Chemistry Quiz

You got: % Correct. You're Starting to Understand Stoichiometry

I got You're Starting to Understand Stoichiometry. Stoichiometry Chemistry Quiz
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Good job! You had trouble with the questions, but you made it through the quiz so you've shown you're serious about learning stoichiometry. Stoichiometry is just a 5-syllable word that means mass relations. It sounds intimidating, but it's really not that complicated. It's the study of how much matter reacts with other matter to form compounds and participate in chemical reactions.

To understand stoichiometry, start with this introduction to the topic. It might also help to review molecules and moles, which includes how chemical formulas work.

Ready for another quiz? Here's a quick self-test about the mole. If you'd rather switch gears, see if you know the answers about how chemistry explains the real world.

Stoichiometry Chemistry Quiz

You got: % Correct. You're Mastering Mass Relations

I got You're Mastering Mass Relations. Stoichiometry Chemistry Quiz
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Great work! You've shown you have a good command of mass relations and how the rules used to form chemical compounds and rearrange them in chemical reactions. If you feel a bit shaky about any part of stoichiometry, you can review the basic principles, including the different types of chemical formulas. Moving forward, you'll need to learn how to find theoretical yield and identify the limiting reactant.

Are you ready for another quiz? Put your stoichiometry know-how to use to see whether you can balance these chemical equations. If you'd rather just have some fun, see which chemical element best fits your personality.