Syracuse University Photo Tour

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Syracuse University – Hall of Languages Steps

Hall of Languages at Syracuse University
Hall of Languages Steps at Syracuse University (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Eliza Kinnealy

Syracuse University, also known as 'Cuse or SU, is a private coeducational research university in Syracuse, New York. Founded in 1870, Syracuse currently has about 21,000 students enrolled, with roughly 14,000 undergraduates. Its school color is orange and its mascot is named Otto the Orange.

The university is separated into thirteen academic schools/colleges: School of Architecture, College of Arts and Sciences, School of Education, David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, School of Information Studies (iSchool), College of Law, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, S.I, Newhouse School of Public Communications, L.C. Smith College of Engineering and Computer Science, University College, College of Visual and Performing Arts, Martin J. Whitman School of Management, and the Graduate School.

Syracuse is a member of the Big East Conference for all NCAA Division I athletics and will join the Atlantic Coast Conference on July 1, 2013.

Some famous Syracuse alumni include Dick Clark, Joe Biden, Jim Brown, Vanessa Williams, Ernie Davis, and Betsey Johnson.

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Snowy Campus - Syracuse University

Quad Snow at Syracuse University
Quad Snow at Syracuse University (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Lily Ramirez

With its location in central New York, Syracuse experiences about 100 inches of snowfall each year. Many students refer to Syracuse as having "bipolar" weather as one day it may be sunny with the next day being snowy. The cold winters at Syracuse give students the opportunity to participate in skiing, snowboarding, and sledding.

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The Hall of Languages at Syracuse University

Hall of Languages at Syracuse University
Hall of Languages at Syracuse University (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Jennifer Cooper

The Hall of Languages was the first building constructed on the Syracuse University campus in 1871. This iconic building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Designed by Horatio Nelson White, the Hall of Languages is made of Onondaga limestone and originally housed the entire university. The building was renovated in 1979.

The Hall of Languages was home to the College of Liberal Arts although other departments including the Registrar and Chancellor have occupied the building.

Many Syracuse students refer to the Hall of Languages as the "Addams Family" building because of its resemblance to the satirical fictional family's home.

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Crouse College of Fine Arts at Syracuse University

Crouse College of Fine Arts at Syracuse University
Crouse College of Fine Arts at Syracuse University (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Eliza Kinnealy

Often referred to as "Hogwarts" by students, the Crouse College of Fine Arts, or simply Crouse College, was one of the first buildings built on the Syracuse University campus. Constructed in 1888 by Archimedes Russell, Crouse College was named after the famous banker and businessman, John Crouse.

The brownstone, medieval style building includes a bell tower where a student group rings the chimes along to various tunes throughout the day. It is home to the College of Visual and Performing Arts and was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1974.

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Smith Hall at Syracuse University

Smith Hall at Syracuse University
Smith Hall at Syracuse University (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Jennifer Cooper

Built in 1900, Smith Hall was constructed by Gaggin and named after Lyman C. Smith, a typewriter pioneer. This Ohio sandstone building, located on University Place, is the home for the L.C. Smith College of Applied Science which offers degrees in civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering.

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Bowne Hall at Syracuse University

Bowne Hall at Syracuse University
Bowne Hall at Syracuse University (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Jennifer Cooper

Bowne Hall of Chemistry was built in 1909 by Professor Frederick W. Revels and named after Samuel W. Bowne, a contributor to the building's construction. This building was originally designed for the Department of Chemistry. Bowne Hall was renovated in 1989 and in 2010 and became the home of the Syracuse Biomaterials Institute.

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Carnegie Library at Syracuse University

Carnegie Library at Syracuse University
Carnegie Library at Syracuse University (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Lily Ramirez

Located on the south side of the Quad, Carnegie Library was built in 1907 by Professors Frederick W. Revels and Earl Hallenbeck. With the opening of Bird Library in 1972, Carnegie was renovated to house collections in life and physical sciences, engineering, health, library studies, photography, mathematics, textiles and crafts, and computer science.

Carnegie offers study space, wireless access, and desktop computers with printing and scanning for students and staff.

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Lyman Hall of Natural History at Syracuse University

Lyman Hall at Syracuse University
Lyman Hall at Syracuse University (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Jennifer Cooper

Constructed in 1905, Lyman Hall of Natural History was originally home to the Departments of Biology, Botany, Geology, Zoology, Psychology and Geography. The Renaissance-style building was named after trustee John Lyman's deceased daughters, Mary and Jessie.

The marble and Indian limestone building caught fire in 1937, destroying the top floor, roof, and valuable museum collections. Fortunately, Lyman Hall was restored later that year.

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Hendricks Chapel at Syracuse University

Hendricks Chapel at Syracuse University
Hendricks Chapel at Syracuse University (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Jennifer Cooper

Hendricks Chapel is situated in the middle of the Syracuse campus, perpendicular to the Quad. Built in 1930, Hendricks was the third largest University chapel in the country at the time of its construction and seats 1,450 people. The chapel's architects were James Russell Pope and Dwight James Baum from the Class of 1909. Francis Hendricks, a state senator and SU trustee, donated the chapel honoring his late wife. The Georgia limestone and brick chapel serves all faiths. The chapel's pulpit was a gift from the Class of 1918 while the Aeolian organ was a gift of Francis Hendricks' niece, Kathryn but was replaced in 1952.

Hendricks Chapel hosts a variety of events, speakers, and religious activities throughout the year.

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Maxwell Hall at Syracuse University

Maxwell Hall at Syracuse University
Maxwell Hall at Syracuse University (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Jennifer Cooper

Maxwell Hall of Citizenship and Public Affairs was constructed in 1937 by James Dwight Baum and John Russell Pope. George Holmes Maxwell, an SU alumnus and member of the Board of Trustees, was a successful Boston patent attorney, financier, inventor, and shoe manufacturer who funded the Georgian Colonial brick building.

Eggers Hall, built in 1993, links to Maxwell Hall with a public atrium.

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Bird Library at Syracuse University

Bird Library at Syracuse University
Bird Library at Syracuse University (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Jennifer Cooper

Bird Library, named after trustee Ernest S. Bird, was built in 1972 by King and King Associates. Before Bird was built, Carnegie Library was the primary study space for students. With seven floors, several computer labs, and a café, Bird Library is now the place to go if a student wants some quiet time to study. Students can also rent or check out laptops and other equipment here.

Located on the first floor, Pages Café features Freedom of Expresso. The café also offers a variety of sandwiches, gourmet wraps, breakfast items, and pastries.

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Link Hall at Syracuse University

Link Hall at Syracuse University
Link Hall at Syracuse University (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Jennifer Cooper

Built in 1970, the Link Hall Engineering Building was named after Edward Albert Link, founder of Link Aviation and inventor of Link Flight Trainer used to train military and commercial pilots. Located in the Quad next to Slocum Hall, Link Hall has six levels and is the home to the engineering college.

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Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University

Newhouse Buildings at Syracuse University
Newhouse Buildings at Syracuse University (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Jennifer Cooper

The Newhouse buildings are devoted to broadcast film, television and radio. With its two studios, 100 seat theater, and a broadcast news laboratory, Newhouse helps students gain real-life experience by simulating broadcasts, radio and television programs.

The S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications is a highly selective program, being ranked as one of the top journalism schools in the country.

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Ernie Davis Hall at Syracuse University

Ernie Davis Hall at Syracuse University
Ernie Davis Hall at Syracuse University (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Jennifer Cooper

Ernie Davis Hall is Syracuse's first "green" residence hall. Features include low water-use fixtures, a storm-water management system, advanced materials requiring less energy to cool, and dining hall efficiencies to reduce food waste and hot-water consumption.

Ernie Davis houses around 250 students and ten resident advisors. The residence hall also provides students with a dining hall, a gym, as well as lounges and laundry facilities on each floor. The building was named after the 1962 college football star and first African American player to be awarded the Heisman Trophy.

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The Carrier Dome at Syracuse University

The Carrier Dome at Syracuse University
The Carrier Dome at Syracuse University (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Jennifer Cooper

Opened in 1980, the 49,262 seat Carrier Dome, also known as the "Loud House," hosts a variety of events including SU football, basketball, lacrosse, track and field, soccer, field hockey; professional and high school athletic events; University commencement, concerts, and various other academic and community events. At the time of its installation, the Carrier Dome was ranked as the 5th largest domed stadium in the U.S. and the first in the northeast.

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