7 Thanksgiving Bible Verses to Show Your Gratitude

Well-Chosen Scriptures for Celebrating Thanksgiving Day

Thanksgiving Bible Verses
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These Thanksgiving Bible verses contain well-chosen words from Scripture to assist you in giving thanks and praise on the holiday. As a matter of fact, these passages will make your heart glad any day of the year.

Psalm 31, a psalm of King David, is a cry for deliverance from trouble, but the passage is also laced with expressions of thanksgiving and declarations about the goodness of God. In verses 19-20, David transitions from praying to God to praising and thanking him for his goodness, mercy, and protection:

How abundant are the good things that you have stored up for those who fear you, that you bestow in the sight of all, on those who take refuge in you. In the shelter of your presence you hide them from all human intrigues; you keep them safe in your dwelling from accusing tongues. (Psalm 31:19-20, NIV)

Psalm 95 has been used throughout the ages of church history as a song of worship. It is still used today in the synagogue as one of the Friday evening psalms to introduce the sabbath. It is divided into two parts. The first part (verses 1-7c) is a call to worship and give thanks to the Lord. This part of the psalm is sung by believers on their way to the sanctuary, or by the whole congregation. The first duty of worshipers is to thank God when they come into his presence. The loudness of the "joyful noise" indicates sincerity and earnestness of heart.

The second half of the psalm (verses 7d–11) is a message from the Lord, warning against rebellion and disobedience.

Typically, this segment is delivered by a priest or a prophet.

O come, let us sing unto the LORD: let us make a joyful noise to the rock of our salvation. Let us come before his presence with thanksgiving, and make a joyful noise unto him with psalms. For the LORD is a great God, and a great King above all gods. In his hand are the deep places of the earth: the strength of the hills is his also. The sea is his, and he made it: and his hands formed the dry land. O come, let us worship and bow down: let us kneel before the LORD our maker. For he is our God; And we are the people of his pasture, and the sheep of his hand. Psalm 95:1-7, KJV)

Psalm 100 is a hymn of praise and thanksgiving to God used in Jewish worship at Temple services. All the people of the world are called upon to worship and praise the Lord. The entire psalm is upbeat and joyful, with praises to God expressed from beginning to end. It is a fitting psalm for celebrating Thanksgiving Day:

Make a joyful noise unto the LORD, all ye lands. Serve the LORD with gladness: come before his presence with singing. Know ye that the LORD he is God: it is he that hath made us, and not we ourselves; we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture. Enter into his gates with thanksgiving, and into his courts with praise: be thankful unto him, and bless his name. For the LORD is good; his mercy is everlasting; and his truth endureth to all generations. (Psalm 100, KJV)

God's people have much to be thankful for, and perhaps most of all for our Savior's redeeming love. Psalm 107 presents a hymn of thanksgiving and a song of praise filled with expressions of gratitude for God's divine intervention and deliverance:

Give thanks to the LORD, for he is good; his love endures forever. Let them give thanks to the Lord for his unfailing love and his wonderful deeds for mankind, for he satisfies the thirsty and fills the hungry with good things. (Psalm 107:1,8-9, NIV)

Psalm 145 is a psalm of praise from David glorifying God’s greatness. In the Hebrew text, this psalm is an acrostic poem with 21 lines, each starting with the next letter of the alphabet. The pervading themes are God's mercy and provision. David focuses on how God has shown his righteousness through his actions on behalf of his people. He was determined to praise the Lord and he encouraged all others to praise him too. Along with all of his worthy qualities and glorious deeds, God himself is plainly too much for people to comprehend. The entire passage is filled with uninterrupted thanksgiving and praise:

I will exalt you, my God the King; I will praise your name for ever and ever. Every day I will praise you and extol your name for ever and ever. Great is the Lord and most worthy of praise; his greatness no one can fathom. One generation commends your works to another; they tell of your mighty acts. They speak of the glorious splendor of your majesty—and I will meditate on your wonderful works. They tell of the power of your awesome works—and I will proclaim your great deeds. They will celebrate your abundant goodness and joyfully sing of your righteousness. (Psalm 145:1-7, NIV)

These verses in 1 Chronicles are an invitation to all the people of the world to praise to the Lord. Indeed, the writer invites the entire universe to join in the celebration of God's greatness and unfailing love. The Lord is great, and his greatness ought to be recognized and proclaimed:

O nations of the world, recognize the Lord, recognize that the Lord is glorious and strong. Give to the Lord the glory he deserves! Bring your offering and come into his presence. Worship the Lord in all his holy splendor. Let all the earth tremble before him. The world stands firm and cannot be shaken. Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good! His faithful love endures forever. (1 Chronicles 16:28-30,34, NLT)

The first part of this passage has become a part of Christian liturgy referred to as the doxology in the Lord’s Prayer: "Yours, O LORD, is the greatness and the power and the glory." This is a prayer of David expressing the priority of his heart to worship the Lord:

Yours, O LORD, is the greatness and the power and the glory and the majesty and the splendor, for everything in heaven and earth is yours. Yours, O LORD, is the kingdom; you are exalted as head over all. (1 Chronicles 29:11-13, NIV)