The Art of Italy in the Royal Collection - The Baroque

01
of 12

An Allegory of Truth and Time, ca. 1584-85

The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II; used with permission
Annibale Carracci (Italian, 1560-1609) Annibale Carracci (Italian, 1560-1609). An Allegory of Truth and Time, ca. 1584-85. Oil on canvas. 130 x 169.6 cm (51 3/16 x 66 3/4 in.). Possibly first recorded in the Royal Collection during the reign of Queen Anne. RCIN 404770. The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

On View November 13, 2008-March 8, 2009, Palace of Holyroodhouse


The Art of Italy in the Royal Collection comes to The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse in two parts in 2008 and 2009. Part two, seen here, centers on the Baroque. The 74 paintings and drawings selected for the exhibition amply illustrate the great stylistic diversity of this long artistic era. Highlights include works by Caravaggio, Bernini, Domenico Fetti, and the painters Gentileschi.

The Stuart king Charles I (1600-1649) was first responsible for bringing 16th- and 17th-century Italian art to the Royal Collection. Most of his acquisitions were sold on Cromwell's order during the Interregnum. After the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, Charles II (1630-1685) was particularly keen to track down and regain his father's Italian pieces. From then on, other royal patrons (notably Frederick, Prince of Wales; George III; George IV; Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; and Queen Mary, consort of George V) have augmented this key component of the Royal Collection.


About the Show:

The Art of Italy in the Royal Collection comes to Edinburgh in two parts in 2008 and 2009. Part two, seen here, centers on the Baroque. The 74 paintings and drawings selected for the exhibition amply illustrate the great stylistic diversity of this long artistic era. Highlights include works by Caravaggio, Bernini, Domenico Fetti, and the painters Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi.

The Stuart king Charles I (1600-1649) was first responsible for bringing 16th- and 17th-century Italian art to the Royal Collection. Most of his acquisitions were sold on Cromwell's order during the Interregnum. After the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, Charles II (1630-1685) was particularly keen to track down and regain his father's Italian pieces. From then on, other royal patrons (notably Frederick, Prince of Wales; George III; George IV; Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; and Queen Mary, consort of George V) have augmented this key component of the Royal Collection.

Scheduled Venue:

The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: November 13, 2008-March 8, 2009

02
of 12

Head of a Man in Profile, 1588-95

The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II; used with permission
Annibale Carracci (Italian, 1560-1609) Annibale Carracci (Italian, 1560-1609). Head of a Man in Profile, 1588-95. Oil on canvas. 44.8 x 32.1 cm (17 5/8 x 12 1/4 in.). Probably acquired by Frederick, Prince of Wales. RCIN 405471. The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II


About the Show:

The Art of Italy in the Royal Collection comes to Edinburgh in two parts in 2008 and 2009. Part two, seen here, centers on the Baroque. The 74 paintings and drawings selected for the exhibition amply illustrate the great stylistic diversity of this long artistic era. Highlights include works by Caravaggio, Bernini, Domenico Fetti, and the painters Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi.

The Stuart king Charles I (1600-1649) was first responsible for bringing 16th- and 17th-century Italian art to the Royal Collection. Most of his acquisitions were sold on Cromwell's order during the Interregnum. After the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, Charles II (1630-1685) was particularly keen to track down and regain his father's Italian pieces. From then on, other royal patrons (notably Frederick, Prince of Wales; George III; George IV; Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; and Queen Mary, consort of George V) have augmented this key component of the Royal Collection.

Scheduled Venue:

The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: November 13, 2008-March 8, 2009

03
of 12

Boy Peeling Fruit, ca. 1592-93

The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II; used with permission
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610). Boy Peeling Fruit, ca. 1592-93. Oil on canvas. 61 x 48.3 cm (24 x 19 in.). Possibly acquired by Charles II. RCIN 402612. The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II


About the Show:

The Art of Italy in the Royal Collection comes to Edinburgh in two parts in 2008 and 2009. Part two, seen here, centers on the Baroque. The 74 paintings and drawings selected for the exhibition amply illustrate the great stylistic diversity of this long artistic era. Highlights include works by Caravaggio, Bernini, Domenico Fetti, and the painters Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi.

The Stuart king Charles I (1600-1649) was first responsible for bringing 16th- and 17th-century Italian art to the Royal Collection. Most of his acquisitions were sold on Cromwell's order during the Interregnum. After the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, Charles II (1630-1685) was particularly keen to track down and regain his father's Italian pieces. From then on, other royal patrons (notably Frederick, Prince of Wales; George III; George IV; Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; and Queen Mary, consort of George V) have augmented this key component of the Royal Collection.

Scheduled Venue:

The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: November 13, 2008-March 8, 2009

04
of 12

The Calling of Saints Peter and Andrew, ca. 1602-04

The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II; used with permission
Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610) Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (Italian, 1571-1610). The Calling of Saints Peter and Andrew, ca. 1602-04. Oil on canvas. 140 x 176 cm (55 1/8 x 69 1/4 in.). Acquired by Charles I. RCIN 402824. The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II


About the Show:

The Art of Italy in the Royal Collection comes to Edinburgh in two parts in 2008 and 2009. Part two, seen here, centers on the Baroque. The 74 paintings and drawings selected for the exhibition amply illustrate the great stylistic diversity of this long artistic era. Highlights include works by Caravaggio, Bernini, Domenico Fetti, and the painters Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi.

The Stuart king Charles I (1600-1649) was first responsible for bringing 16th- and 17th-century Italian art to the Royal Collection. Most of his acquisitions were sold on Cromwell's order during the Interregnum. After the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, Charles II (1630-1685) was particularly keen to track down and regain his father's Italian pieces. From then on, other royal patrons (notably Frederick, Prince of Wales; George III; George IV; Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; and Queen Mary, consort of George V) have augmented this key component of the Royal Collection.

Scheduled Venue:

The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: November 13, 2008-March 8, 2009

05
of 12

Judith with the Head of Holofernes, 1613

The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II; used with permission
Cristofano Allori (Italian, 1577-1621) Cristofano Allori (Italian, 1577-1621). Judith with the Head of Holofernes, 1613. Oil on canvas. 120.4 x 100.3 cm (47 3/8 x 39 1/2 in.). Acquired by Charles I. RCIN 404989. The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II


What you may not know about this particular painting is that it's not merely a gorgeous Baroque rendition of a scene from the apocryphal Book of Judith, wherein the plucky widow seduced the invading Babylonian general, Holofernes, over the course of three evenings only to relieve him of his drunken head at the end.

No, the bodiless head we see here is actually Cristofano Allori's self portrait. "Judith" is Allori's very-much-ex-mistress, Maria de Giovanni Mazzafirri (presumably painted from memory, as she had recently, painfully and permanently deserted the artist). And Judith's "maidservant" is supposed to be Mazzafirri's mother, the woman who would not become Allori's mother-in-law. Given the story-context in which he placed the three of them, we are left to assume that he took the end of this love affair badly, but was perhaps already realizing that he'd narrowly dodged a worse fate.

About the Show:

The Art of Italy in the Royal Collection comes to Edinburgh in two parts in 2008 and 2009. Part two, seen here, centers on the Baroque. The 74 paintings and drawings selected for the exhibition amply illustrate the great stylistic diversity of this long artistic era. Highlights include works by Caravaggio, Bernini, Domenico Fetti, and the painters Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi.

The Stuart king Charles I (1600-1649) was first responsible for bringing 16th- and 17th-century Italian art to the Royal Collection. Most of his acquisitions were sold on Cromwell's order during the Interregnum. After the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, Charles II (1630-1685) was particularly keen to track down and regain his father's Italian pieces. From then on, other royal patrons (notably Frederick, Prince of Wales; George III; George IV; Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; and Queen Mary, consort of George V) have augmented this key component of the Royal Collection.

Scheduled Venue:

The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: November 13, 2008-March 8, 2009

06
of 12

A Recumbent Male Nude, ca. 1618-19

The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II; used with permission
Guercino (Italian, 1591-1666) Guercino (Italian, 1591-1666). A Recumbent Male Nude, ca. 1618-19. Oiled charcoal with some white chalk on buff paper, the corners made up. 38.5 x 58 cm (15 1/8 x 22 13/16 in.). Purchased by George III. RL O1227. The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II


About the Show:

The Art of Italy in the Royal Collection comes to Edinburgh in two parts in 2008 and 2009. Part two, seen here, centers on the Baroque. The 74 paintings and drawings selected for the exhibition amply illustrate the great stylistic diversity of this long artistic era. Highlights include works by Caravaggio, Bernini, Domenico Fetti, and the painters Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi.

The Stuart king Charles I (1600-1649) was first responsible for bringing 16th- and 17th-century Italian art to the Royal Collection. Most of his acquisitions were sold on Cromwell's order during the Interregnum. After the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, Charles II (1630-1685) was particularly keen to track down and regain his father's Italian pieces. From then on, other royal patrons (notably Frederick, Prince of Wales; George III; George IV; Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; and Queen Mary, consort of George V) have augmented this key component of the Royal Collection.

Scheduled Venue:

The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: November 13, 2008-March 8, 2009

07
of 12

The Head of Christ, 1620

The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II; used with permission
Guido Reni (Italian, 1575-1642) Guido Reni (Italian, 1575-1642). The Head of Christ, 1620. Red chalk. 34.4 x 26.7 cm (13 1/2 x 10 1/2 in.). Purchased by George III. RL 5283. The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II


About the Show:

The Art of Italy in the Royal Collection comes to Edinburgh in two parts in 2008 and 2009. Part two, seen here, centers on the Baroque. The 74 paintings and drawings selected for the exhibition amply illustrate the great stylistic diversity of this long artistic era. Highlights include works by Caravaggio, Bernini, Domenico Fetti, and the painters Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi.

The Stuart king Charles I (1600-1649) was first responsible for bringing 16th- and 17th-century Italian art to the Royal Collection. Most of his acquisitions were sold on Cromwell's order during the Interregnum. After the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, Charles II (1630-1685) was particularly keen to track down and regain his father's Italian pieces. From then on, other royal patrons (notably Frederick, Prince of Wales; George III; George IV; Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; and Queen Mary, consort of George V) have augmented this key component of the Royal Collection.

Scheduled Venue:

The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: November 13, 2008-March 8, 2009

08
of 12

David with the Head of Goliath, ca. 1620

The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II; used with permission
Domenico Fetti (Italian, ca. 1589-1623) Domenico Fetti (Italian, ca. 1589-1623). David with the Head of Goliath, ca. 1620. Oil on canvas. 153 x 125.1 cm (60 1/4 x 49 1/4 in.). Acquired by Charles I. RCIN 404731. The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II


About the Show:

The Art of Italy in the Royal Collection comes to Edinburgh in two parts in 2008 and 2009. Part two, seen here, centers on the Baroque. The 74 paintings and drawings selected for the exhibition amply illustrate the great stylistic diversity of this long artistic era. Highlights include works by Caravaggio, Bernini, Domenico Fetti, and the painters Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi.

The Stuart king Charles I (1600-1649) was first responsible for bringing 16th- and 17th-century Italian art to the Royal Collection. Most of his acquisitions were sold on Cromwell's order during the Interregnum. After the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, Charles II (1630-1685) was particularly keen to track down and regain his father's Italian pieces. From then on, other royal patrons (notably Frederick, Prince of Wales; George III; George IV; Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; and Queen Mary, consort of George V) have augmented this key component of the Royal Collection.

Scheduled Venue:

The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: November 13, 2008-March 8, 2009

09
of 12

A Male Nude from Behind, ca. 1630

The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II; used with permission
Gian Lorenzo Bernini (1598-1680) Gian Lorenzo Bernini (1598-1680). A Male Nude from Behind, ca. 1630. Red and white chalks on buff paper. 55.6 x 42 cm (21 7/8 x 16 1/2 in.). Royal Collection by ca. 1810. RL 5537. The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II


About the Show:

The Art of Italy in the Royal Collection comes to Edinburgh in two parts in 2008 and 2009. Part two, seen here, centers on the Baroque. The 74 paintings and drawings selected for the exhibition amply illustrate the great stylistic diversity of this long artistic era. Highlights include works by Caravaggio, Bernini, Domenico Fetti, and the painters Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi.

The Stuart king Charles I (1600-1649) was first responsible for bringing 16th- and 17th-century Italian art to the Royal Collection. Most of his acquisitions were sold on Cromwell's order during the Interregnum. After the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, Charles II (1630-1685) was particularly keen to track down and regain his father's Italian pieces. From then on, other royal patrons (notably Frederick, Prince of Wales; George III; George IV; Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; and Queen Mary, consort of George V) have augmented this key component of the Royal Collection.

Scheduled Venue:

The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: November 13, 2008-March 8, 2009

10
of 12

Joseph and Potiphar's Wife, ca. 1630-32

The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II; used with permission
Orazio Gentileschi (Italian, 1563-1638) Orazio Gentileschi (Italian, 1563-1638). Joseph and Potiphar's Wife, ca. 1630-32. Oil on canvas. 206 x 261.9 cm (81 1/16 x 103 1/16 in.). Painted for Charles I. RCIN 405477. The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II


About the Show:

The Art of Italy in the Royal Collection comes to Edinburgh in two parts in 2008 and 2009. Part two, seen here, centers on the Baroque. The 74 paintings and drawings selected for the exhibition amply illustrate the great stylistic diversity of this long artistic era. Highlights include works by Caravaggio, Bernini, Domenico Fetti, and the painters Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi.

The Stuart king Charles I (1600-1649) was first responsible for bringing 16th- and 17th-century Italian art to the Royal Collection. Most of his acquisitions were sold on Cromwell's order during the Interregnum. After the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, Charles II (1630-1685) was particularly keen to track down and regain his father's Italian pieces. From then on, other royal patrons (notably Frederick, Prince of Wales; George III; George IV; Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; and Queen Mary, consort of George V) have augmented this key component of the Royal Collection.

Scheduled Venue:

The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: November 13, 2008-March 8, 2009

11
of 12

Self-portrait as the Allegory of Painting (La Pittura), 1638-39

The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II; used with permission
Artemisia Gentileschi (Italian, 1593-1652) Artemisia Gentileschi (Italian, 1593-1652). Self-portrait as the Allegory of Painting (La Pittura), 1638-39. Oil on canvas. 96.5 x 73.7 cm (38 x 29 in.). First recorded in the Royal Collection during the reign of Charles I. RCIN 405551. The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II


About the Show:

The Art of Italy in the Royal Collection comes to Edinburgh in two parts in 2008 and 2009. Part two, seen here, centers on the Baroque. The 74 paintings and drawings selected for the exhibition amply illustrate the great stylistic diversity of this long artistic era. Highlights include works by Caravaggio, Bernini, Domenico Fetti, and the painters Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi.

The Stuart king Charles I (1600-1649) was first responsible for bringing 16th- and 17th-century Italian art to the Royal Collection. Most of his acquisitions were sold on Cromwell's order during the Interregnum. After the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, Charles II (1630-1685) was particularly keen to track down and regain his father's Italian pieces. From then on, other royal patrons (notably Frederick, Prince of Wales; George III; George IV; Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; and Queen Mary, consort of George V) have augmented this key component of the Royal Collection.

Scheduled Venue:

The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: November 13, 2008-March 8, 2009

12
of 12

Salome with the Head of St John the Baptist, ca. 1665-70

The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II; used with permission
Carlo Dolci (Italian, 1616-86) Carlo Dolci (Italian, 1616-86). Salome with the Head of St John the Baptist, ca. 1665-70. Oil on canvas. 126 x 102 cm (49 9/16 x 40 1/8 in.). Presented to Charles II. RCIN 405639. The Royal Collection © 2008, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II


About the Show:

The Art of Italy in the Royal Collection comes to Edinburgh in two parts in 2008 and 2009. Part two, seen here, centers on the Baroque. The 74 paintings and drawings selected for the exhibition amply illustrate the great stylistic diversity of this long artistic era. Highlights include works by Caravaggio, Bernini, Domenico Fetti, and the painters Orazio and Artemisia Gentileschi.

The Stuart king Charles I (1600-1649) was first responsible for bringing 16th- and 17th-century Italian art to the Royal Collection. Most of his acquisitions were sold on Cromwell's order during the Interregnum. After the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660, Charles II (1630-1685) was particularly keen to track down and regain his father's Italian pieces. From then on, other royal patrons (notably Frederick, Prince of Wales; George III; George IV; Queen Victoria and Prince Albert; and Queen Mary, consort of George V) have augmented this key component of the Royal Collection.

Scheduled Venue:

The Queen's Gallery, Palace of Holyroodhouse: November 13, 2008-March 8, 2009