The 6 Worst Study Tips in History

People are trying, for goodness' sake. They really are. When they give you study tips, they are legitimately trying to help you. But for the love of all things holy, if you've heard any of the following worst study tips in history, then don't take the advice. Please. Do yourself this one small favor. Your GPA and general intelligence will thank you.

01
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Don't Get Out of Your Seat Until You've Learned Everything.

Study Tips: Feel free to take breaks
Getty Images | DAJ

 Now this is just one of the worst study tips ever. And I've head well-meaning people use it over and over again. "Stick with it! If you sit down and stay focused until you know it all, you'll get a better score." So people will try to do it. They'll stay in their seats, sweating, hungry, thirsty and exhausted until their brains are no longer even processing information anymore. Better advice: Take breaks. Study for forty-five minutes and take a quick ten-minute break to regroup/find sustenance/use the john, etc. Breaks are your friends. Breaks will help you actually stay focused.

02
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It Doesn't Matter If You Cram.

Study Tips: Cramming doesn't help like you think it will
Getty Images | Erik Dreyer

 Well sure, it does, if you're actually interested in learning the material. If, however, you simply want to put the content into your short-term memory banks for the test, then it actually may not matter if you cram. But if you're in it for the long-haul, and want to remember because you're interested in retaining the knowledge, then cramming is the worst possible way to study. You need time and repetition to truly commit anything to your long-term memory unless your mind is a steel trap. 

03
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Study With Your Best Friend.

Study Tips: Don't study with your best friend
Getty Images | i love photos

No. Let's repeat this. No. Studying with your best friend is just asking for trouble, especially if your friend is the goof-off type. You'll end up playing basketball. Or gossiping. Or jumping off the roof into the swimming pool at three A.M. (Don't ask.) But seriously, it's not a great idea, even if your best friend is a great student. If you really want to study with a pal, go with someone who will help you stay on track and you aren't going to be tempted to goof around with like...your mom. Not interested in studying with her? Here's how to choose a good study partner. 

04
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You Don't Need To Learn Any Testing Strategies. Just Take the Test.

Study tips: use strategies for your test
Getty Images | Moritz Haisch / EyeEm

Now that's just a lie. Many people improve their tests scores by learning test-taking strategies and implementing them on test day. It makes sense! If you understand that your chances of getting an answer correct improves drastically if you can eliminate a couple of answers on a multiple-choice question, your score will be higher. And that is a strategy. There are dozens more for every possible test. Learn them. Do yourself a favor. 

05
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Study From Your Notes For a Final or Midterm.

Study Tips: Take good notes
Getty Images | Thomas Jackson

Sure, studying from your notes for a midterm or final is a good idea, but only if you combine those notes with quizzes, the book, and handouts in class. Let's be honest. You may not be a perfect note-taker. You've probably missed a few things. If your teacher or professor doesn't give you a test study guide, (or even if he or she does and you're left to fill in the blanks), you'll need a combination of everything you've received in class to ensure you have all the content you need to score your best. 

06
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Pull An All-Nighter If You Want To Ace Your Test.

Tired.jpg
Getty Images | Tara Moore

That's probably the worst thing you can do if you want that elusive 100%. The smartest thing is to start early and study often (time and repetition being key to real learning), but your brain is going to malfunction if you show up to the test with a sleep deficit the size of Utah. Study late, but get to bed. Get at least seven hours of sleep if you want your brain to function normally. Otherwise, you'll be in survival mode, having a difficult time keeping track of anything let alone what you were discussing in Part two of your essay test.