Thom Mayne Architecture Portfolio of Selected Works

01
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Kate Mantilini Restaurant, 1986

Kate Mantilini Restaurant by Thom Mayne
Kate Mantilini Restaurant by Thom Mayne. Photo by Mark Davis/Getty Images Entertainment Collection/Getty Images

Architect Thom Mayne has won many awards, including the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize in 2005. The Pritzker Jury citation notes that the name of Mayne's architecture business, Morphosis, "means 'to be in formation,' and is a particularly apt description of this architect’s professional career journey and struggle." He is known for designing buildings that move beyond modernism and postmodernism. "He has sought throughout his career to create an original architecture," the Jury Citation goes on to say, "one that is truly representative of the unique, somewhat rootless, culture of Southern California, especially the architecturally rich city of Los Angeles."

Mayne's first commissions included exclusive Southern California eateries. Shown here is  Kate Mantilini, a 220-Seat restaurant on Wilshire Boulevard in Beverly Hills. The less than intimate interior spaces served the community of onlookers, where it has always been better to be seen than to disappear in the crowd.

Learn More:

Sources: Jury Citation at pritzkerprize.com [accessed January 12, 2016]

02
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Perot Museum of Nature and Science, 2012

Escalator at the Perot Museum of Nature & Science designed by Thom Mayne, 2013, Dallas, Texas
Escalator at the Perot Museum of Nature & Science designed by Thom Mayne, 2013, Dallas, Texas. Photo by George Rose/Getty Images News Collection/Getty Images

The architecture is described as having "unexpected details," including a "54-foot, continuous-flow escalator contained in a 150-foot, glass-enclosed, tube-like structure." To the people who know Mayne's work, the unexpected is expected.

About the Perot Museum:

Architect: Thom Mayne and Morphhosis
Location: 2201 N. Field Street, Dallas, TX 75201-1704
Year Completed: 2102
Exterior Siding: "656 textured precast concrete panels, totaling 4 million pounds"

In 2008, the children of Margot and Ross Perot gave $50 million to develop a learning museum that would "inspire a new generation of engineers and scientists." The 5-story Perot Museum of Nature and Science was already on Thom Mayne's drawing board.

Learn More:

Sources: The Perot Family and The Architect and The Building at perotmuseum.org [accessed January 12, 2016]

03
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The Crawford Residence, 1990

Crawford Residence in Montecito, CA by Thom Mayne, 1990
Crawford Residence in Montecito, CA by Thom Mayne, 1990. Photo by Kim Zwarts courtesy The Hyatt Foundation at pritzkerprize.com (cropped; resized)

Built for Bill and Joan Crawford in Montecito, California, this 8,000 square foot home has no clear front and no single focal point. The Prizker Prize winning architect Thom Mayne intentionally blurred the boundaries between interior and exterior spaces.

04
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The Blades Residence, 1995

Blades Residence in Santa Barbara, CA by Thom Mayne, 1995
Blades Residence in Santa Barbara, CA by Thom Mayne, 1995. Photo by Kim Zwarts courtesy The Hyatt Foundation at pritzkerprize.com

Like the Crawford home, the Blade Residence confuses boundaries between indoors and out. Pritzker Prize winning architect Thom Mayne wanted to transcend the concept of a traditional suburban home. The garden is an elliptical outdoor room that dominates the 4,800 square foot home. The house was built for Richard and Vicki Blades in Santa Barbara, California.

05
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Emerson College Los Angeles, 2014

Emerson College Los Angeles Grand Opening Gala, March 2014
Emerson College Los Angeles Grand Opening Gala, March 2014. Photo by Angela Weiss/Getty Images Entertainment Collection/Getty Images

Emerson College is a well-known school of the arts in Boston, Massachusetts, so the institution's expansion into Southern California was a long time coming. Emerson College Los Angeles (ELA) combines housing, classrooms, studios, theaters, cafes, administrative offices, and underground parking all under one roof.

About ELA:

Architect: Thom Mayne and Morphhosis
Location: 5960 W. Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, California
Year Completed: 2014
Size: 120,000 gross square feet (11,148 gross square meters
Software Used: AECOsim Building Designer, MicroStation, Bentley Navigator, and GenerativeComponents from Bentley Systems

Source: Emerson College Los Angeles , Morphosis website [accessed January 12, 2016]

06
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Cooper Union Building, 2009

Cooper Union Building Designed by Thom Mayne, 2009, Cooper Square, NYC
Cooper Union Building Designed by Thom Mayne, 2009, Cooper Square, NYC. Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images News Collection/Getty Images

Like most of Thom Mayne's asymmetrical buildings, the Cooper Union building is very difficult to photograph. Sometimes what looks like a cut-out in the facade is really a multi-story window. Open interior atrium spaces, multi-level grand stairways, "sky lobbies" and student terraces make this academic building more than a place to study. It's a learning environment to be enjoyed.

About Cooper Union:

Architect: Thom Mayne and Morphhosis
Location: 41 Cooper Square, New York City
Year Completed: 2009
Size: 175,000 gross square feet (16,258 gross square meters)

The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art calls Thom Mayne's addition to their campus 41 Cooper Square. Why? Because in New York City, like everywhere else, architecture is all about location, location, location.

Source: 41 Cooper Square, Morphosis website [accessed January 12, 2016]

07
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Hypo Alpe-Adria Center in Klagenfurt, Austria , 2002

Hypo Alpe-Adria Center, Klagenfurt, Austria, 2002
Hypo Alpe-Adria Center, Klagenfurt, Austria, 2002. Photo by Christian Richters courtesy The Hyatt Foundation at pritzkerprize.com

The Hypo Alpe-Adria Center in Klagenfurt, Austria is a vast, 25,000 square foot office complex. The facility includes retail space and a kindergarten. Pritzker Prize winning architect Thom Mayne gave the main structure a large domed roof to create the sense of plowed fields. The building seems to emerge from the earth, with walkways winding through the organic form.

08
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Silent Collisions, 2003

Silent Collisions, Belgium, by Thom Mayne
Silent Collisions, Belgium, by Thom Mayne. Photo by Kim Zwarts courtesy The Hyatt Foundation at pritzkerprize.com

Completed in 2003, Silent Collisions is a 2,400 square foot stage set designed by Pritzker Prize winning architect Thom Mayne for Frederic Flamand in Belgium.

09
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Caltrans District 7 Headquarters, 2004

Caltrans District 7 Headquarters, Los Angeles, California, 2004
Caltrans District 7 Headquarters, Los Angeles, California, 2004. Photo courtesy The Hyatt Foundation at pritzkerprize.com

The California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) District 7 Headquarters by Pritzker Prize winning architect Thom Mayne is an illusive, ever-changing office building located in the heart of Los Angeles, California. The structure is wrapped in sheathing that opens and closes according to outside conditions. When the sun is bright, the building appears closed and windowless. At dusk the building seems nearly transparent. At night, the four-story lobby becomes luminescent.

10
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Wayne L. Morse United States Courthouse, Eugene, Oregon, 2006

Courthouse complex in Eugene, Oregon with steel-ribbon facade reflecting fluidity and environment
Thom Mayne and Morphosis designed Wayne L. Morse United States Courthouse, Eugene, Oregon, 2006. Photo © Chris Phan, functoruser on flickr.com, Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

The Wayne Lyman Morse Courthouse includes six federal courtrooms with judge's chambers, support offices, an open atrium, jury assembly areas, and a cafeteria. The building took five years to design and two years to build.

About Wayne Lyman Morse United States Courthouse:

Architect: Thom Mayne and Morphhosis
Location: 405 East 8th Avenue, Eugene, Oregon
Year Completed: 2006
Size: 270,000 gross square feet (25,083 gross square meters)

Source: Wayne Lyman Morse United States Courthouse, Morphosis website [accessed June 16, 2013]

11
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United States Federal Building, San Francisco, 2007

United States Federal Building, San Franciso, CA, 2007, by Thom Mayne and Morphosis
United States Federal Building, San Franciso, CA, 2007, by Thom Mayne and Morphosis. Photo by Connie J. Spinardi/Moment Mobile Collection/Getty Images

The U.S. Federal Building in San Francisco took three years to design and four years to construct. The building houses offices for the Department of Health and Human Services, Social Security Administration, Department of State, Department of Labor, and the Department of Agriculture.

About the San Francisco Federal Building:

Architect: Thom Mayne and Morphhosis
Location: 90 7th Street, San Francisco, California
Year Completed: 2007
Stories: 18
Size: 605,000 gross square feet (56,205 gross square meters)

As an office building for the public, the Federal building provides its government employees conference rooms, a community center, day care, a fitness center, a public sky lobby, an outdoor public plaza, and a café.

Source: http://morphopedia.com/projects/san-francisco-federal-building, Morphosis website {accessed June 16, 2013]

12
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Diamond Ranch High School, Pomona, California, 1999

Thomas Mayne's Diamond Ranch High School, Pomona, California, 1999
Thomas Mayne's Diamond Ranch High School, Pomona, California, 1999. Photo by Carol M. Highsmith/Buyenlarge/Archive Photos Collection/Getty Images

For Thom Mayne, architecture and learning go together like architecture and eating, architecture and civics, and architecture and living. This high school for the Pomona Unified School District was one of Mayne's early commissions, before winning the Pritzker Prize.

About Diamond Ranch High School:

Architect: Thom Mayne and Morphhosis
Location: 100 Diamond Ranch Drive, Pomona, California
Year Completed: 1999
Size: 150,000 gross square feet (13,935 gross square meters)

"The intention of the whole is to challenge the message sent by a society that routinely communicates its disregard for the young by educating them in cheap institutional boxes surrounded by impenetrable chain link fencing."—from the Architects' description

Source: Diamond Ranch High School, Morphosis website [accessed June 16, 2013]