3 World Trade Center Plans and Drawings by Rogers (2006-2016)

01
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Designs for Greenwich Street

World Trade Center Office Towers, Designs From September 2006
Greenwich Street Skyscrapers Center on Tower 3 World Trade Center Office Towers, Designs From September 2006. Image by RRP, Team Macarie via Getty Images/Getty Images News Collection/Getty Images

Pritzker Laureate Richard Rogers developed a unique design for Tower 3 at 175 Greenwich Street, New York City. Browse this gallery for early sketches, renderings, and plans, along with some later design changes.

Tower 3 was always designed to be one of the tallest buildings in New York.

Architect Richard Rogers designed the skyscraper at 3 World Trade Center to capitalize on its  central location on the World Trade Center site. In Daniel Libeskind's Master Plan, the height of each tower diminishes from 1WTC. Tower 3 will, then, be the third tallest skyscraper on the WTC redevelopment site.

When presented on September 7, 2006, the design for 3WTC had the skyscraper rising 71 stories and 1,155 feet, offering panoramic views and abundant office space. Three international architects presented their designs for the World Trade Center site:

Source: Press Release, Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, September 7, 2006 [accessed August 2, 2015]

02
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Model of Tower 3 at Ground Zero

Architect's Rendering
175 Greenwich Street Model #7 for World Trade Center Tower 3 at 175 Greenwich Street. Rendering: RRP, courtesy of Silverstein Properties

Tower 3 at the new World Trade Center will use a structural load-sharing system of diamond-shaped braces.

All corners of Tower 3 will be column-free. This will allow people in the offices to enjoy uninterrupted, circular views of New York City.

"The defining aspect of 3 WTC," claims the developer's website, "is its load-sharing system of diamond-shaped bracing, which helps to articulate the building's east-west configuration. This allows unimpeded 360-degree panoramic views of New York."

Source: 3 World Trade Center, Silverstein Properties, Inc [accessed August 2, 2015]

03
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Tower 3 Looking Robotic

Architect's Rendering
175 Greenwich Street Model #8 for World Trade Center Tower 3 at 175 Greenwich Street. Rendering: RRP, courtesy of Silverstein Properties

Unlike 1 WTC, the exterior design of 3 WTC has remained fairly constant.

Originally, in 2006, WTC Tower 3 was proposed to be:

  • 71 stories
  • 1, 155 feet above street level
  • 133,000 square feet of retail (73,000 square feet at or above street level)
  • 54 office floors (2.1 million square feet)
  • five trading floors of retail stores

By 2015, the developer's website, Silverstein Properties, Inc, was marketing these Building Facts:

  • 80 stories
  • 1,079 feet tall
  • 2.8 million rentable square feet of space
  • 150,000 square feet of retail on 5 floors

Sources: Press Release, Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, September 7, 2006 [accessed August 2, 2015]; 3 World Trade Center, Silverstein Properties, Inc [accessed September 2, 2015]

04
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World Trade Center Tower 3

Cortlandt Street Elevation of Tower 3 at the new World Trade Center site
175 Greenwich Street Cortlandt Street Elevation of Tower 3 at the new World Trade Center site. Image: RRP, courtesy Silverstein Properties

The upper levels of 3 WTC appear to straddle the lower levels. As a result, the base will appear to be interlocked with the upper part of the building.

Facing Greenwich Street, the three-level high lobby at Tower 3 will offer a "big picture window" onto the National 9/11 Memorial, according to architect Richard Rogers.

"We believe we have designed a transparent and legible building which responds both to the architectural and social context of the area, and one which will make a fitting contribution to the New York skyline,” said Rogers.

Source: Press Release, Lower Manhattan Development Corporation, September 7, 2006 [accessed August 2, 2015]

05
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Lobby Design of 175 Greenwich Street

Rendering of 3WTC Lobby design, look toward the Transit Hall
A 2006 Design for a 2015 Greenwich Street Rendering of 3WTC Lobby design, look toward the Transit Hall. Press kit photo courtesy Silverstein Properties, Inc

The lobby of 3 WTC is 64 feet tall and has windows. Lots of windows. And that's good for pedestrians along Greenwich Street in Lower Manhattan.

In June of 2015, Greenwich Street, which had been closed for nearly 50 years, opened to pedestrian traffic.

In the 1960s, the plans for the World Trade Center included the closing off of two main North / South city streets—Washington and Greenwich Streets. Ultimately, the 1973 Twin Towers were built on top of Washington Street, today's site of the National 9/11 Memorial.

But Daniel Libeskind's Master Plan proposal changed all that, opening Greenwich Street again.

Sources: Three World Trade Center Facts and Milestones (PDF); A Crossroads Decades Gone Will Reopen at the World Trade Center by David W. Dunlap, The New York Times, Jun 24, 2015 [accessed August 6, 2015]

06
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Transit Hall of World Trade Center Tower 3

Rendering of 3WTC Transit Hall exterior, nighttime view
175 Greenwich Street Rendering of 3WTC Transit Hall exterior, nighttime view. Press kit photo courtesy Silverstein Properties, Inc

Architect Rogers incorporates the transit feel into the design of Tower 3.

The base of Tower 3 is part lobby and part transit hall. Elevators and stairways not only access the skyscraper, but 3WTC has direct access to the NY (and NJ) transit system. Three World Trade Center sits right beside the Transportation Hub designed by Santiago Calatrava, but Rogers' design connects the buildings underground.

“Just as the twin towers were the products of their time, when the reigning architectural and urban design ethos was superblocks and massive structures," a Port Authority official told The New York Times, "today people want transit-oriented development, access to public transportation, the restoration of streets and the ability of pedestrians to walk up and down.”

Source: A Crossroads Decades Gone Will Reopen at the World Trade Center by David W. Dunlap, The New York Times, Jun 24, 2015 [accessed August 6, 2015]

07
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Greenwich Street Proposed Towers in 2006

Photomontage for 175 Greenwich Street at the World Trade Center site.
Tower 3 is 175 Greenwich Street 175 Greenwich Street, World Trade Center Site, New York City 2006 designed by Richard Rogers Partnership. Photomontage by Team Macarie, Courtesy Richard Rogers Partnership

In this illustration, architect Richard Rogers shows the relationship between 3 WTC (center) and the World Trade Center Towers 2 and 4.

This 2006 illustration highlights Tower 3, making it appear the tall monster amongst the three towers of Greenwich Street and towering above the photogenic oculus of the Transportation Hub.

However, Daniel Libeskind's Master Plan proposed that the height of each skyscraper would diminish from the 1776 foot height of One World Trade Center.

 The 2015 rendering may be a more accurate of the final product.

08
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World Trade Center Site in 2015

Rendering from 2015, proposed and built towers at World Trade Center site.
175 Greenwich Street Rendering from 2015, proposed and built towers at World Trade Center site. Press kit image by DBOX, 2015, courtesy Silverstein Properties, Inc (cropped)

 

Fumihiko Maki's Tower 4 opened in 2013. Tower 1, which used to be called Freedom Tower, opened in 2014. Developer Larry Silverstein struggled to find tenants enough to continue building Tower 3. And then, in 2015, the other shoe dropped on Tower 2.

By mid-2015, Foster's 2006 plan for 2 WTC was out, and BIG Plans for 2 World Trade Center were in. Tower 2 had an entirely new look, corporate on one side and a stepped residential look on another side. As renderings appeared of the WTC skyscrapers, onlookers noticed that the two unbuilt Greenwich Street buildings were beginning to settle into the landscape of Daniel Libeskind's Master Plan.

09
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Constructing Tower Three

For years the height for 3WTC had stalled at the podium level
Fits and Starts, Waiting for Tenants For years the height for 3WTC had stalled at the podium level. Press kit photo courtesy Silverstein Properties, Inc

Richard Rogers' design for 3 WTC has always looked like two buildings—a base with a tower on top (although much more elegant than Norman Foster's tower atop the Hearst Building). In fact, it was Richard Rogers' designed base that was constructed first and visible for years as progress on 3 WTC came to a grinding halt because of the 2008 global economic crisis. The Wall Street Journal reports what went wrong:

"Before the economic downturn, financial companies were expected to be the main tenants, and...2 and 3 World Trade Center—were designed with large podiums to serve as trading floors for banks. But since the economic downturn, banks—typically the main fuel for the office sector in New York—have been shrinking their footprints in the city and have been reluctant to make expensive decisions on real estate."

Enter the media and advertising companies.

Silverstein Properties, Inc., the developer of the WTC site, announced in 2013 that GroupM would be the first large tenant to occupy space at 3 WTC. The company signed a 20-year lease for 516,000 square feet of office space on nine of the lower floors. Construction of Tower 3, which had stalled at its base, could now continue with this proposed schedule:

  • December 2011: Foundation reaches ground level
  • Winter 2016: Steel tops out
  • Winter 2017: Building fully enclosed with curtain wall
  • Summer 2018: Temporary Certificate of Occupancy
  • End of 2018: Building opens

Sources: World Trade Center Tower May Rise After New Tenant Signs by Eliot Brown, The Wall Street Journal Online, July 8, 2013; GroupM to Move to 3 World Trade Center, Silverstein Properties, Inc at silversteinproperties.com/our-company/news/news/groupm-move-3-world-trade-center/; 2 WTC, 3 WTC & 4 WTC - FACT SHEET, Silverstein Properties Press Kit (PDF) [accessed August 6, 2015]

10
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What will be the final design of 3 WTC?

Will 3 WTC Have Antennae? Two Renderings From 2015
175 Greenwich Street Will 3 WTC Have Antennae? Two Renderings From 2015. Press kit images courtesy Silverstein Properties, Inc

Look carefully at these two photos. Notice a difference?

When BIG Plans for 2 World Trade Center were presented in 2015, new drawings appeared. Along with the the new stepped design for Tower 2, the Richard Rogers tower would also appear—but not always looking the same.

I guess we won't really know what the final design will be—will antennae give the building additional height or not? which design will prevail?—until it's actually done.

Even then, a new owner, like any new homeowner, may just decide to put on an addition.

11
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Tower 3 Rises

Tower 3, rising above the Transportation Hub, in May 2016
Tower 3, rising above the Transportation Hub, in May 2016. Photo by Joe Woolhead courtesy of Silverstein Properties, Inc.

In addition to 7 WTC, the largest and smallest towers are complete and open for business at the World Trade Center site. Up to now, a large space has been present between 1 World Trade Center and 4 World Trade Center. Today, with the rapid rise of 3 World Trade Center, the skyline has changed again.

If you were going to lease space in any of the upper floors on Greenwich Street, you'd better think hard about the north and south views. The panoramas marketed by Silverstein Properties can't possibly be accurate advertising. Remember that Tower 2 is higher than Tower 3, and that Tower 3 (under construction) is taller than its completed neighbor, Tower 4.  Perhaps this is why they completed 4WTC early—those tenants will have had a few years of unobstructed skylines before the other taller towers take up airspace.

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Craven, Jackie. "3 World Trade Center Plans and Drawings by Rogers (2006-2016)." ThoughtCo, Aug. 30, 2016, thoughtco.com/three-world-trade-plans-4065283. Craven, Jackie. (2016, August 30). 3 World Trade Center Plans and Drawings by Rogers (2006-2016). Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/three-world-trade-plans-4065283 Craven, Jackie. "3 World Trade Center Plans and Drawings by Rogers (2006-2016)." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/three-world-trade-plans-4065283 (accessed November 22, 2017).