Characteristics of Left Brain Dominant Students

Left brain dominant students. Characteristics: tidy and organized, goal setters, logical and rational thinkers, good at following directions. Tips: study in quiet spaces, take the lead in study groups, participate in scholastic competitions, write analytical essays.

ThoughtCo / Hilary Allison

While there are differences of opinion when it comes to brain hemisphere dominance, one thing seems clear: there are some students who are more comfortable with logic and reasoning than they are with creativity and intuition. These preferences are characteristic of people who are sometimes called left brain dominant.

Are you very organized? Do you believe that there is a right way and a wrong way to do things? Do you enjoy math homework more than English homework? If so, you may be left-brain dominant.

Characteristics of Left Brain Dominant Students

  • Work well with a daily task list
  • Tend to be the critic in class
  • Consider themselves naturally good at math or science
  • Are rational and logical
  • Perform research that is precise and well-documented
  • Enjoy setting goals
  • Find it easy to interpret information
  • Have a neat and tidy room
  • Answer questions spontaneously
  • Like to read and follow directions
  • Tend to be less emotionally open
  • Can listen to a long lecture without losing interest
  • Prefer action movies to romantic comedies
  • Tend to sit up when they read
  • Use precise language

Left Brain Dominant Students in Class

  • Find it easy to remember dates and processes
  • Enjoy going through long math calculations
  • Prefer the logical order of science
  • Excel at understanding grammar and sentence structure

Advice for Left Brain Dominant Students

  • Study in a quiet room to avoid distraction.
  • If you become impatient trying to explain concepts to other students, don't volunteer to tutor classmates.
  • If you like to take the lead in study groups, you might enjoy volunteer work.
  • Try to find opportunities to participate in the debate team, science fair, or math league.
  • When reading for pleasure, you might prefer non-fiction books.
  • Be aware that you might be more comfortable with factual questions and assignments, as opposed to open-ended questions.
  • Use your organization skills to keep your class notes and papers organized.
  • Keep your room organized to maintain order in your personal space.
  • Even if you disagree, try to refrain from arguing with your teachers.
  • When selecting assignments, choose analytical essays instead of creative writing.
  • If you find yourself frustrated with other students who don't take their work seriously, work alone if possible.
  • Be aware that you might find “free-thinking” teachers confusing.
  • Finally, take more risks and don’t be afraid to be creative.

With all of your factual knowledge, you might be a finalist on Jeopardy someday.