Too vs. Two vs. To: Common English Mistakes

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One of the most common of all mistakes in English is the incorrect usage of the homophones to, too, and two. 'To' is a preposition, 'too' a modifier and 'two' a number. Learn the differences below.

Too vs. Two vs. To

Too means "also" and is generally used at the end of a sentence. "Too" also indicates too much of a particular quality.

Examples:

That car is too expensive for me!
I'd love to come to the party, too.

Two is the written form of the number 2.

Examples:

There are two applicants for the job.
She has two cats.

To is generally used as a preposition. It is also used as part of the infinitive form of verbs.

Examples:

I gave the book to him.
The verb "to understand" is irregular.

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Beare, Kenneth. "Too vs. Two vs. To: Common English Mistakes." ThoughtCo, Mar. 3, 2018, thoughtco.com/too-vs-two-vs-to-1210754. Beare, Kenneth. (2018, March 3). Too vs. Two vs. To: Common English Mistakes. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/too-vs-two-vs-to-1210754 Beare, Kenneth. "Too vs. Two vs. To: Common English Mistakes." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/too-vs-two-vs-to-1210754 (accessed May 23, 2018).