Toyo Ito Architecture Portfolio

01
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Home-for-All, 13th Venice Biennale of Architecture

Exhibit room at Venice Biennale 2012, various sized boxes, Japanese model of a communal space structure suspended from poles
Home-for-All, Japan Exhibit at the 2012 International Architecture Exhibition in Venice, Italy. Photo © dalbera on flickr.com, Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0) (cropped-enhanced)

A few months before Toyo Ito became Pritzker Prize Laureate for 2013, his architecture team received the Golden Lion award for the exhibit Architecture. Possible here? Home-for-All.

Home-for-All is an initiative to develop community spaces for the Japanese people devastated by the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011. The Japanese Pavilion at the the 13th Biennale International Architecture in Venice, Italy exhibited a design made for the East Japan city of Rikuzentakata. The tsunami swept away everything, except for a forest of tall cedar trees. Ito's design project team used 19 of these trees as the basis for rebuilding the community's spirit—the communal gathering space is supported by the strength of the natural elements not destroyed by the sea.

In choosing Ito for architecture's highest international aware, the Pritzker Jury cited this public gathering space project: "His work in favor of 'Home-for-All' or small communal spaces for those affected by the earthquake in Japan in 2011 is a direct expression of his sense of social responsibility."

More Pictures of the Home-for-All Project:

About Ito's Architecture Portfolio:

Ideas. Exhibitions. Construction. This gallery of selected works by Toyo Ito not only shows the process of architecture, but also visually displays a life in architecture. As the 2013 Pritker Jury Citation begins:

" Throughout his career, Toyo Ito has been able to produce a body of work that combines conceptual innovation with superbly executed buildings. Creating outstanding architecture for more than 40 years, he has successfully undertaken libraries, houses, parks, theaters, shops, office buildings and pavilions, each time seeking to extend the possibilities of architecture. A professional of unique talent, he is dedicated to the process of discovery that comes from seeing the opportunities that lie in each commission and each site."

Source: Jury Citation, ©2013 The Hyatt Foundation

Selected Buildings by Toyo Ito:

  • White U House, 1976
  • Tower of Winds, 1986
  • Yatsushiro Municipal Museum, 1991
  • Dome in Odate, 1997
  • Sendai Mediatheque, 2000
  • Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, 2002
  • Matsumoto Performing Arts Centre, 2004
  • TOD'S Omotesando, 2004
  • Mikimoto Ginza, 2005
  • Meiso no Mori Municipal Funeral Hall, 2006
  • Tama Art University Library, 2007
  • Main Stadium for the World Games, 2009
  • Hotel Porta Fira, 2010
  • Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture, 2011
02
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White U House, 1976

Aerial view of structure shaped like a closed U or the letter D
White U House for Toyo Ito's sister, 1976, Nakano-ku, Tokyo, Japan. Photo by Koji Taki, courtesy pritzkerprize.com

About the U House:

This private residence was designed by Toyo Ito for his sister, after the death of her husband.

  • Location: Nakano-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Completed: 1976
  • Construction: reinforced concrete
  • Floors: 1 story
  • Floor Area: 1595.7 square feet (148.25 square meters)
  • Building Area: 1625.0 square feet (150.97 square meters)
  • Site Area: 3956.9 square feet (367.61 square meters)

Learn more about Ito's Architecture Portfolio >>>

Source: Project Description, Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects [accessed March 19, 2013]

NEXT: Tower of Winds, 1986 >>>

03
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Tower of Winds, 1986

Photo of large cylindrical 12 story structure, open, well-lit, light sculpture changing with wind
Tower of Winds in Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa, Japan. Photo by Tomio Ohashi, courtesy pritzkerprize.com

About the Tower of Winds:

Exploration of photo-responsive glass took Japanese architect Toyo Ito in the direction of a light sculpture. The structure appears to be a twelve-story tower, but it is only air and light. This "interactive architecture" changes appearance in response to wind speed.

  • Architect: & Associates, Architects
  • Location: Nishi-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan
  • Completed: 1986
  • Construction: steel frame
  • Building Area: 467.69 square feet (43.45 square meters)

Learn more about Ito's Architecture Portfolio >>>

Sources: Project Description, Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects; Royal Gold Medal 2006 [accessed March 19, 2013]

NEXT: Yatsushiro Municipal Museum, 1991 >>>

04
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Yatsushiro Municipal Museum, 1991

Modern silver-roofed structure takes the sweeping shape of the Japanese knoll upon which it stands
Municipal Museum in Yatsushiro-shi, Kumamoto, Japan. Photo by Tomio Ohashi, courtesy pritzkerprize.com

"Architects have made architecture too complex," Pritzker Prize winner Toyo Ito told the Associated Press. "We need to simplify it and use a language that everyone can understand....We have to base architecture on the environment."

About the Yatsushiro Municipal Museum:

Architecture becomes part of nature at Yatsushiro. A small hill was created on a plot of flat land, and the museum was built to hug the curved terrain. The architecture becomes part of the landscape.

  • Location: Yatsushiro, Kumamoto, Japan
  • Completed: 1991
  • Construction: reinforced concrete, steel frame
  • Floors: 4 stories, 1 basement
  • Floor Area: 36,794 square feet (3,418.30 square meters)
  • Building Area: 15,423 square feet (1,432.88 square meters)
  • Site Area: 88,514 square feet (8,223.20 square meters)

Learn more about Ito's Architecture Portfolio >>>

Sources: Project Description, Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects [accessed March 19, 2013]; Yatsushiro Municipal Museum, Japan, Royal Gold Medal 2006, RIBA Royal Institute of British Architects [accessed April 2, 2013]; "Pritzker Prize winner Ito seeks ideas in nature" by Elaine Kurtenbach, Associated Press Online, March 18, 2013 at bigstory.ap.org/article/pritzker-prize-winner-ito-seeks-ideas-nature [accessed April 2, 2013]

NEXT: Dome in Odatem 1997 >>>

05
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Dome in Odate, 1997

Photo of large, white dome used as a multipurpose facility, in the middle of Japanese farmland
Multipurpose Dome in Odate-shi, Akita, Japan. Photo by Mikio Kamaya, courtesy pritzkerprize.com

About the Multi-Use Dome:

  • Architect: Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects
  • Location: Odate, Akita, Japan
  • Completed: 1997
  • Construction: wood frame, steel frame

Learn more about Ito's Architecture Portfolio >>>

Source: Project Description, Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects [accessed March 19, 2013]

NEXT: Sendai Mediatheque, 2000 >>>

06
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Sendai Mediatheque, 2000

Library in Sendai, Japan, with each floor visible from the outside through large glass walls.
Sendai Mediatheque, a Library in Sendai-shi, Miyagi, Japan. Photo by Tomio Ohashi, courtesy pritzkerprize.com

About the Sendai Mediatheque:

Many people consider this media center to be Toyo Ito's breakthrough architectural work. Constructed of tubes, glass, and concrete, the floors seem to float in the outdoor light, reminding us of Ito's earlier adventures with air and light—Tower of Winds. A YouTube video taken from inside the building during the March 2011 earthquake shows the sturdiness of its construction. A YouTube animation by Telegram71 allows us to visualize its design and construction.

  • Architect: Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects
  • Location: Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi, Japan
  • Completed: 2000
  • Construction: steel frame, reinforced concrete
  • Floors: 7 stories, 2 basements
  • Building Area: 31,572 square feet (2,933.12 square meters)
  • Site Area: 42,504 square feet (3,948.72 square meters)

Learn more about Ito's Architecture Portfolio >>>

Sourcse: Project Description, Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects; Royal Gold Medal 2006 [accessed March 19, 2013]

NEXT: Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, 2002 >>>

07
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Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, 2002

Small, white box-like structure with irregular shaped openings on all five sides
2002 Serpentine Pavilion by Toyo Ito in Hyde Park, London. Photo by Toyo Ito & Associates Architects, courtesy pritzkerprize.com

About the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion:

  • Architect: Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects
  • Location: Kensington Gardens, London, UK
  • Temporary Structure Completed / Dismantled: 2002
  • Construction: steel frame
  • Floors: 1 story
  • Floor Area: 3,334.2 square feet (309.76 square meters)
  • Building Area: 3,334.2 square feet (309.76 square meters)

Learn More:

Source: Project Description, Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects [accessed March 19, 2013]

NEXT: Matsumoto Performing Arts Centre, 2004 >>>

08
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Matsumoto Performing Arts Centre, 2004

Wide, sweeping steps, white poles, of Matsumoto Hall near escalator lit by wall cut outs
Matsumoto Hall Grand Staircase and Escalator. Photo ©2009 Woranol Sattayavinij, japanese_craft_construction on flickr.com, CC BY 2.0,

About the Matsumoto Performing Arts Center:

  • Architect: Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects
  • Location: Matsumoto, Nagano, Japan
  • Completed: 2004
  • Construction: steel framed reinforced concrete, steel frame
  • Floors: 7 stories, 2 basements, 1 penthouse
  • Building Area: 76,209 square feet (7,080.02 square meters)
  • Site Area: 98,409 square feet (9,142.50 square meters)

Learn more about Ito's Architecture Portfolio >>>

Source: Project Description, Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects [accessed March 19, 2013]

NEXT: TOD'S Omotesando, 2004 >>>

09
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TOD'S Omotesando, 2004

Photo of top of the TOD'S building by Toyo Ito, with irregular-shaped windows
Toyo Ito's TOD'S Store on Omotesando, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, Japan. Photo ©2007 Rory Hyde, roryrory on flickr.com, Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic

About TOD'S Omotesando Building:

This upscale leather goods store and offices may look like the Mikimoto building in Ginza, but the construction is not the same. These walls are glass and concrete, from a design more similar to the Serpentine Gallery in London.

  • Architect: Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects
  • Location: Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Completed: 2004
  • Construction: reinforced concrete, steel frame
  • Floors: 7 stories, 1 basement
  • Floor Area: 27,435 square feet (2,548.84 square meters)
  • Building Area: 4,322.2 square feet (401.55 square meters)
  • Site Area: 5,556.7 square feet (516.23 square meters)

Learn more about Ito's Architecture Portfolio >>>

Sources: Project Description, Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects; Royal Gold Medal 2006; galinsky.com; arcspace.com [accessed March 19, 2013]

NEXT: Mikimoto Ginza, 2005 >>>

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Mikimoto Ginza, 2005

Tokyo high-rise with no discernable floors but windows cut out in irregular shapes
Mikimoto Store in Ginza Area of Tokyo, Japan. Photo ©2007 Rory Hyde, roryrory on flickr.com, Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic

About the Mikimoto Ginza:

When you visit Tokyo, the pearl jewelry of Mikimoto will be found in the high-end Ginza shopping district. Architect Toyo Ito designed a tube-like structure for the store and offices.

With no internal columns, concrete was poured between multiple steel plates, forming sandwich-like walls. Panels were prefabricated offsite, assembled and welded onsite, and then more concrete was poured as a final covering. Random, odd-shaped openings were then cut through the walls.

  • Location: Chuo-ku, Tokyo, Japan
  • Completed: 2005
  • Construction: steel frame and concrete; reinforced concrete
  • Floors: 9 stories , 1 basement
  • Floor Area: 23,735 square feet (2,205.02 square meters)
  • Building Area: 2,558.5 square feet (237.69 square meters)
  • Site Area: 2,968 square feet (275.74 square meters)

Learn more about Ito's Architecture Portfolio >>>

Sources: Project Description, Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects; OpenBuildings.com [accessed March 19, 2013]

NEXT: Meiso no Mori Municipal Funeral Hall, 2006 >>>

11
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Meiso no Mori Municipal Funeral Hall, 2006

Simple structure by round body of water, wavy roof, 5 rooms behind glass walls, 1 windowless room
Municipal Funeral Hall and Crematorium in Kakamigahara-shi, Gifu, Japan. Photo courtesy pritzkerprize.com

About the Funeral Hall and Crematorium:

  • Architect: Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects
  • Location: Kakamigahara, Gifu, Japan
  • Completed: 2006
  • Construction: reinforced concrete
  • Floors: 2 stories
  • Floor Area: 24,376 square feet (2,264.57 square meters)
  • Building Area: 24,430 square feet (2,269.66 square meters)
  • Site Area: 72,075 square feet (6,695.97 square meters)

Learn more about Ito's Architecture Portfolio >>>

Source: Project Description, Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects [accessed March 19, 2013]

NEXT: Tama Art University Library, 2007 >>>

12
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Tama Art University Library, 2007

Photo of curved building in Tokyo, Japan, two large stories, large arched windows and entrance.
Tama Art University Library, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo, Japan. Photo © Ibone Santiago, japanese_craft_construction on flickr.com, Attribution 2.0 Generic

About the Tama Art University Library:

  • Architect: Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects
  • Location: Hachioji, Tokyo, Japan
  • Completed: 2007
  • Construction: steel, concrete mixed structure; reinforced concrete construction
  • Floors: 2 stories, 1 basement
  • Floor Area: 60,703 square feet (5,639.46 square meters)
  • Building Area: 23,945 square feet (2,224.59 square meters)

Learn more about Ito's Architecture Portfolio >>>

Source: Project Description, Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects [accessed March 19, 2013]

NEXT: Main Stadium for the World Games, 2009 >>>

13
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Main Stadium for the World Games, 2009

Aerial view of large, open, round Olympic-sized stadium.
Main Stadium for The World Games 2009, Kaohsiung, Taiwan R.O.C. Photo by Fu Tsu Construction Co., Ltd., courtesy pritzkerprize.com

About the Stadium:

The Kaohsiung National Stadium was built by Japanese architect Toyo Ito for the 2009 World Games in Taiwan. Shaped like an ancient serpent, the stadium was one of the first sports venues to rely on solar energy for its operations.

  • Location: Kaohsiung, Taiwan
  • Completed: 2009
  • Construction: steel frame, reinforced concrete
  • Floors: 3 stories; 2 basements

Learn more about Ito's Architecture Portfolio >>>

Source: Project Description, Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects [accessed March 19, 2013]

NEXT: Hotel Porta Fira, 2010 >>>

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Hotel Porta Fira, 2010

Hotel Porta Fira, under construction in 2009, Barcelona, Spain. Photo © Sharon Mollerus, clairity on flickr.com, Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)

About the Hotel Porta Fira:

Ito's Torres Porta Fira project consists of two towers, a hotel and an office building. The hotel, shown here, is cylinder-like, but twists unevenly as it rises into the Barcelona skies. The exterior skin of red-colored aluminum tubes allows this kinetic architecture. Tne nearby office building has a glass curtain wall exterior, with views of an inner red-colored core that visually counterbalances the hotel building's architecture.

  • Architect: Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects
  • Location: Barcelona, Spain
  • Completed: 2010
  • Construction: reinforced concrete
  • Floors: 26 stories, 2 basement, 1 penthouse
  • Building Area: 51,678 square feet (4,801.08 square meters)
  • Site Area: 62,168 square feet (5,775.55 square meters)
  • Awards: Emporis Skyscraper Award 2010
  • Hotel Website: hotelbarcelonaportafira.com

Learn More:

Source: Project Description, Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects [accessed March 19, 2013]

NEXT: Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture, 2011 >>>

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Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture, 2011

Modern temple-like structure designed by Toyo Ito, near water and mountains.
Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture in Imabari-shi, Ehime, Japan. Photo by Daici Ano courtesy pritzkerprize.com

About Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture (TIMA):

To create his legacy museum and learning center, Toyo Ito recreated two of his most famous residences: the Steel Hut, used as a pavilion for exhibitions, and the Silver Hut, a space for workshops and research.

  • Location: Imabari, Ehime, Japan. Imabari was the hometown of architect Kenzo Tange, who some call the father of Metabolism in Architecture.
  • Completed: 2011
  • Construction: Steel Hut—steel frame, reinforced concrete; Silver Hut—reinforced concrete, steel frame
  • Floors: Both Steel Hut and Silver Hut are each 2 stories
  • Floor Area: Steel Hut—1819 square feet (168.99 square meters); Silver Hut—2,027.1 square feet (188.32 square meters)
  • Building Area: Steel Hut—2098.1 square feet (194.92 square meters); Silver Hut—1811.8 square feet (168.32 square meters)
  • Site Area: 67,763 square feet (6,295.36 square meters)

Learn more about Ito's Architecture Portfolio >>>

Sources: About TIMA, Toyo Ito Museum of Architecture website; Project Description, Toyo Ito & Associates, Architects [accessed March 19, 2013]

More Architecture by Toyo Ito:

  • White U House, 1976
  • Tower of Winds, 1986
  • Yatsushiro Municipal Museum, 1991
  • Dome in Odate, 1997
  • Sendai Mediatheque, 2000
  • Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, 2002
  • Matsumoto Performing Arts Centre, 2004
  • TOD'S Omotesando, 2004
  • Mikimoto Ginza, 2005
  • Meiso no Mori Municipal Funeral Hall, 2006
  • Tama Art University Library, 2007
  • Main Stadium for the World Games, 2009
  • Hotel Porta Fira, 2010
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Craven, Jackie. "Toyo Ito Architecture Portfolio." ThoughtCo, Aug. 9, 2016, thoughtco.com/toyo-ito-architecture-portfolio-177466. Craven, Jackie. (2016, August 9). Toyo Ito Architecture Portfolio. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/toyo-ito-architecture-portfolio-177466 Craven, Jackie. "Toyo Ito Architecture Portfolio." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/toyo-ito-architecture-portfolio-177466 (accessed October 19, 2017).