Tunica

Camillus
Camillus. Clipart.com

Definition:

The tunica was the garment of the Roman. In English, we call it a tunic. In modern life, we tend to wear a tunic as a shirt, but in ancient Rome, the tunic served as sleeveless or sleeved shirt and skirt (in the days before trousers showed masculinity). It could be belted so the top half bloused over, which would shorten it from its normal mid-leg-length. Workmen would wear only the tunic, but the Roman attending state functions in Rome would have to put the cumbersome toga on top of it. Like the toga, the basic tunica was woolen and un-dyed. There could also be under tunics of other materials, like linen, and under it all, there might be a type of loincloth known as a subligaculum [see leather bikinis].

Reference: The World's Progress: Roman social life and literature. Age of chivalry, by Delphian Society

Examples: Slaves were given one tunica a year or every other year.