University of Virginia Photo Tour

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University of Virginia Photo Tour

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University of Virginia (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

The University of Virginia (UVA), founded in 1819, takes pride in its attractive Jeffersonian architecture. Thomas Jefferson, the founder, encouraged UVA students to embrace higher education by creating a beautiful learning environment. He sought for his students to form a community through his Academical Village which consists of the Rotunda, the Lawn, and the Pavilions. Through the years, the campus has grown with Jefferson’s vision as you'll see in the photos that follow.

The University of Virginia consistently ranks as one of the top public universities in the country, and it also made the About.com College Admissions lists for top southeastern colleges, top Virginia colleges, and top business schools for undergraduates. For its research strengths, UVA was awarded membership in the Association of American Universities, and it's strong programs in the liberal arts and sciences earned it a chapter of the prestigious Phi Beta Kappa honor society.

The Rotunda

With a statue of Jefferson in front of it, the Rotunda stands proudly at the end of the Academical Village. Jefferson modeled the Rotunda after Rome’s Pantheon, so it is the focal point of the Academical Village with Pavilions and gardens surrounding it. An annex was added to it in 1853, but due to a fire, only the circular brick walls survived. The Rotunda was then reconstructed as a Beaux Arts interpretation of Roman style in order to expand the library, create ceremonial space, and widen the skylight. Today, the Rotunda is one of the iconic buildings on the UVA campus.

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The Lawn at the University of Virginia

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The Lawn at the University of Virginia (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

The Lawn lies between the Rotunda and Pavilions that make up the Academical Village. It is considered an honor to live in the prestigious Lawn rooms because one would be living at the university’s center and in one of the original Jeffersonian buildings. They are also ranked among the best college dorms out there. The rooms are available only to seniors and come fully furnished. Each Pavilion along the Lawn possesses distinctive traits that heighten the appeal.

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Pavilion IV at the University of Virginia

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Pavilion IV at the University of Virginia (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Pavilion IV and its 9 companions line the East Lawn as housing for students in Jefferson’s highly valued Academical Village. Its first occupant was George Blaetterman, professor of Modern Languages, in the early 1800s, but when he painted the exterior red, the pristine image was defiled. To complete the perfect image, Jefferson wanted Pavilion residents to plant, design, and maintain their own garden like the famed Professor Schele de Vere’s box garden behind Pavilion IV.

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Rouss Hall at the University of Virginia

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Rouss Hall at the University of Virginia (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Originally, Rouss Hall housed the Physical Laboratory, but now conjoins with Robertson Hall to house the McIntire School of Commerce. Both structures fit the cherished Jeffersonian architectural style that permeates the campus and creates a formidable partnership adjacent to the Lawn and around the central courtyard. The McIntire School of Commerce has a highly regarded business program that offers masters’ degrees in Commerce, Accounting, and Management.

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Old Cabell Hall at the University of Virginia

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Old Cabell Hall at the University of Virginia (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Old Cabell Hall officially houses the College of Arts and Sciences as well as provides a venue for music performances. Its auditorium seats 994 people and possesses a Skinner organ donated by Andrew Carnegie back in 1906. The organ was dedicated to the hall during a Samuel Baldwin recital a year after the piano was donated. An eleven-panel mural titled “The Student’s Progress” emphasizes Jefferson’s and any other student’s value of their educational journey at UVA.

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Lambeth House at the University of Virginia

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Lambeth House at the University of Virginia (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

What used to be a private home for Dr. William A. Lambeth, is now the headquarters for the Curry School of Education. The Lambeth House stands out because of its impressive view over the formal gardens.

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Brooks Hall at the University of Virginia

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Brooks Hall at the University of Virginia (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Brooks Hall houses the Anthropology Department with its subdivisions of sociocultural, archaeological, and linguistic areas. The building originally opened as the Natural Science Cabinet, complete as a museum with life-size mammoth and dinosaur exhibits, but closed in 1940. The building itself served as a point of controversy in the 1970s because its Victorian Gothic architectural style differed from the Jeffersonian tradition of the rest of the buildings on campus. At one point, the building faced demolition, but due to public intervention, Brooks Hall, with its gargoyles and famous natural historian names written on its façade was preserved.

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Page House at the University of Virginia

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Page House at the University of Virginia (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

You can find the Page House along with the other residence halls in the McCormick Road Residence Area. The Page House holds 125 students in its double occupancy rooms, with the exception of 30 small, single rooms. Each room is fully furnished to help first-year students transition from their life at home to life at UVA. The Page House was added to the family of residence halls to accommodate the increase in student population following World War II.

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University Chapel at UVA

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University Chapel at UVA (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

The university chapel was built for non-denominational services for community members and also as a response to the accusations that UVA was a heathen place. With its Gothic Revival architectural style, the university chapel was built to aspire towards heaven. Inside, its 46 pews seat 250 people, but worship services are no longer held there. Instead, weddings and memorial services help keep the chapel in use, not to mention extensive building maintenance and preservation of its exterior.

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Bavaro Hall at the University of Virginia

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Bavaro Hall at the University of Virginia (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Previously known as the Curry School of Education, Bavaro Hall serves as an administrative hub for UVA. It houses 55 faculty offices, 10 conference rooms, 4 administrative offices, a lecture hall, and a two-story atrium. Just the first floor of the building consists of an area for student services, the dean’s office, conference and meeting spaces, and a coffee bar. The unique combination of red brick, limestone, and wood represents the conglomeration of different building materials as well as its various services for the campus.

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Clark Hall at the University of Virginia

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Clark Hall at the University of Virginia (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Clark Hall serves as home to the Department of Environmental Sciences which branches out into ecology, geosciences, hydrology, and atmospheric sciences. Because of the continual partnership between environmental sciences and engineering, Clark Hall also houses the Brown Science and Engineering Library which allows room for study and teleconferencing. In earlier years, it housed the School of Law, but after its conversion in 2003, only two murals serve as remnants of the school by portraying allegories on Mosaic and Roman Law.

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Bryan Hall and McIntire Amphitheater at UVA

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Bryan Hall and McIntire Amphitheater at UVA (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

The amphitheater holds student gatherings and music events. The venue continually hosts events—whether it’s fundraising, performances, festivals, ROTC drills, or alumni gatherings. Its first use occurred at the centennial celebration of UVA, attended by alumni and even President Woodrow Wilson. The first head of the School of Architecture designed its concrete, arcing seating in hopes of helping students feel a sense of community within the school.

Bryan Hall, located adjacent to the amphitheater, is home to the University of Virginia's English Department.

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Cocke Hall at the University of Virginia

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Cocke Hall at the University of Virginia (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Cocke Hall was completed in 1898 and originally housed the Mechanical Lab. Now, it holds mostly classrooms and offices for the Classics and Philosophy Departments as well as the J.S. Constantine Library. Classics majors, faculty, and grad students have 24-hour access to almost three thousand texts.

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Garrett Hall at the University of Virginia

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Garrett Hall at the University of Virginia (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Garrett Hall originally replaced Carr's Hill as "The Commons" dining hall in 1909. Waiters would serve students during those days and if you were nice to them, you might even get extra portions. During the World War II era, the waiters were replaced by a student self-serve line. Eventually, Garrett Hall became an office space with lowered ceilings, a filled in foyer, and an annex for the university's first computer center. Today, after numerous renovations, Garrett Hall serves as the Frank Batten School of Leadership and Public Policy.

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Gilmer Hall at the University of Virginia

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Gilmer Hall at the University of Virginia (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Gilmer Hall houses the Biology and Psychology Departments and doubles as a research facility. It was named after Francis Walker Gilmer who helped Thomas Jefferson recruit the original faculty for UVA. The Hall opened in 1963 and there are still professors from the Gilmer Hall opening that continue to teach at UVA. The departments collaborate closely with the University Medical Center and Mountain Lake and Biological stations around the university.

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Minor Hall at the University of Virginia

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Minor Hall at the University of Virginia (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Minor Hall opened in 1911 as the original home to the School of Law. Now, it supports the College of Arts and Sciences with classrooms and offices. The Hall exemplifies the multipurpose functionality of UVA’s buildings because up until 1932, it housed the Speech and Drama Department. The College of Arts and Sciences also works closely with the Carter G. Woodson Institute.

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Thornton Hall at the University of Virginia

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Thornton Hall at the University of Virginia (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

Thornton Hall houses the School of Engineering and Applied Science. The school offers specific degrees in computer, mechanical, civil, chemical, biomedical, electrical, and aerospace engineering as well as materials science. The hall now holds the Center for Diversity which increases recruitment and retention of underrepresented student populations in STEM. The hall also serves as a center for the sustainability movement in the Energy Initiative at UVA, for Human-Computer Interaction, and the MAE Design Lab where 20 computer workstations with engineering design and analysis software can be used by engineering students.

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UVA Medical School

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UVA Medical School (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

The Medical School revolves around the Claude Moore Medical Education Building which consists of two floors—the Medical Simulation Center and the Clinical Skills Center. This way, students can practice medicine in theory and with their hands as a fundamental part of their education. Other amenities include the Health Sciences Library which provides a 24-hour study area and online resources for medical research and the Learning Studio for interactive learning. The Cancer Center, Battle Building (children’s hospital), and University hospital (ICU) act as extensions of the Medical School in order to take medical students’ education outside of the classroom.

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Special Collections Library at UVA

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Special Collections Library at UVA (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

The Special Collections Library at UVA boasts over 16 million manuscripts, archival records, rare books, maps, broadsides, photographs, and audio/video recordings. The library is well-known for its extensive collection of American and British Literature, history about the State of Virginia, UVA, and history of the southeastern region of the United States. Special Collections Library stands next to Alderman Library, the campus's main library. In the front of the building, a pediment sculpture based on John 8:23 states, “Ye shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you free” to encourage UVA students in their quest for knowledge.

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UVA Bookstore

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UVA Bookstore (click image to enlarge). Photo Credit: Allen Grove

The UVA bookstore is a non-profit business that includes a pharmacy, alumni specials, graduation items, textbooks, spirit clothing, and school supplies. The bookstore exhibits immense school pride by selling books signed by alumni and stocking books about UVA and Jefferson. The Darden Exchange program is an exclusive means of funding for the Darden School of Business while the bookstore offers Cavalier Computers and an outlet for UVA bargains. A portion of every sale goes back to the University for Endowment for Excellence, a student program that funds need-based scholarships.

To learn more about the University of Virginia and what it takes to get admitted, check out the UVA profile and this GPA, SAT and ACT graph for UVA admissions.

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Chang, Anna. "University of Virginia Photo Tour." ThoughtCo, Oct. 18, 2017, thoughtco.com/university-of-virginia-photo-tour-788532. Chang, Anna. (2017, October 18). University of Virginia Photo Tour. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/university-of-virginia-photo-tour-788532 Chang, Anna. "University of Virginia Photo Tour." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/university-of-virginia-photo-tour-788532 (accessed January 16, 2018).