Verb + Preposition Combinations

01
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Verbs + About

Studying is too much
Example: She is worried about her exams. PeopleImages / Getty Images

The following verbs are commonly used with 'about'. Each verb + about combination includes an example sentence to provide context.

  • be about something - That book is about his experiences in Africa.
  • argue about (doing) something - The boys argued about which bus to take.
  • be concerned about (doing) something - I'm concerned about your grades.
  • be worried about (doing) something - She is worried about her exams.
  • boast about (doing) something - Thomas boasted about his golfing ability.
  • decide about (doing) something - Anna decided about her goals.
  • dream about (doing) something - Mark dreams about becoming a ballet dancer.
  • protest about (doing) something - The students protested about the invasion.

02
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Verbs + Against

The following verbs are commonly used with 'against'. Each verb + against combination includes an example sentence to provide context.

  • be against something / someone - I am against the new regulation.
  • insure something against something - We insured our house against storm damage.
  • protest against (doing) something - The students are protesting against the invasion.

03
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Verbs + At

The following verbs are commonly used with 'at'. Each verb + at combination includes an example sentence to provide context.

  • be at something - The exhibition is at the modern art gallery.
  • glance at something - Can I glance at that for a moment?
  • guess at something - She guessed at the answer.
  • hint at something - My mom hinted at my present.
  • marvel at something - I marvel at your math abilities.

04
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Verbs + For

The following verbs are commonly used with 'for'. Each verb + for combination includes an example sentence to provide context.

  • be for something / someone - I'm for Mayor Martini.
  • account for something - That accounts for his success.
  • allow for something - I think you need to allow for misunderstandings.
  • apologize for something / someone - Jackson apologized for his rude behavior.
  • blame someone for (doing) something - I blame Janet for the broken pottery.
  • care for (doing) something / someone - He doesn't care for playing golf.
  • charge someone for (doing) something - The accountant charged him $400 for his advice.
  • count for something - Your good marks count for 50% of your grade.
  • earmark something for a use - Congress earmarked $6 million for safety improvements.
  • pay for someone / something - Let me pay for Tom.

05
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Verbs + From

The following verbs are commonly used with 'from'. Each verb + from combination includes an example sentence to provide context.

  • bar someone from (doing) something - Jack has barred Jennifer from visiting his daughter.
  • bar someone from a place - The police barred Peter from the shopping mall.
  • benefit from (doing) something - Students benefit from listening to news reports on the radio.
  • derive something from something - He derived the meaning from the context of the sentence.
  • deter someone from (doing) something - Please deter your children from walking across busy avenues.
  • differ from something - Our cheese differs from our competitor's cheese because of its superior quality.
  • distinguish one thing from another thing - I'm afraid he can't distinguish a British accent from a Irish accent.
  • distract someone from something - Please distract Tim from the television.
  • exempt someone from (doing) something - The judge exempted the young man from doing extra community service.
  • expel someone from a place - The children were expelled form school for their bad behavior.
  • refrain from (doing) something - Nancy refrains from smoking at work.
  • resign from (doing) something - Jacques resigned from his position.
  • result from (doing) something - The unrest results from our politicians lack of seriousness about the situation.
  • stem from (doing) something - The poor results stem from his lack of experience.
  • suffer from (doing) something - He will suffer from studying too little.

06
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Verbs + In

The following verbs are commonly used with 'in'. Each verb + about in combination includes an example sentence to provide context.

  • be absorbed in (doing) something - Peter was absorbed in reading his book.
  • confide in someone - I confided in Tom my desire to find a new job.
  • be engrossed in (doing) something - I surprised Jane who was engrossed in watching TV.
  • implicate someone in (doing) something - The boss implicated Peter in the crime.
  • involve someone in (doing) something - You should involve your children in physical activities.
  • result in something - His decision resulted in increased profits.
  • specialize in (doing) something - My daughter specializes in teaching physics.
  • succeed in (doing) something - Jane succeeded in getting a new job.

07
of 10

Verbs + Of

The following verbs are commonly used with 'of'. Each verb + of combination includes an example sentence to provide context.

  • accuse someone of (doing) something - His mother accused him of eating the entire cake.
  • convict someone of (doing) something - Johnson was convicted of armed robbery.
  • remind someone of (doing) something / someone - Peter reminded me of Tom.
  • suspect someone of (doing) something - The police suspect Agnes of breaking into the bank.

08
of 10

Verbs + On

The following verbs are commonly used with 'on'. Each verb + on combination includes an example sentence to provide context.

  • be on something / someone - She is on Peter to do his best.
  • base something on something - I base my conclusions on market research.
  • blame something on someone - She blames the lack of interest on the teacher's poor explanation.
  • concentrate something on (doing) something - They concentrate their efforts on improving the infrastructure.
  • congratulate someone on (doing) something - Tom congratulated Lisa on getting her diploma.
  • decide on something - I've decided to get a new job.
  • depend on someone / (doing) something - We depend on our customers' suggestions.
  • elaborate on (doing) something - Can you elaborate on the process?
  • impose on someone - The mother imposed severe restrictions on her daughter.
  • insist on something / someone doing something - I insist on Peter's studying every day for two hours.
  • pride oneself on (doing) something - I like to pride myself on my ability to concentrate.

09
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Verbs + To

The following verbs are commonly used with 'to'. Each verb + to combination includes an example sentence to provide context.

  • answer to someone - I answer to Ms Smith.
  • appeal to someone - Let me appeal to you for your help in this matter.
  • apply oneself to (doing) something - I think you should apply yourself to getting a degree.
  • apply to something - He applied glue to the board.
  • attend to (doing) something - Chris attended to doing the grocery shopping.
  • attribute something to someone - Professor Samson attributes this painting to Leonardo.
  • be resigned to (doing) something - I'm resigned to not having any success in that field.
  • commit oneself to (doing) something - She committed herself to finding a new job.
  • confess to (doing) something - The boy confessed to stealing the apple.
  • devote oneself to (doing) something - I'm going to devote myself to playing the piano after I retire.
  • prefer one thing to another thing - I prefer roast potatoes to French fries.
  • react to something - He reacted poorly to the news.
  • refer to (doing) something - Please refer to your notes.
  • refer someone to someone - I referred Ken to Doctor Jones.
  • resort to (doing) something - Please don't resort to violence.
  • see to (doing) something - I'll see to those chores.
  • subject someone to (doing) something - She subjected her daughter to swimming lessons.

10
of 10

Verbs + With

The following verbs are commonly used with 'with'. Each verb + with combination includes an example sentence to provide context.

  • acquaint someone with something - I acquainted Mary with French cuisine.
  • associate something with (doing) someone - Susan associates chocolate with childhood.
  • be faced with (doing) something - She's faced with working overtime this weekend.
  • charge someone with (doing) something - The officer charged Mr Smith with blackmail.
  • clutter with something - The room was cluttered with paper.
  • coincide with something - My birthday coincides with a national holiday.
  • collide with something - The car collided with a truck and blocked traffic.
  • comply with something - He complies with each and every order.
  • confront someone with something - I confronted Vivian with the evidence.
  • confuse someone / something with someone / something - I'm afraid I confused you with someone else.
  • cram with something - My closed is crammed with dirty clothes!
  • deal with someone / (doing) something - I can't deal with so much overtime.
  • discuss something with someone - I'd like to discuss our next conference with the boss.
  • ingratiate oneself with someone - Ingratiate yourself with the headmaster and your life with be easy!
  • meet with something - The congressman met with strong opposition to his plan.
  • pack with something - Peter packed his case with extra brochures.
  • plead with someone - He plead with his teacher to give him one more chance.
  • provide someone with something - The instructor provided the students with a number of examples.
  • tamper with something - Do not tamper with this equipment.
  • trust someone with something - I trust Bob with all of my financial information.

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Beare, Kenneth. "Verb + Preposition Combinations." ThoughtCo, Mar. 28, 2017, thoughtco.com/verb-and-preposition-combinations-1210015. Beare, Kenneth. (2017, March 28). Verb + Preposition Combinations. Retrieved from https://www.thoughtco.com/verb-and-preposition-combinations-1210015 Beare, Kenneth. "Verb + Preposition Combinations." ThoughtCo. https://www.thoughtco.com/verb-and-preposition-combinations-1210015 (accessed September 20, 2017).