Weather Safety Slogans

Short sayings that instruct on what to do when severe weather strikes

Weather safety (knowing what actions to take to best protect yourself and others around you when severe weather strikes) is something we all should know BEFORE we need to use it. ​And while checklists and infographics make learning weather safety easier, nothing is a better tool than weather slogans.

The following simple, short phrases take only minutes to memorize but could one day help save your life! 

Lightning

thunder roars wx safety slogan
NOAA's lightning safety warning sign. NOAA NWS

Lightning Safety slogan 1:

When Thunder Roars, Go Indoors!

Lightning can strike up to 10 miles away from a thunderstorm, which means it can strike you before the rain even begins. Or long after the rain stops. If you can hear thunder, you're close enough to the storm to be struck, which is why you should immediately go indoors. 

Lightning Safety slogan 2: 

When You See a Flash, Dash (inside)!

NOAA introduced this slogan in June 2016 to promote lightning safety for those who are deaf or hard of hearing and can't hear the sound of thunder. This community of people should seek shelter whenever they first see a flash of lightning or feel a rumble of thunder since both are cues that the storm is close enough for lightning to strike. 

Watch the NWS lightning safety Public Service Announcement (PSA), here.

Floods

TADD wx safety sign
NOAA's Turn Around Don't Drown® warning sign. NOAA NWS

Flood Safety slogan: 

Turn Around, Don't Drown®

Over half of all flood-related deaths occur when vehicles are driven into flood waters. If you encounter flooded areas, you should NEVER attempt to cross them, no matter how low the water level looks. (It only takes a mere 6 inches of floodwater to sweep you off of your feet and 12 inch-deep waters to stall or float your car away.) Don't risk it! Instead, turn around and find a path that isn't blocked by water.   

Watch the NWS flood safety Public Service Announcement (PSA), here.

Extreme Heat

look before you lock heat safety
A National Highway Traffic Safety Administration heat stroke campaign poster. NHTSA

Heat Safety slogan: 

Look Before You Lock!

During warm spring, summer, and fall months, Outdoor heat and humidity is bad enough, but concentrate high temperatures within a small space, like an enclosed vehicle, and the danger only increases. Infants, young children, and pets are most at risk for because they're bodies are unable to cool themselves as well as adult bodies. They all also tend to sit in the back seat of a car, where they're sometimes out of sight, out of mind. Make it a habit to look in the back seat before you get out of a parked car and lock it. That way, you lessen the chances of accidentally leaving a child, pet, or elder to fend against heat illness. 

Rip Currents

rip current escape
To escape rip currents, swim across it and parallel to shore. NOAA NWS

Rip Current Safety slogan: 

Wave and yell...swim parallel. 

Rip currents occur on "nice" days and are often difficult to spot; two facts that allow them to take beachgoers by surprise. This is all the more reason to know how to escape a rip before entering the ocean.

For one, don't try to swim against the current -- you'll only tire yourself and increase your chance of drowning. Instead, swim parallel to the shoreline until you escape the current's pull. If you feel you can't reach shore, face the beach and wave and yell so that someone onshore will notice you're in danger and can get help from a lifegaurd.

Tornadoes

tornado crouch
Practice this tornado crouch position. NOAA NWS

Tornado Safety slogan:

If a tornado is around, get low to the ground.

This slogan isn't a part of an official NWS campaign, but it is used to promote tornado safety in many local communities.

Most tornado deaths are caused by flying debris, so positioning yourself low helps to limit the chance you'll get hit. Not only should you make yourself as low as possible by crouching down on your knees and elbows or laying flat with your head covered, you should also seek shelter on the lowest interior level of a building. An underground basement or tornado shelter is even better. If there's no shelter available, seek safety in a nearby low-lying area, such as a ditch or ravine.